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Full text of "The Maryland Magazine"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



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the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Volume XXIX • Number 1 
November-December • 1957 



Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 




In This Issue: Her Majesty Watches Maryland Take N.C. 
They Love A Parade 

University's Program For Physk \i Fitness 
An Farmer University 




Schulmerich, 
maker of the famed 
carillon at the Chapel 
of the University 
of Maryland, 
now introduces the 
fabulous 

XARILLON 
AMERICANA" 

. . . . heard for the 
first time at the 
SINGING TOWER, 
Lake Wales, Florida 



The melodic beauty of a Schulmerich carillon — long familiar on 
the campus of the University of Maryland — is now heard in new 
combinations of tone colors at the renowned Singing Tower in 
Florida. 

To bell tones of traditional majesty, the "Carillon Americana*" 
adds the enchanting voices of the plucked harp and silvery 
celesta! The result is truly a new musical experience. 

A Schulmerich carillon makes an ideal memorial gift for church, 
chapel, school or college. Many sizes are available. For full 
information, write Schulmerich Carillons, Inc., YY57 Carillon 
Hill, Sellersville, Pa. 

Trademark 




m SCHULMERICH 

CARILLONS 



' 



Maryland 




( OVER: 

Ifter being carried triumphantly on the shoulders o) his victorious players u> 
the Royal Enclosure, Tommy Mom was congratulated by Hei \l<n, I • 
Elizabeth II and lli\ Royal Highness Prince Philip, Governoi VfcKeldin and 
Dr. Elkins, Here Mom, in a symbolic gesture, tells the Queen that all tin 

credit for Maryland's 21-7 win over North Carolina belongs to the muddied 

and bruised men standing in horn of the Royal Enclosun 



the 



Maryland 



NOVEMBER DECEMBER • 15 



magazine 



Volume XXIX 



Number 1 



Alumni Publication of 
the University of Maryland 

BOARD O F REGENTS 
CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI AS 

JOSEPH H. DECKMAN, '31, President 
FRANK BLOCK, '24, Vice-President 
MISS FLORA STREETT, '38, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 



ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM. Director 



LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 


ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. WHEELER, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 


ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
13 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N W. 


OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 


Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 


C. EWING TUTTLE 


C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 


HO 7-90181 (EM 3-2553 


In This Issue — 






FEATURES 






2 


Alumni Diary 




4 


Campus Notes 




8 


Her Majesty Watches Maryland Take N. 


C. 21-7 


10 


They Love a Parade 




12 


The University's Program tor Physical 


Fitness 


14 


Judge William P. Cole. Jr. 




16 


An Earlier University 




18 


Sports 




21 


Alumni Club News 




NEWS FROM THE COLLEGES 






21 


Agriculture 




24 


Arts and Sciences 




28 


Business and Public Administration 




30 


Special and Continuation Studies 




32 


Dentistry 




51 


Education 




51 


Engineering 




53 


Law 




54 


Medicine 




58 


Military Science 




59 


Nursing 




60 


Pharmacy 




62 


Completed Careers 




63 

64 


Social Notes 




Index of Advertisers 






Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 




College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the 


Act of Congress of March 3, 




1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Membe 


of American Alumni Council- 




3ID31 





I m General Alumni Council: 
(School and College Representatives) 

AGRICULTURE 

Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 

Arthur B. Hamilton, '29 
Clayton Reynolds, '22 

KRIs & SCIENCBS 

W. Gilbert Dent, Jr., '26 

Charles Ellinger, '37 
Ralph G. Shure, '32 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42 
Alvin S. Klein, '37 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 

DENTAL 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene D. Lyon, '38 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, '22 

EDUCATION 

Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 
William B. Prigg, '53 

ENGINEERING 

Joseph H. Deckman, '31 
Charles R. Hayleck, '43 
Howard L. Keller, '43 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Miss Irene Knox, '34 

LAW 

Leon H. A. Pierson, '23 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 

MEDICAL 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. Mary France Dennis, '47 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Miss Flora M. Streett, '38 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



Ex-Officio Members of the 
Council: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
I. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 

Baltimore — Samuel Silber, '34 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland— Dr. J. Russell Cook, '23 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

Richard E. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '39 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher. '37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond Paul Mullinix. '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens. '19 







THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

Most diaries contain blank pages upon which may be written events of the 
future as each succeeding day passes. Gazing into crystal balls is dangerous 
business, but since much has been said about a "new look" for the Alumni As- 
sociation we will attempt to look ahead to the immediate future. 

Preliminary thinking by the Alumni Policy Committee pinpoints two major 
objectives for the Alumni Association. The first is to establish alumni pride in 
the total University of Maryland. The second is a combined alumni effort of 
assistance to each school or college of the University to guarantee that it will be 
recognized as the best in its respective field. This will be accomplished in part 
by a much closer faculty-alumni relationship. 

Supporting these broad objectives will be specific alumni activities designed 
to generate active participation, interest and support from alumni. Additional 
assistance will come from the new Field Secretary, Vic Holm, who will give 
across-the-board assistance to the Alumni Association while at the same time 
having a major concern for the organization and continuation of alumni clubs 
in any areas of alumni concentration. His services are available for those who 
are willing to give a little time to initiate geographical clubs and to see them 
move forward in constructive alumni service. 

An Alumni Fund Program is being launched under the capable leadership of 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, a Past President of the University Alumni Association. 
An appeal has gone to all alumni for active memberships, including a subscription 
to Maryland Magazine. The results have been excellent at this point and it is 
hoped the idea of wholehearted alumni support will soon catch fire. 

A financial reserve has been established to assure continuation of an expanded 
program. The University has underwritten a major share of the expanded effort. 
They have also re-emphasized the interdependence of the Alumni Association and 
the University. A journal is being sent on a quarterly basis to all alumni. Alumni 
may expect to hear frequently from the University and the Alumni Association. 
There will be more events, the anticipated establishment of alumni institutes, and 
strong effort to give upper classmen an awareness of the alumni organization and 
their future roll as active members. 

Such is the broad plan from which detailed blueprints are being drawn. The 
University is pulling a big load. Many alumni are lending their strength to the 
effort. The crystal ball tells us that success lies ahead and that together the 
University and the Alumni Association will move to the forefront in the not too 
distant future IF . . . the IF in this case is the individual alumnus. The extent of 
your pride in the University is the determining factor. Until such time as pride 
generates intense loyalty and the effort which comes with it, the IF must remain. 
As a starting point, let's establish the pride by constructive criticism backed by a 
willingness to contribute in your own way to improvement and advancement. The 
blank pages at which we now look may well be filled with a progress report which 
will be the envy of generations to follow. 

As ever, 




/ 0^<—. 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



THE 



MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Atomic power in Caesar's day? 



Certainly! 



It was there, in the ground, in the air and water. It 
always had been. There are no more "raw materials" 
today than there were when Rome ruled the world. 

The only thing new is knowledge . . . knowledge of how 
to get at and rearrange raw materials. Every invention 
of modern times was "available" to Rameses, Caesar, 
Charlemagne. 

In this sense, then, we have available today in existing 
raw materials the inventions that can make our lives 
longer, happier, and inconceivably easier. We need only 
knowledge to bring them into reality. 

Could there possibly be a better argument for the 
strengthening of our sources of knowledge — our colleges 
and universities? Can we possibly deny that the welfare, 
progress — indeed the very fate — of our nation depends 
on the quality of knowledge generated and transmitted 
by these institutions of higher learning? 

It is almost unbelievable that a society such as ours, 
which has profited so vastly from an accelerated accumu- 
lation of knowledge, should allow anything to threaten 
the wellsprings of our learning. 



Yet this is the case 



The crisis that confronts our colleges today threatens 
to weaken seriously their ability to produce the kind of 
graduates who can assimilate and carry forward our 
rich heritage of learning. 

The crisis is composed of several elements: a salary 
scale that is driving away from teaching the kind of 
mind most qualified to teach; overcrowded classrooms; 
and a mounting pressure for enrollment that will double 
by 1967. 

In a very real sense our personal and national progress 
depends on our colleges. They must have our aid. 

Help the colleges or universities of your choice. Help 
them plan for stronger faculties and expansion. The 
returns will be greater than you think. 



If you want to know what the college 
crisis means to you, write for a free book- 
let to: HIGHER EDUCATION, Box 36, 
Times Square Station, New York 36, 
New York. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 




KEEP IT BRIGHT 



Sponsored as a public service, in cooperation with the Council for Financial Aid to Education 




NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



3IG139 




CAMPUS NOTES 



UNIVERSITY CITATION TO GEN. YOUNG 

The University presented a citation 
of achievement to Lieutenant General 
Robert N. Young upon his retirement 
from the United States Army at the 
Presidio of San Francisco, September 
30, 1957. 

General Young is an Arts and 
Sciences alumnus of the University, '22; 
he was an ROTC enrollee as an under- 
graduate and was commissioned a 
Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Reserve 
in June of 1922. In his numerous ad- 
dresses to ROTC graduates General 
Young often spoke of his deep appreci- 
ation for the education and training he 
received at the University and for the 
incentives it provided for his career in 
the armed forces. 

Presenting the citation on behalf of 
Dr. Elkins was Major General Joseph 
D. Caldara, Director of Flight Safety 
Research, Norton Air Force Base, San 
Bernardino, California. General Caldara 
is a 1931 graduate of the University 
and was an ROTC student of General 
Young when the latter was a First 
Lieutenant of Infantry and on duty at 
Maryland as an ROTC Instructor of 
Military Science. 

Prececding the University's presenta- 
tion, Mr. Franklin Orth, Deputy As- 
sistant Secretary of the Army, pre- 
sented General Young with a scroll 
commemorating his distinguished roles 
as a wartime commander and peace- 
time administrator. Secretary of the 
Army Brucker and U. S. Army Chief of 
Staff General Maxwell D. Taylor, 
signed the scroll. 

Twenty-eight hundred troops massed 
on the Presidio of San Francisco parade 
ground for the review of troops. 



The citation, signed by Dr. Elkins 
and presented to Gen. Young by Gen- 
eral Caldara read as follows: 

In acknowledgment of the way in which 
that career has borne to resplendent 
realization the ideals of public serv- 
ice the University seeks to inculcate 
in all her children; 

In appreciation of the valiant and dis- 
tinguished career in the military serv- 
ice of the United States which in the 
quality of its achievement does honor 
to his Alma Mater; 



In recognition of the strength of heart 
and clarity of mind he brought to the 
discharge of thirty-seven years of 
Army service in the years of peace 
and through the perils and agonies of 
two wars; 

In consideration of his devotion through 
all these years to the University that 
sent him forth, in 1922, a youthful 
Bachelor of Arts and stalwart Lieu- 
tenant of Infantry in the United 
States Army Reserve; 

In remembrance of the time, six years 




Lieutenant General Robert N. Young, retiring Sixth United States Army Commander, 
receiving a testimonial scroll from the University of Maryland, bis alma mater. The 
award was presented on behalf of Dr. Elkins, by Major General Joseph D. Caldara, 
USAF, Norton AFB, San Bernardino, California. General Caldara was one of General 
Young's ROTC students at the University. Also present for the happy occasion was 
(left) his wife, Mrs. Young, and (right) bis mother. Mrs. Fanny Hempstone Young. 

U.S. ARMY PHOTOGRAPH. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



thereafter, when he returned proudly 
to teach as Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics in the University 
of Maryland's Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps curriculum; 

/// admiration o\ the accomplishment 
that makes him. as a Lieutenant 
General in the United States Army, 
the highest ranking officer whose 
military career began with Reserve 
Officers Training Corps, and 

In realization of the fact that from the 
University of his choice came the im- 
petus toward the Army career he so 
illustriously adorned and in which he 
so splendidly acquitted himself, 
I, Wilson Homer Elkins. D. Phil., 
Oxon., President, do indite and cause 
to be issued this testimonial. 

General Young's service in the Army 
has been an illustrious one. During the 
first twenty years of his military serv- 
ice, he attended the Army schools in- 
cluding the Command and General 
Staff College at Fort Leavenworth. 
Kansas. Overseas tours of duty were 
in Puerto Rico and Hawaii. 

His World War fl service included 
an assignment as Secretary of the War 
Department General Staff under Gen- 
eral George C. Marshall for seven 
months. He was promoted to Brigadier 
General and assigned to the 70th In- 
fantry Division at Camp Adair, Oregon, 
in March of 1943. In September of 
1944 he joined the 3d Infantry Division 
as Assistant Division Commander and 
served in that capacity during its drive 
through Southern France, the Vosges 
Mountains, the Colmar Pocket opera- 
tion, and, finally, the capture of Salz- 
burg, Austria. 

In August of 1950 he attended the 
parachute school at Fort Benning, 
Georgia, and qualified as a parachutist. 
He then served for one year in the 82d 
Airborne Division. 

In 1951 General Young was pro- 
moted to Major General and assigned 
to command the 2d Infantry Division 
in Korea. He remained with that unit 
until the summer of 1952. During this 
period successful attack was completed 
against the now famous Heartbreak 
Ridge hill mass. 

From lune, 1952 to February, 1953 
he was Commandant of The Infantry 
School at Fort Benning, Georgia. 

From February, 1953, to July 1, 
1955, he was assigned to the Pentagon 
as Assistant Chief of Staff for Person- 
nel (G-l), Department of the Army. 

On July 1, 1955, General Young as- 
sumed command of Sixth Army at its 
headquarters at the Presidio. 




At left. Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, prominent Baltimore urological surgeon and newly ap- 
pointed General Chairman of the Greater University of Maryland Fund, reviews the Uni- 
versity's national alumni geographical distribution with University President Wilson IE 
Elkins. The annual alumni giving program is scheduled to get underway in January. 



Alumni Giving Program Set In Motion 



A national alumni annual giving pro- 
gram to be known as the Greater Uni- 
versity of Maryland Fund was set in 
motion September 3 with the election of 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, prominent 
Baltimore surgeon, as its General Chair- 
man. 

In making the announcement, the 
University's Alumni Fund Committee 
set January, 1958 as the kick-off date 
of the annual giving program. 

At the same time the Committee 
designated four items that will receive 
priority support during 1958. They in- 
clude scholarships, equipment for the 
Student-Faculty-Alumni Center in Balti- 
more, special book collections for the 
$1,000,000 library now nearing comple- 
tion at College Park, and revenue to 
preserve and perpetuate University 
traditions. 

The Committee is part of a 20- 
member Sponsored Resources Board 
created by the Board of Regents in the 
Spring of this year. Its members in- 
clude Arthur Bell. Catonsville orthodon- 
tist; J. Gilbert Prendergast, Baltimore 
attorney; Joseph H. Deckman, Washing- 
ton, D. C. building and supply execu- 
tive; Mrs. William Kricker. College 



Park home economist; and Dr. Thur- 
ston Adams, Baltimore surgeon. 

Commenting on the alumni action. 
Dr. Elkins said, "The University of 
Maryland alumni are to be congratu- 
lated for their important support to the 
strong movement now underway to 
make the University one of the coun- 
try's leading institutions. Dr. Goldstein 
and the Greater University of Maryland 
Fund will receive my utmost support." 

Board of Regents Chairman Charles 
P. McCormick said that he was especi- 
ally gratified on the election of Dr. 
Goldstein because of "his extensive 
experience in public service in Balti- 
more, which assures the fund of capa- 
ble and experienced leadership." 

Dr. Goldstein was Chairman o\ the 
Doctor's Committee for the $20,000,000 
drive for a medical center at Sinai 
Hospital in 1953 and has held posi- 
tions of leadership in numerous civic 
campaigns. 

He organized the Genito-Urinary 
Department at Sinai Hospital in 1920 
and became a member o{ the Univer- 
sity of Maryland faculty in 1921. an 
affiliation he held until his retirement 
(Continued on next page) 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



Campus Notes 

Continued from page 5 



last year. The University awarded him 
the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Science at the June. 1957 commence- 
ment in recognition of his outstanding 
contributions to the medical profession. 

The new General Chairman of the 
Greater University of Maryland Fund 
was born in New York City in 1887. 
Educated in New Haven, Connecticut 
public schools, he later studied at the 
Yale University Sheffield Scientific 
School and in 1908, entered the Yale 
Medical School. He completed his 
medical education at the University of 
Maryland and was graduated in 1912. 

Following his graduation, he interned 
at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore where 
he became interested in the study of 
genito-urinary surgery, a field in which 
he has become one of the country's 
leading medical authorities. 

In 1927, he organized the Medical 
Department of Levindale, Hebrew 
Home for the Aged and Infirm. He 
was later made Medical Director of the 
institution, a position he now occupies. 
Dr. Goldstein was also instrumental in 
the establishment of the Hoffberger 
Urologic Research Laboratory in Balti- 
more of which he is now Director. 

DR. DYKE HEADS HEALTH SERVICE 

Dr. Lester M. Dyke, formerly Director 
of Health Services and Professor of Hy- 
giene at the University of Illinois and 
Medical Director of the University Re- 
tirement System of Illinois, has been 
appointed Director of the University of 
Maryland Student Health Service. 

Following two years of surgical re- 
search at the Walter Reed Army Medi- 
cal Center Post-Graduate School, Dr. 
Dyke served for 26 years in the Army 
Medical Corps and retired with the rank 
of Colonel in 1946. In his post at the 
University of Illinois, Dr. Dyke served 
on committees for accident compensa- 
tion and radiation hazards and safety. 

Dr. Dyke will replace Dr. Harry A. 
Bishop who has been at Maryland since 
September, 1948. 

STUDY OF 
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS 

In July, the University of Maryland re- 
ceived the first installment of a grant of 
$66,000 from the Carnegie Corporation 
of New York for a three-year experi- 
mental study of Junior High School 



Mathematics. The grant will be admin- 
istered by the College of Education. 
John R. Mayor, Director of Education 
of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and recently 
appointed Professor of Mathematics 
and Education (part-time) at Maryland, 
will serve as Director of the study. The 
Associate Director will be Dr. M. 
L. Keedy, formerly of the University of 
Nebraska. 

Little or no attention has been given 
to the mathematics of grades seven and 
eight by mathematicians, psychologists, 
and other scholars since the 1923 re- 
port, sponsored by the Mathematical 
Association of America, entitled The 
Reorganization of Mathematics in Sec- 
ondary Education. This report was 
widely influential and is in considerable 
part responsible for the junior high 
school mathematics courses we find in 
1957. The concern of scientists about 
junior high school mathematics is 
shared by a great many mathematics 
teachers at this level, as well as in 
senior high school and college. Many 
believe that the mathematics curricu- 
lum, in grades seven and eight especi- 
ally, is inadequate to meet modern 
needs. It is often stated that lack of 
interest in mathematics and science in 
senior high school and college may be 
due largely to unhappy experiences in 
junior high school mathematics. 

It is proposed that the Maryland 
study be developed with the coopera- 
tion of junior high schools in Prince 
Georges and Montgomery Counties, 
Maryland; Arlington County, Virginia; 
and other school systems in Maryland. 
The study will be under the direction 
of an Advisory Committee representing 
the Department of Mathematics, Col- 
lege of Education, College of Engineer- 
ing, and other interested staff members 
of the University of Maryland; the 
supervisors of mathematics in the coun- 
ties named above; and additional repre- 
sentatives of these school systems. 

The goal of the study is to prepare 
materials and test them in junior high 
school classroom situations in an at- 
tempt to determine appropriate age 
levels at which certain mature mathe- 
matical concepts could be appropriately 
taught, and whether these materials 
contribute more effectively to the goals 
of general education and to greater 
aptitude for and interest in the study 
of secondary-school mathematics and 
science. 

During the first year of the study 
(and to be continued throughout the 
three-year period), cooperating teachers 
will register for Education 1 37 at the 
University. This course will treat the 



mathematical background needed by 
the teachers and learning theory which 
would be appropriate for selection of 
materials, and teaching them, at the 
seventh and eighth grade levels. A num- 
ber of units will be prepared during the 
first semester and tried out in junior 
high school classes as early as the sec- 
ond semester of the first year of the 
study. In the second semester, the lec- 
tures on mathematics and psychology 
will be continued, but more time of the 
seminar will be devoted to the prepara- 
tion of materials and discussion of the 
experimental units. During the second 
semester and summer term, a syllabus 
for the experimental course to be taught 
in grade seven and at least the first 
semester of an eighth-grade course will 
be developed for use during the second 
year, and with needed revision during 
the third year, of the study. 

In addition to the teaching of the 
experimental courses during the second 
and third years of the study, it is 
planned that the seminar will be con- 
tinued on a basis similar to that in the 
second semester of the first year. Ap- 
propriate testing materials would be 
developed. Continuous revision of ma- 
terials and testing would be carried on 
under the direction of the Advisory 
Committee. At the end of the study, 
a final report will embody report of 
experimentation, course materials, and 
recommendations. The final report and 
progress reports during the three years 
would be made available to curriculum 
planning groups throughout the country. 

The plan of the study is somewhat 
similar to that of the University of 
Illinois Committee on School Mathe- 
matics which is concerned with the 
mathematics of grades nine through 
twelve. The proposed Maryland project 
will provide important support to the 
many current activities directed toward 
the improvement of instruction in 
mathematics including not only the 
Illinois program, but also those of the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Commission on Mathematics and the 
Mathematical Association of America 
Committee on the Undergraduate 
Program. 

NEW PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIPS 

More than $3,000 has been made avail- 
able to the School of Pharmacy by 
Read's Drug Stores' Foundation, of 
Baltimore, to support six pharmacy 
freshman scholarships. 

To be awarded to students on the 
basis of high scholastic standing and 
aptitude, the scholarships will cover tui- 
tion, fees and equipment. 

The scholarships will make a total of 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ten that will be awarded to incoming 
freshmen for the current year. Two 
are supported by the School of Phar- 
macy Alumni Association, and two arc 
supported by the Maryland Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

Read's Drug Stores' Foundation also 
sponsor five other pharmacy scholar- 
ships that have been available to sopho- 
mores, juniors and seniors since 1944. 

The freshman scholarships were for- 
mally presented at a joint meeting of 
the pharmacy alumni, the Baltimore 
Retail Druggists Association and the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
September 19, at the Kelly Memorial 
Building. 

MR. MCCORMICK HEADS 
CONSTELLATION FUND DRIVE 

Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of 
the Board of Regents, served as Chair- 
man of the industrial divisions in the 
Constellation Restoration Fund Drive 
during September. He directed the 
appeal to more than 14,000 individual 
manufacturing concerns and retailers 
during the 30-day campaign. Mr. 
McCormick is Chairman of the Board 
of Directors of McCormick and Co., 
Inc., of Baltimore. 

CSCS CELEBRATES TEN YEARS OF SERVICE 

The College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies recently celebrated its tenth 
birthday. Established in July, 1947, 
by the Board of Regents, the College 
has grown from two speech classes at 
the Pentagon to a program which is 
almost world wide in extent. Program 
centers in Europe are to be found in 
Ethiopia, France, French Morocco. 
Germany (86 centers), Greece, Italy, 
Libya, the Netherlands, Norway, Saudi 
Arabia, Spain, Turkey, and the United 
Kingdom. Bases in the Far East include 
those in Formosa, Japan, Korea, Oki- 
nawa, and Guam. The Atlantic Pro- 
gram extends from Greenland to Ber- 
muda with additional centers in Iceland. 
Labrador, and Newfoundland. 

Maryland's off-campus opportunities 
do not end with the Overseas Program. 
Even more important to the citizens of 
the State are the approximately 200 
credit courses offered each semester at 
some 40 off-campus centers through- 
out the State. One of these off-campus 
centers, the Baltimore Division of 
CSCS, offers over 50 courses to nearly 
a thousand students this semester. 

In the Baltimore Division, courses 
are offered in the late afternoon and 
evening in the fields of business admin- 
istration, economics, education, govern- 
ment and politics, geography, history, 




Pharmacy School scholarships were recently awarded ten students, eight of which are 
pictured here. Seated left to right: Dean loss. Shield Smink, June /-./it,'. Leon Rosen. 
Standing left to right: Aaron Kadish, Louis Diamond, Richard Wankel, Harvey Reisen- 
weber, William Tabak. Awardees not pictured were Lois Lee and George Weaver. 



industrial education, languages, philos- 
ophy, psychology, sociology, speech, 
English, and the natural and physical 
sciences. 

Not the least of the University's 
services to the people of the State of 
Maryland are those performed by the 
Division of Conferences and Institutes 
which last year conducted more than 
25 institutes. Approximately 13,000 
citizens of the State participated in 



conferences and institutes last year. 

Special education programs, consist- 
ing of institutes, conferences, work- 
shops and short courses, are specifically 
designed and conducted to meet the 
particular needs of the group request- 
ing such services. Examples of these 
special programs include the Aviation 
Education Workshop and the Business 
Management Institute, the Governor's 
(Continued on page 20) 




Visitor to the campus, Oct. 3, was Mr. Hermann Hagen, Mayor of Heidelberg. Germany. 
Mayor Hagen was the luncheon guest of Dr. Elkins and presented him with an illustrated 
book of Heidelberg. In turn, Dr. Elkins gave the Mayor a similar book of the Chesa- 
peake Bay area. Dr. Elkins was the recent guest of Mayor Hagen in Heidelberg. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 




43.000 spectators stand respectfully as the combined bands of 
Maryland and North Carolina play, "The Star Spangled Banner.'' 




Watch those Terrapins go! 



Her Majesty Watches Maryland Take N. C, 21-7 



I N THEIR WILDEST DREAMS, ALUMNI, STUDENTS AND FACULTY 

could not have conjured up a more satisfactory spectacle: a 
roaring, enthusiastic crowd of 43.000; a come-from-behind 
victory over a highly-regarded opponent; and a roster of 
dignitaries led by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and His 
Royal Highness Prince Philip. Such was the scene October 
19 at Byrd Stadium. 

And the climax! If Hollywood had devised such an ending, 
motion picture critics everywhere would have denounced it 
as monumentally unrealistic. And yet, there it was: behind 



SEE JOE BLAIR S DESCRIPTION OF 
THE GAME'S ACTION ON PAGE 18. 



0-7 at the half, Maryland's Terrapins overpowered North 
Carolina's Tarheels leaving them bruised and confused at the 
final score, 21-7. Then Tommy Mont's men hoisted him to 
their shoulders and carried him across the field to the Royal 
Enclosure to receive the personal congratulations of the 
Queen, the Prince, Dr. Elkins and the Governors of Maryland 
and North Carolina. 

Preceeded by the official host party and the Common- 
wealth Ambassadors, the royal party arrived at the stadium 
at approximately 2:10 p.m. Upon the Queen's entrance to 
the Royal Enclosure, Her Royal Standard was raised to a flag- 
pole atop the press box by a detachment of Air Force per- 
sonnel assigned to the University. 

The University band then moved into the stadium and. in 
concert with the Tarheel band, played the alma maters of 
both schools. The presidents of both universities presented 
to Her Majesty and His Royal Highness the co-captains of 



Her Majesty ascends the steps of the Royal Enclosure to the accompaniment 
of American cheers and the snapping of a hundred photographic exposures. 




their teams: Gene Alderton and Jack Healy, of Maryland, 
and Dave Reed and Buddy Payne, of North Carolina. I he 
captains presented to Her Majesty a football autographed bj 
members of the Maryland team and a replica of the medallion 
used in the prc-game toss-up. The combined bands then 
played, "God Save the Queen" and "The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner," and the game was under way. 

Seated with Her Majesty and Prince Philip were Dr. and 
Mrs. Elkins and family; Governor and Mrs. McKeldin and 
family; Governor Luther H. Hodges of North Carolina and 
family; and Dr. William Friday, President, Consolidated Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, and Mrs. Friday. 

Others seated in the Royal Enclosure were Dr. W. B. 
Aycock. Chancellor, University of North Carolina, and Mrs. 
Aycock; Mr. Charles P. McCormick, Chairman. Board of 
Regents, University of Maryland, and family; Mr. Joseph H. 
Deckman, President, Alumni Association, University of Mary- 
land, and Mrs. Deckman; Howard B. Miller. President of 
the University's Student Government Association and his 
guest, Miss Lynn Needle, and various members of the Royal 
party. 

Seated to the right of the Enclosure, were members of the 
Board of Regents, and their guests. Commonwealth Ambas- 
sadors and their wives. His Excellency, Sir Percy Spender, 
K.B.E., Q.C., and Lady Spender represented Australia. His 
Excellency, Sir Leslie Munro, K.C.M.G., and Lady Munro, 
representing New Zealand, and His Excellency, R.S.S. Gune- 
wardene, Ambassador of Ceylon were also present. Other 
Ambassadors present were His Excellency Mohammed Ali 
and Begum Ali of Pakistan; and His Excellency W. C. du 
Plessis and Mrs. du Plessis from the Union of South Africa. 
The Chairman of British Joint Services, Sir Michael Denney 
and Lady Denney were also present. 

Members of the Student Government Association and their 
guests were also seated in Box 26. In Box 24, located to the 
Queen's left were seated the various deans of the schools and 
colleges, and their families. 

In commemoration of her visit, a number of gifts were 
presented to Her Majesty. A covered clear crystal urn with 
tear-drop finial, standing 14 inches high and mounted on an 
illuminated ebony base, was presented on behalf of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Other gifts included two football- 
shaped music boxes for Prince Charles and Princess Anne, 
one playing Maryland's "Victory Song" and the other, "Mary- 
land, My Maryland." Margaret Elkins, 11 -year-old daughter 
of Dr. Elkins, presented a 14-inch felt football-player doll for 
Prince Charles and a girl doll for Princess Anne. Governor 
McKeldin presented four gifts: a china equestrian figure of 
the drummer's horse which led Her Majesty's coronation 
parade (created by Kathleen Wheeler, of Bethesda, Mary- 
land); two Sioux arrows from the Southwestern Plains Crafts 
Center, Anandarko, Oklahoma; two bone arrow heads esti- 
mated to be more than 300 years old excavated in the area 
of the Magothy and Susquehanna Rivers in Maryland; minia- 
ture United States, Maryland and Great Britain flags pre- 
sented in a mahogany box; and a bronze medallion, souvenir 
of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. 

The Kiwanis Club of Smyrna, Georgia, presented a child's 
football uniform, an exact replica of those worn by the Terra- 
pin squad. Presented to Her Majesty by the Terrapin Club 
was a hand-crafted gold brooch set with 37 matched rubies 
and 10 full-cut matched diamonds. 




Chatting genially at the President's pre-gamt <• 
tion for distinguished guests are, lift in right, Governoi 
Hodges, Governor McKeldin and \li ifcCormick 




y xM 



Maryland's second score was made by Teddy Kershner, here shown 
beginning his brilliant 81-yard run toward touchdown territory. 




This covered urn of clear crystal, with low 
circular base and teardrop finial, was presented 
to H. M. Queen Elizabeth II by the I niversity. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



Presented to Her Majesty by the Terrapin Club was 
this special hand-crafted gold brooch set with 37 
matched rubies and 10 full-cut matched diamonds. 





■■Mn^HHBRI 



They 
Love 
A Parade 



* 





Alumni will remember that much of the excitement 
of University sports events was generated by the measured 
martial airs of the University Band. Although several bands 
perform at varying sports events through the school year, the 
most spectacular of all is the marching band which performs 
during the short football season. 

Early this September, while the rest of the student body 
enjoyed their last two weeks of summer vacation, 131 hard- 
working band members worked out fancy formations and 
marching music in preparation for the first home game with 
North Carolina State. 

Alumni attending that game saw an almost perfect per- 
formance of musicianship and marching formation skill. What 
they did not see were the rough and tumble early practice 
sessions which transformed a crowd of students into the 
precision outfit which marched and counter-marched during 
the State-Maryland game half-time. 

Sessions began each morning at 9 o'clock when sleepy-eyed 
musicians assembled, dressed in blue jeans, sports shirts, straw 
hats and other leisure-time apparel. 

Band Director Hubert P. Henderson and Assistant Director 
Dana Mason drilled their "troops" from a vantage point high 
on a football coach's tower, their voices amplified by a port- 
able loudspeaker. Each evening music rehearsals were 
conducted in the Armory's band room, bringing each day's 
practice to a total of six hours. 

The results of this "early week," as it is known, have been 
displayed at the North Carolina State, Wake Forest, North 
Carolina and Tennessee games. The intensive program of 
work in September transformed the blue-jeaned aggregation 
into the smart-looking band which represents the University 
in glittering fashion. This year, adding to the band's snappy 
appearance are new uniforms, utilizing the four colors of the 
University. They are basically black with red stripes on the 
pants, red epaulets and black high crowned hats with red 
plumes. The capes are red with white lining and the long, 
double-breasted coats have a wide cuff of red with the word 
"Maryland" printed on it in white. The shoes are black with 
white spats partially enclosing them. Gold buttons and gold 
bands on the hats complete the trimming. 

Hard work did not stop with the end of "early week." All 
during the school year rehearsals are scheduled Tuesday and 
Thursday afternoons from 3 to 5 p.m. In addition, practice 
begins at 9:30 a.m. on Saturdays preceding a football game. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



The faithful attendance of band members at these rehearsals 
makes it possible for Henderson to come up with a com- 
pletely different show for every home game. Performances 
are repeated only at away games. 

The hall-time shows are the drawing board creations ol 
Band Director Henderson, who works on them all summer 
long. This is Mr. Henderson's second year as Band Director. 
Formerly Director of Bands at Montana State University, Mr. 
Henderson came to Maryland by way of the UniversitJ ol 
North Carolina where he served as Assistant Director of 
Bands. 

Appropriately enough, the North Carolina band joined the 
marching band of the University of Maryland in entertain- 
ing Queen Elizabeth when she visited College Park for the 
North Carolina game October 19. Although no special pro- 
gram was planned for half-time, the two bands combined to 
form a huge ER, the royal insignia, with a crown above it, 
and played "Rule Britannia." 

Alumni who returned for the Homecoming festivities 
October 26, when Maryland and Tennessee clashed on the 
gridiron, must have been struck by the timeliness of the band's 
half-time show. The band played Maryland's fight song as it 
might be played around the world — in France, Germany, 
England, the Far East, and Argentina — and worked their 
routine around this theme. Because Maryland University 
has established centers of education for people in many parts 
of the world, it is quite possible that students in Tokyo sing 
the fight song with as much enthusiasm in Tokyo as they do 
in College Park. 

In addition to the shows given at home, the band represents 
the University at one away game. This year the group 
travelled to Duke University October 5. 

Football season will be over shortly after this article ap- 
pears, but this will not mean the dissolution of the band. In 
addition to the marching band there is the concert band, the 
ROTC band, the pep band and the basketball band. The 
concert band of about 80 members begins rehearsals during 
early week and continues to rehearse on the basis of volun- 
tary attendance every Wednesday evening during football 
season. During the second semester the concert band is of 
primary importance and the rehearsal schedule is devoted 
entirely to sight-reading and preparing for concerts. Two 
formal concerts are presented in the Coliseum, three "pop" 
concerts on the Mall, and a concert for the All-Maryland 
Band Day. In March the band will make a three-day concert 
tour of the State. 

The ROTC band is made up of all freshman and sophomore 
basic ROTC students who qualify for membership in the 
marching band. Organized during the first week of classes 
in the fall semester, the ROTC band provides musical train- 
ing as well as drill appropriate for military bandsmen. This 
band plays for drills and parades according to a schedule 
devised by the Commandant of Cadets and the Director of 
Bands. The high point of the ROTC drill is the annual Mili- 
tary Day Review and the band takes a prominent part. 

The pep band is made up of all freshmen band members 
plus volunteers from the upper class band members. It plays 
for all pep rallies and informal occasions where it is not 
feasible to use the regular University Marching Band. 

The Basketball band is selected by the Assistant Band 
Director from band members who volunteer and agree to 
participate for the entire basketball season. This organization 
of 30 members wears distinctive uniforms provided by the 
Athletic Department and is the official band at all basketball 
games in the Activities Building. 

Perhaps the busiest people in the band organization, in 
addition to Mr. Henderson, are the student officers. This vear's 




1 



>.- * 



r'jfu 





leaders are President Fred Froehlich. '58; Vice President Hood 
Geisbert, '58; Secretary Harriet Husted. '60; and Treasurer 
James Murphy, '59. These four students are the nucleus of 
the Executive Council of Band Officers which meets regularly 
to plan activities and formulate policy for the group. 

Hard work does not go unrewarded. For faithful service 
in conformance with the rules outlined in the band constitu- 
tion, freshmen earn a monogram, sophomores a sweater, 
juniors a key, and seniors are awarded a cup. Recognition 
also comes from membership in fan Beta Sigma, National 
Band Sorority, and Kappa Kappa I'si. National Band 
Fraternity. 

We alumni can also add our bit of recognition to this 
deserving group of students if only through renewed appreci- 
ation of their efforts in representing the UniversitJ so well. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



11 




The University's Program 



for 



Physical Fitness 






Critics within and without the 
united states have oft repeated that 
American youth are physically unde- 
veloped, that their general state of health 
is low and that they are physically in- 
capable of facing the physical require- 
ments of modern life. 

There is a basis of truth, of course, 
in these criticisms. President Eisenhower 
revealed his concern by calling a Presi- 
dent's Conference of Fitness of Ameri- 
can Youth last summer. 

In the opening address of the Con- 
ference, Vice President Nixon said: 

"We are not a nation of softies 
but we could become one, if 
proper attention is not given to 
the trend of our time, which is 
toward the invention of all sorts 
of gadgetry to make life easy and 
in so doing to reduce the oppor- 
tunity for normal physical health- 
giving exercise. 

"The objective of an adequate 
physical fitness program can be 
summed up in one word — par- 
ticipation — participation on the 
part of every boy and girl in 
America in some form of health- 
ful recreational and physical 
activity. 

"The super athlete is not our 
primary concern. He will take 
care of himself. It is the boy or 
girl with ordinary physical abili- 
ties who should receive the major 
share of our attention." 



The University's College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health is 
vitally concerned with this problem. The 
College through its Departments of 
Physical Education for Men and Physi- 
cal Education for Women conducts a 
two-year required physical education 
program for all Freshman and Sopho- 
more students. This, then, is a report 
of the organization and scope of the 
program, its objectives, and how stu- 
dents themselves feel about this re- 
quired training. 

So as to meet the special interests 
and needs for activity of students, a 
wide variety of classes have been or- 
ganized — approximately 150 sections 
each semester. Some classes, particu- 
larly those in swimming, are organized 
on various skill levels for the beginning 
student as well as the advanced and 
more highly skilled individual. 

Although every class stresses the 
"learning how to do," there is emphasis 
upon the health and fitness contribution 
to the welfare of the individual, the 
rules and strategy of games, the history 
and the place of each activity in our 
American culture as well as the inter- 
national aspects of sports or dances. 

The College's training facilities are 
impressive and include the new Cole 
Student Activities Building with its 
swimming pool, gymnasia, wrestling 
rooms, playing fields and classrooms 
and the Preinkert Field House which 
includes a gymnasium, swimming pool, 



12 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



dance studio and playing fields for 
hockey, soccer, archery, and Softball. 
Eight hard surface tennis courts are 
adjacent to the Activities Building and 
also to the Preinkcrt Field House. In 
addition, the Coliseum is used as a sup- 
plement facility to the regular physical 
education activity areas. Some activi- 
ties, such as bowling, canoeing, fishing, 
and sailing are taught by University 
faculty in community areas that are 
adaptable to class instruction. 

During the year 1957-58, a part of 
, the new 18-hoIe golf course will be 
completed with final completion sched- 
uled for June, 1958. This magnificent 
area will add much to the program of 
required physical education. It will in- 
clude a driving range where specific 
instruction in skills will be taught and 
the course will be available for practice 
play of classes and for the recreational 
use of others. 

The programs for men and women 
are organized in such a way as to meet 
the needs and interests of all 3,600 
program-enrolled students. Every effort 
is made to keep the enrollment of each 
class at a level to make possible the 
best kind of learning situation for each 
student. Students are expected to gain 
a degree of proficiency in the activity, 
dependent upon their skill level at the 
beginning of the course, and they are 
graded, by means of skill tests upon 
their performance, and by written tests 
on their knowledge and understanding 
of the activity. 

By and large, the programs for men 
and women are organized and con- 
ducted in the same way. However, it 
is necessary to meet the varying interest 
| of each group and, therefore, the larg- 
[ est number of classes are organized for 
j men or for women, although there is an 
increasing interest in co-educational ac- 
tivities. The separate programs are de- 
scribed below. 

Required Physical Education 
for Men 

New facilities in the Student Activi- 
ties Building now provides an oppor- 
tunity for the College of Physical 
Education, Health and Recreation to 
offer sports and other physical educa- 
tion activities which previously have 
not been possible. In this way, the 
University can make an even greater 
contribution to the development of fit- 
ness, sports appreciation, as well as the 
present and future leisure time resources 
of the students of the University of 
Maryland. 

The re-organization of the Required 
Physical Education Program provides 
a variety of experiences for each stu- 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



dent. As m other fields oi endeavor, 
every effort is made to meel the in- 
teresu and needs ol each student. All 
entering Freshmen are required to com- 
plete a health examination administered 
by the University Health Service. Stu- 
dents failing to pass the health examina- 
tion are enrolled in Adapted Physical 
Education. That is. students with 
marked handicaps are guided into ac- 
tivities in which they are capable ol 
competing, such as archers, howling. 
shuffleboard, horseshoes, or table tennis. 
All other students are required to enroll 
in and successfully complete PE I. 
"Orientation to Physical Education." 
The following is a description of Pli 1 : 

PE 1. ORIENTATION TO PHYSIC At 

education. This is required 
of all physically able students. 
and is a prerequisite to PE 3. 
5, and 7. The purpose of this 
course is to give the student 
a better understanding and 
appreciation of the place of 
sports and physical education 
in the American way of life. 
It is designed to assess the 
fitness, skill level, and swim- 
ming ability of each student; 
introduce the student to a 
variety of sport skills as indi- 
cated in each of the three 
areas; and to acquaint the 
student with problems relating 
to such matters of personal 
importance as diet, training, 
rest, effect of strenuous exer- 
cise, the use of alcohol and 
tobacco, and how to lose and 
gain weight. 
The textbook for "Orientation to 
Physical Education" is Physical Educa- 
tion and Healthful Living by L. M. 
Fraley, W. R. Johnson and B. H. 
Massey. Each class meets in a class- 
room once a week for instruction and 
examinations on problems in physical 
education and health. This is the only 
health instruction which every male 
student at the University receives other 
than the concomitant instruction asso- 
ciated with the other courses in physical 
education. 

On the basis of the student's health 
examination, the student's swimming 
ability, level of fitness, sport skill level, 
and past experience, each student is 
guided into one course in each of the 
following three areas. 

pe 3. developmental and comba- 
tive ACTIVITIES 
Apparatus 

Double Tumbling and Bal- 
ancing 
Individual Tumbling and 
Fencing 



w reading and [rack aim 
i ield 

Weight I lain 

Modern Dance 

I'l 5. 1 1 \M \\i> i\ni\ mi \i SPOH i S 

Softball and Basketball 
Speedball and I lickerball 
I ouch I ootball ami \ ollej - 

hall 
Soccer and Voile) ball 
I lementarj Sw imming 
Advanced Swimming 
Life Saving 
Diving 
Watei Salets 




d 




PE 7. RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Archery and Bowling 
Badminton and Bait Casting 
Camping and Outdoor Ac- 
tivities 
Fishing 
Canoeing 
Golf 

Social Dance 
Square Dance 
Recreational Games 
Sailing 

Physical Education for Women 
Before Registration, all entering fresh- 
men are required to take a posture test 
and a classification test in swimming. 
If the individual is able to pass the 
beginners test in swimming, she is then 
permitted to elect another activity or 
she may take more advanced courses 
in swimming or Senior Life Saving or 
Water Safety Instructors. 

In PE 2, Orientation Activities, re- 
quired of all Freshman women, the 
posture test is used as a basis for much 
of the discussion and work in that 
course. There is also much attention 
given to the fitness of the individual. 
Attaining an understanding oi the mean- 
ing of physical fitness and how to attain 
an optimum level of fitness to suit the 
needs of the individual are stressed. 
A section of the course deals with 
(Continued on page 20) 

13 




Judge William P. Cole, Jr. 



M ONDAY MORNING. WHEN STUDENTS AND FACULTY 

walked to their first day of instruction of the 1957-58 
school year, many saw National and University flags 
at either ends of the Armory flying at half-mast. The 
traditional sign of mourning was in memory of Judge 
William P. Cole, Jr., perhaps the best liked and re- 
spected of the University family, who died quietly 
1:55 p.m., September 22 at University Hospital, 
Baltimore. 



14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



"His life is an inspiration to all of us 



On September 24, more than 400 
persons, including Dr. Elkins, the Board 
of Regents who were honorary pall- 
bearers, members of the University 
administrative staff and the faculty, 
members of the United States Court of 
Customs and Patent Appeals, friends 
and the family of Judge Cole, attended 
services at the Cathedral Church of the 
Incarnation, Baltimore. Burial was at 
Arlington National Cemetery. 

Judge Cole enjoyed an achievement- 
filled career of public service. He had 
served in the U. S. House of Repre- 
sentatives, as Chairman of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Regents, as a member 
of the Board of Regents of the Smith- 
sonian Institution, and as a judge of the 
U. S. Court of Customs and Patent 
Appeals. 

Dr. Elkins, commenting on Judge 
Cole's contribution to the University 
said: 

"The death of Judge Cole is a great 
loss to the University of Maryland. As 
a member of the Board of Regents and 
the State Board of Agriculture for 26 
years and its chairman for 12 years, he 
was more closely associated with Uni- 
versity affairs than any other person in 
public light. His interest and activity 
were extraordinary. He gave liberally 
of his time and talents in establishing 
policies, providing guidance and en- 
couraging every worthwhile activity. 

"I think it is fair to say that Judge 
Cole contributed more to the welfare of 
the University than any other person. 
His life is an inspiration to all of us 
who are working for the advancement 
of a great educational institution." 

Judge Cole, a 1910 graduate of the 
Maryland Agricultural College and a 
student at Maryland Law School, was 
forced to resign his charimanship of the 
Board of Regents in June, 1956 due to 
poor health. 

Succeeding Judge Cole as Chairman 
was Baltimore industrialist and civic 
leader, Charles P. McCormick. Reflect- 



ing on the Judge's career in the public 
service, Mr. McCormick said: 

"Judge Cole was a virtuous jurist. 
a wise statesman, an outstanding gentle- 
man and a devoted chairman who 
served faithfully and honestly. Mary- 
land University, especially at the end. 
was his life. Judge Cole took every- 
thing at Maryland personally. He was 
a very good friend." 

The Baltimore Evening Sun, com- 
menting on Judge Cole's life, said: 

"William P. Cole, Jr., was no momen- 
tary flash in the headlines, quick to take 
fire and quick to burn out. He was of 
the more durable sort and, from shortly 
after World War I until his death yester- 
day, won recognition as a dedicated 
public servant in the best sense of the 
word. He did not, perhaps, achieve the 
top level of community influence but 
lived on the more stable ranks just 
below the top where a man can often 
live a more useful life than on the 
peaks. 

"To measure the breadth of this 
quiet career it is necessary only to 
glance at its turning points. There was 
first the testing time of Judge Cole's 
generation — the first war against Ger- 
many in which he served overseas and 
emerged a captain; his election to Con- 
gress followed quickly and he served 
there for fourteen years; President 
Roosevelt raised him to the bench and. 
at his death, he was judge of the United 
States Court of Customs and Patent 
Appeals. 

"Judge Cole's most satisfying experi- 
ence, however, must have come from 
his service to the University of Mary- 
land, his own alma mater. He was 
named to the Board of Regents in 1931 
but, in 1944, he rose to the Chairman 
and hence oversaw the vast expansion 
which engaged the University in the 
dozen years just passed. His guidance 
during this creative, often tempestuous 
time was appropriately commemorated 
during the past year when the William 



P. Cole, Jr. Student Activities Building 
uas dedicated in his honor on the ( ol 
lege Park campus." 

Although ill and unable to attend the 
dedication of the William P. Cole, Jr. 
Student Activities Building. Judge ( olc 
was presented with a recording of the 
proceedings and a written and picture 
story of the ceremonies. Says \li 
McCormick: 

"I called on him at the (University) 
Hospital after the dedication and we 
had pictures of everything that occurred. 
I think the dedication picked him up 
for many months." 

Judge Cole was born in Towson. 
Maryland, and was graduated from the 
Maryland Agricultural College, later 
incorporated as part of the Universiu 
of Maryland. He attended the Univer- 
sity's School of Law and was admitted 
to the Maryland Bar in 1912. 

Following his service as a captain in 
the infantry during World War I. Judge 
Cole returned to Towson to practice law 
until 1926, when he was elected to the 
United States House of Representatives. 
Defeated for the 1929-30 term, he was 
elected again in 1930 and served in the 
House of Representatives continuous!) 
until 1942 when he resigned to accept 
an appointment as Judge of the United 
States Customs Court in New York. 

From 1933 to 1942. Judge Cole 
headed a subcommittee for the Com- 
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Com- 
merce investigating the Nation's petro- 
leum industry. He was elected speaker 
pro tern of the House during the 76th 
Congress. He was named Judge of the 
United States Court of Customs and 
Patent Appeals here in July, 1952. 
Judge Cole also served as a member ot 
the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 

Judge Cole is survived by his widow 
Their only son. William P. Cole. III. 
was killed in action in France during 
World War II. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



15 




The second in a series of arti- 
cles by Mr. De Marr detailing 
various aspects of the Univer- 
sity's rich and colorful past. 



\/< Dowell Hull, the main building of St. John's College, was intended 

to be the Governor's Mansion when construction was begun before 
the American Revolution. 



An Earlier University 

Higher Education in Maryland before 1807 

By 
Frederick S. De Marr 
Assistant Dean of Men 




The Rev. Dr. William Smith, first principal 
of Washington College. 



H'GHER EDUCATION IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND did not re- 
ceive attention until during the American Revolution. Most 
of the children of the wealthy were returned to Europe, 
while a few pursued their advanced studies at such institu- 
tions as Princeton, Columbia and William and Mary. The 
first institution of collegiate rank in the State was established 
in 1782 when the General Assembly passed "An ACT for 
founding a college at Chester-town," to be known as Wash- 
ington College, "in honourable and perpetual memory of his 
Excellency General Washington, the illustrious and virtuous 
commander in chief of the armies of the United States." 

Two years later, the Western Shoremen, not to be outdone 
by their brethren across the bay, secured passage of "An 
ACT for founding a college on the western shore of this 
state, and constituting the same, together with Washington 
College on the eastern shore, into one university, by the name 
of The University of Maryland." Thus we had the establish- 
ment of St. John's College at Annapolis, an outgrowth of 
King William's School which was founded in 1696. This 
action on the part of General Assembly brings into full view 
a rivalry which has existed during most of Maryland's history 
between the Eastern and Western Shores. The preamble of 



the law constituting Washington College clearly stated that 
the establishment of a college or university in the state had 
been hindered by the question of its location. They suggested 
however, that each shore be permitted to establish a college 
which afterwards could be constituted into a university 
through common consent. In general, this was the plan 
followed. 

St. John's and Washington Colleges were established as 
separate schools each with its own Principal, faculty and 
Board of Visitors and Governors. Although private subscrip- 
tions were the principal source of revenue, the State did pro- 
vide for an annual appropriation, to be secured by certain 
special taxes levied for this purpose. It is interesting to note 
that the 1784 act establishing St. John's and the "University 
of Maryland" more nearly resembles an alcoholic beverage 
control law, since this commodity was to provide the tax 
monies for their support each year. 

St. John's received from the State, in addition to its charter 
and funds, an unfinished building in Annapolis known as 
"Bladen's Folly" which was originally intended to be the 
Governor's Mansion. This edifice was later named McDowell 
Hall in honor of the first Principal, Dr. John McDowell. 



16 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



, 7 B|, LAW8 of MARYLAND*. 

At a SESSION of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
of MARYLAND, begun and held at the city of 
Annapolis, on Monday the firlt ot November, 
in the year of our Lord one thoufnnd (even hundred 
and eighty-four, and ended the nd day of Janu- 
ary, feventcen hundred and eighty-five : The fol- 
lowing laws were enacted. 

"William Paca, £(q; Governor. 

C H A P. XXXVII. 
An ACT foT founding a college on the weAem fhore of thit ftate, 
and conforming the lame, together with Wafhington college on 
the eaftcrn fhore, into one univerfity, by the name of The 
Univerfity of Maryland. 

HEREAS inftitutions for the liberal education of youth in the prin- 
ciples of virtue, knowledge, and ufcful literature, are of the hipheft 
benefit to focietv, in order to train up and perpetuate a fucceCion'W 

•ble 



w 



Excerpts from the Laws of Maryland, establishing the University of Maryland. 



Hodson Hall, Washington College. 
This year, the College celebrates its 1 75th anniversary. 




The outstanding educator of this early period was the 
Reverend Dr. William Smith, the first Principal of Washing- 
ton College. Smith came from Philadelphia in 1779 to be- 
come rector of Chester Parish and Principal of the Kent 
County School, the college's forerunner. While in Philadel- 
phia, this cleric solicited funds from England which he used 
to found the College of Philadelphia, later to become the 
University of Pennsylvania. He served as the first Provost 
of this institution. Dr. Smith held honorary degrees from 
Aberdeen, Dublin and Oxford and in 1783 was elected Bishop 
of Maryland but was never consecrated. He returned to 
Philadelphia and was associated with the University of Penn- 
sylvania until his death. 

What ever became of the first University of Maryland? 
The Act of 1784 provided that each college should appoint 
seven visitors and governors to serve along with two faculty 
members as the "Convocation of the University of Mary- 
land." The Governor was designated as Chancellor to pre- 
side over this body which would meet alternately on the 
Eastern and Western Shores. The convocation was charged 
with the responsibility of adopting by-laws which would bring 
uniformity in the areas of literature used by the colleges, the 



conferring of degrees and university honors, and the hearing 
of student appeals. At no time could any of these rules 
infringe upon the rights of the individual colleges as granted 
by their charters. 

No attempt was made to carry out the organization of the 
university until a meeting was held in Annapolis in Novem- 
ber, 1790. Nothing was accomplished at this meeting or at 
the one held in the following Spring at which only the St. 
John's respresentatives appeared. 

Thus the first "University of Maryland" died a natural 
death. Lack of interest and sectional rivalry could be listed 
as the major causes. Subsequent withdrawal of State financial 
support in 1806 was another influence. It remained for the 
now prospering city of Baltimore to establish a true university 
which would become a permanent fixture in the life oi the 
State and its citizens. 

Sources: 

Laws of Maryland, SINCE 1763. ETC., ANNAPOI is: 1787. 
Maryland's Established Church BY NtLSON W. RlGHTMYER. 
University of Maryland ( Vol UME 1 ) BY EuGl Nl F. CORDI l l . 
Pillars of Maryland BY F. SIMMS McGRATH. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



17 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



Maryland's Football Fortunes Zoom 
Following Rout of North Carolina 



Q UEEN ELIZABETH'S CAREFULLY 

planned schedule at Maryland was 
slightly disrupted Saturday, October 19 
at Byrd Stadium as the Terp football 
team, delirious after they rallied for a 
21-7 victory over North Carolina, 
tossed protocol to the wind by present- 
ing their happy coach, Tommy Mont, 
to Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip. 
I o the red-shirted Maryland players, 
it was the only way to cap a great day 
pf revenge over Jim Tatum, the former 
I erp coach who had persuaded many 
of them to come to Maryland for their 
education and to play football for him. 
The Queen and the others in the royal 
party had not choice but to accept their 
spontaneous discarding of protocol. 

As a beaming and wild-eyed crowd 
of 43,000 stood patiently, awaiting the 
departure of the royal party, Mont 
walked up for a handshake with the 
Queen, climaxing a day he said, "I will 
revel in for the rest of my life." 

Maryland, victim of several crushing 
breaks in the first half and trailing 7-0, 
roared back with it finest performance 
in two years under Mont. 

Byrd Stadium was jumpin' with the 
deep-throated roars that must have 
brought memories to Tatum of his 
great teams as the Terps perked up in 
the second half. They overwhelmed the 
Tarheels with a jazzed-up offense, a 
brillant defense, and spectacular touch- 
down productions. 

Earlier, the day seemed gloomy for 
the Terps, with a 7-0 half-time deficit. 
A break gave the latum eleven its first 
score and a penalty nullified an almost 
inevitable tying touchdown by the Red 
and White just before the half ended. 

But the Terps drew even in the third 

18 



quarter as they drove 38 yards for the 
score, with Bob Rusevlyan, who en- 
joyed his best day of all at quarterback 
sneaking over from one yard out to 
make it 7-6. John Fritsch then calmly 
put the ball squarely through the bars 
with a great extra point. The touch- 
down was set up by trickery and mag- 
nificent execution of plays, highlighted 
by the exciting runs of the newest soph- 
omore sensation, Gene Verardi. 

The tie was broken by Ted Kershner. 
who was set free by great blocks by 
soph guard Rodney Breedlove and 
junior halfback Bob Layman. He sped 
81 yards in the fourth quarter to put 
the Terps in front. Again, Fritsch made 
the situation look more safe with an- 
other true extra point to make it 14-7. 
And the icing was put on the cake with 
a quick opening thrust up the middle 
from 13 yards out by sophomore full- 
back Jim Joyce. This capped a 67-yard 
drive led by the key running of Verardi 
and a 25-yard jaunt by senior right 
half Fred Hamilton. 

Maryland was the positive aggressor 
in the second half, and once the Terps 
took the lead, there was no doubt as 
to the winner. They were alive, out- 
hustling the team that had gained na- 
tional attention on a comeback built on 
hustle. 

Maryland boasted countless stars in 
addition to the touchdown markers. 
They included Verardi, Rusevlyan, and 
Dickie Lewis, ends Ben Scotti and Ed 
Cooke; tackles Fred Cole and Don 
Healy, and most noticeable Breedlove. 

For his great play in helping to upset 
the Tarheels, Breedlove was honored by 
the Associated Press as runner-up for 
the nation's top lineman of the week 



and was named the "Player of the 
Week" in the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence. Verardi, who had won Conference 
"Player of the Week" for his great play 
in the 27-0 win over Wake Forest the 
previous week, was again mentioned in 
the nominations for the honor for the 
second straight week. 

Ted Kershner's 81 -yard scoring gal- 
lop was voted International News Serv- 
ices's "Play of the Week" and Coach 
Mont's quote after the game won the 
Associated Press "Quote of the Week" 
recognition. It was simply, after asked 
who was great for him in the victory 
against Tatum: "Everyone, Everyone!" 

Oct. 1 2, Maryland met Wake Forest's 
Deacons and emerged with their first 
win of the season, 27-0. In the second 
quarter, Fritsch hit Verardi with a 40- 
yard pass that took the Terps to the 
Wake Forest 18. Five plays later, 
Fritsch sneaked over the one-yard line 
for the first Maryland score. 

For the second touchdown, the Terps 
slashed their way to a first down on the 
three. Fullback John Forbes hit the line 
for two and reached pay dirt on his 
second try. After receiving a pass from 
Bob Rusevlyan on the Deacon 19-yard 
line. Howie Dare faked two Deacon's 
out of position, found he had a clear 
field into the end zone, and accounted 
for the third touchdown. 

With nine seconds remaining in the 
contest, Verardi added insult to injury. 
He ran behind Wake Forest defenders 
to grab a pass from Dickie Lewis on 
the Deacon ten-yard line and, without 
breaking stride, went into the end zone, 
making the final score, 27-0. 

Fritsch who had engaged in only 
seven plays in previous games, con- 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ncctcd with five of 1 2 passes lor a 
total of 85 yards — more yardage than 
any other passer had gained so far in 
the season. Howie Dare, starting lefl 
halfback and honorary captain for the 
Wake Forest game, picked up 42 yards 
in ten carries. 

Maryland's 1956 gridiron edition 
opened its campaign with an exciting 
performance with the Nation's second 
ranked Texas A&M team in the Cotton 
Bowl in Dallas with approximately 83 
million fans watching their great effort. 
The Aggies were supposed to romp 
all over the rebuilding Red and White 
team of Coach Tommy Mont, but the 
pre-season glitter of the Aggies only 
helped to bolster the effort of the under- 
dog Terrapins. As TV-Game of the 
Week across the nation, the College 
Parkers were heralded for the way they 
handled the fine Aggie eleven. First it 
was 7-0 A&M and then the Terps tied 
the score on a 3-yard sneak by quarter- 
back Dickie Lewis. Late in the third 
period, the Aggies again moved in 
front, but soon were shaken as Howie 
Dare scored on a four yard run. With 
the big chance for the tie, John Fritsch 
had his extra point try blocked by the 
big star of the game for the Aggies, 
Jim Osborne who sneaked in from the 
right corner unnoticed. It looked as 
though the three-touchdown favorites 
were going to settle for the one-point 
victory and gladly, but a poor Terrapin 
punt gave them a chance from our 20- 
yard line. With 50 seconds remaining, 
they passed for a score and made what 
looked like a 14-13 ball game end in a 
21-13 victory for former Maryland 
coach Paul Bryant. The Terrapin de- 
fense excelled, led by tackle Fred Cole. 
"The Bear" as Bryant is known, said 
after the game that he felt fortunate to 
get by the Terps and complimented 
Mont on the job he did for preparing 
the young Terp squad for his mighty 
Aggies. The effort was lauded by those 
who watched on television, especially 
the Terp students and fans who couldn't 
make the long trip to Dallas. 

Then came the first home game of 
the season and a big and enthusiastic 
crowd turned out in Byrd Stadium to 
welcome the '57 Terps. What happened 
that afternoon hasn't yet been dis- 
covered and possibly never will as the 
Terps lost 48-13 to N. C. State, their 
worst defeat in thirteen years. How- 
ever, the fans did see two of the 
nation's finest halfbacks in Dick Christy 
and Dick Hunter. Both, with continued 
State success, will be all-Americas. 

Taking the road again, the Red and 
White once more went up against a 
powerhouse in Duke University, one of 




State piles it on lint for some there wen compensations. 



our fellow schools of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference who were ranked the 
fourth top team in the nation. As they 
went into the game, they found them- 
selves three-touchdown underdogs, but 
came up with another great effort and 
held the Blue Devils of Coach Bill 
Murray to one score until the final 
seven seconds of the game. The final 
read 14-0, but Mont's team wasn't em- 
barrassed as they were the previous 
week. They came up with great all- 
around play against a team that had 
the biggest line seen in college foot- 
ball in many years. The Terps missed 
several golden opportunities, but 
couldn't muster the attack needed to 
dent the Duke goal line. With the 
Blue and White leading 7-0 after an 
early first period score, Maryland got 
to the Duke 20 yard line in the second 
stanza but couldn't make a necessary 
first down to continue the drive. Again 
in the third quarter, the Terps were 
inside the 30-yard line of the Blue 
Devils, but again missed a first down 
by inches. It was in the final period 
that Duke put on a sustained march 
and scored on the final offensive play 
of the game. There was time for the 
kickoff and that was all. But it wasn't 
the rout that so many had predicted. 
And so. at this writing, the Terps were 
preparing for TV once more with the 
Wake Forest Demon Deacons visiting 
Byrd Stadium in the first regional tele- 
cast of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
The game was seen from Baltimore 
through the South to Miami. It was be- 
lieved after the Duke game that the 
Terps might be on their way to winning 
and with three games at home, includ- 
ing the visit of the Royal couple. Queen 



Elizabeth and Prince Philip, the chances 
were good. 

Outstanding players in the first games 
had to be co-captain Gene Alderton at 
center; tackles Kurt Schwarz and Fred 
Cole; guards Paul Tonetti and Tom 
Gunderman, and halfback Howie Dare. 
Newcomers Schwarz, Gunderman. 
guard Rodney Breedlove and fullbacks 
Jim Joyce and John Forbes caught the 
coaches and fans as being future stars. 



A FINE HONOR WAS GIVEN UNIVKRIM n 

of Maryland athletes when the Atlan- 
tic Coast Conference Sports Writers 
Association named Maryland winner of 
its first annual sportsmanship troph\ 

The trophy was presented with royal 
treatment as Frank Spencer. Sports 
Editor of the Winston-Salem Journal 
and President of the writers' organiza- 
tion, made the award in a pre-game 
ceremony before the "Queen's Game" 
with North Carolina. Her Majesty, 
Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip 
watched the presentation from their 
special seats on the sideline. Spencer 
presented the trophy to Howard Miller. 
President of the University's Student 
Government Association. 

The winner was selected by votes of 
players and officials who worked Atlan- 
tic Coast Conference football and 
basketball games during the 1956-57 
season. 

Primary consideration was the treat- 
ment host team players and fans gave 
visiting players. Players and officials 
filed reports alter each game. 

The trophy will rotate each year. 
Maryland received a permanent plaque 
as its award to keep. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



19 



University's Program 
for Physical Fitness 
Continued from page 13 



gaining an understanding of body me- 
chanics and how to use one's body 
more efficiently in daily work and play 
skills. Throughout the course, there 
is emphasis placed upon the meaning 
of physical education and its contribu- 
tion to the total education of the in- 
dividual. A final portion deals with 
learning some of the fundamental as- 
pects of sports for men and especially 
those which are commonly found in 
intercollegiate athletics; learning to ap- 
preciate sports from a spectator's point 
of view also is one of the objectives. 
Every attempt is made in this course 
to give the student guidance in the 
selection of other courses which she 
may select to fill the requirement in 
physical education. The bases of this 
selection are her health status, her past 
experience, and ability in sports or 
dance, her own particular needs for 
activity and her interest in pursuing 
other activities. 

These programs for men and women 
are based on the results of a project 
undertaken by leaders from the Ameri- 
can Association for Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation; The College 
Physical Education Association; and the 
National Association for Physical Edu- 
cation for College Women. The results 
of this conference, known as the Wash- 
ington Conference Report, were based 
upon the objectives of the President's 
Conference on Higher Education, and 
were published as a guide for required 
physical education for men and women 
in the colleges and universities of the 
United States. 

Proof of how students themselves 
feel about their two-year required train- 
ing was revealed in an attitude study 
conducted in 1955. Some 153 Sopho- 
mores who had completed their physi- 
cal education requirements were asked 
to comment honestly on the values, if 
any, accrued to them. A composite 
of all comments read something like 
this: 

"As a result of my experience in 
the two-year 'service' program, I 
feel that I have increased my 
skill in and enjoyment of physical 
activities; increased my use of 
physical activity to release ten- 
sions; become a more apprecia- 
tive spectator and have become 
more aware of the importance of 
planning some part of each day 

20 



for recreation and/or relaxation." 

Although the foregoing appears some- 

what stilted and official, it represents 

the honest opinions of the majority of 

students surveyed. 

These new offerings are designed to 
make the following unique contribution 
to the total education of all college 
students: 

1. An understanding and apprecia- 
tion of the body and its move- 
ment. 

2. The development of skills and 
knowledges in a variety of physi- 
cal activities which the student 
can use now and in his leisure 
time in later life. 

3. An appreciation and understand- 
ing of exercise and its role in 
each individual's life. 

4. A provision for each student to 
release many of the individual 
tensions created by living in a 
complex society. 

5. An informal atmosphere where 
students have an opportunity to 
know and better understand each 
other. 

The College as a representative of 
the University believes that total edu- 
cation includes the education of the 
body in physical skills which lead to 
a richer and more meaningful life. 



Campus Notes 

Continued from page 7 



Conference on Juvenile Delinquency, 
the Hospital Management Institute, the 
Law Enforcement Institute, the Mary- 
land Education Conference, etc. Sev- 
eral such conferences and institutes 
have become annual affairs. 

The philosophy of CSCS is to serve 
the university-level educational needs of 
the people of the State and to serve 
those needs of adults wherever they 
may arise whenever no other agency 
exists or is willing to meet those needs. 
It is the policy of CSCS to entertain any 
request for higher educational oppor- 
tunities submitted by individual citizens 
and/or groups of citizens of the State. 
The College is constantly expanding its 
capabilities and facilities to meet the 
increased requests for educational op- 
portunities throughout the State. 

COLOR-TV CIRCUIT 

The first experimental use of color tele- 
vision to teach an academic subject was 
inaugurated Oct. 15 as a scheduled 
undertaking of the Advisory Board on 
Education of the National Academy of 



Sciences. The new closed-circuit color 
TV facility at Walter Reed Army Medi- 
cal Center will be employed to teach 
the concepts of calculus to a group of 
inservice high-school teachers of mathe- 
matics and science in the Washington, 
D. C area. 

The color-television studio at 
WRAMC is exceptionally well equipped 
and is customarily used for medical 
demonstrations. 

The course, which will extend 
throughout the academic year, will be 
offered by the University of Maryland 
as "Foundations of Analysis" (Math. 
184). The faculty will award three 
hours of graduate credit to those who 
successfully complete the course of 26 
televised 50-minute lectures and cor- 
related classwork. Classrooms receiving 
the relayed programs will be made 
available at the Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center in Washington and at 
the National Institutes of Health, 
Bethesda. 

Trail-blazing lecturer will be Dr. R. 
A. Good, Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics at the University. Dr. John R. 
Mayor, Director of Education for the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science and a professional 
mathematician will serve as consultant 
in the preparation and presentation of 
material. 

The WRAMC Television Division, 
under the direction of Dr. Paul W. 
Schafer, will serve as technical pro- 
ducers and consultants in the adaptation 
of classroom material. 

In announcing the pilot program. Dr. 
Randall M. Whaley, Executive Director 
of the Advisory Board on Education, 
declared, "Never before has there been 
such an opportunity to present and 
evaluate televised instruction under 
optimum technical conditions. Together 
with the unique color facilities available 
at Walter Reed, we shall have the ad- 
vice and support of a production and 
technical staff with unparalleled ex- 
perience in the day-to-day use of live 
color television as an instrument of 
teaching." 

televised lectures. These color kine- 
scopes offer the opportunity for com- 
parison of various techniques and are 
essential to evaluation of the experi- 
ment. They will later be made available 
to other suitably equipped institutions 
for further evaluation tests with student 
audiences. 

USAF PRESENTS SCROLL OF APPRECIA- 
TION TO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Lieutenant General Emmett O'Donnell, 
Jr.. Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff 
for Personnel, recently awarded the 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



University of Maryland a Scroll of 
Appreciation for its "meritorious serv- 
ice in providing a world-wide educa- 
tional Program for military personnel 
on active duty." University President 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins received the 
award in a Pentagon ceremony. 

The Air Force Scroll, signed by 
James H. Douglas, Secretary of the 
Air Force, and General Nathan F. 
Twining, Chief of Staff, credited the 
foresight and courage of the University 
in providing college-level educational 
opportunities to thousands of American 
men and women in uniform. It further 
stated that "the availability of ac- 
credited and transferrable college-level 
work for military personnel on active 
duty has increased the morale and 
efficiency within the Air Force, thereby 
augmenting the retention rates of 
trained officers and airmen." 



ALUMNI 
CLUB NEWS 



BALTIMORE CLUB 
Samuel L. Silber, President of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Club of 
Baltimore, met recently with the Plan- 
ning Committee of the Club to arrange 
the group activities for the 1957-58 sea- 
son. 

Members of the Planning Commit- 
tee are: Dr. Eugene Pessagno, Mem- 
bership Chairman, Dr. Frank Slama 
and Dr. Sam Goldstein, Co-Chairmen 
of Arrangements; Miss Loraine Neel, 
Roster Chairman; and Dr. B. Olive 
Cole, Secretary of the Club. 

The program for the year will fea- 
ture an evening of entertainment on 
Thursday. November 21 at the Park 
Plaza Hotel, at which new members 
and prospective members of the Club 
will be honored guests. A luncheon 
early in January when the Board of 
Regents of the University of Maryland 
will be honored, and the Annual Meet- 
ing and election of officers, the first 
week in June, will be highlights of the 
year. 

Mr. Silber's ambition as President is 
to increase the membership of the Club 
by 100%. The slogan for the year is 
"Every Member Get a Member." 

NEW YORK CLUB 
Approximately 100 alumni of the Uni- 
versity met in the Harvard Club, New 
York City, September 21, to view the 
University of Maryland, Texas A. and 
M. football game. 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



Attending from College Park were 
David L. Brigham. DireCtOl ol Alumni 
Relations; Victor Holm, Alumni Field 
Secretary; George Fogg, Directoi ol 
Personnel; and Jack Gywnn, Alumni 
Fund Director. 

The meeting was sponsored bj the 
New York Club. Co-chairmen lor the 
event were Hal McGa) and Jinnie 
Bennett. 

M CLUB 
The University of Maryland M Club 
will hold its annual banquet at the 
Hotel Statler, Washington, on Decem- 
ber 14. This affair is open to the public. 
Those men attending are encouraged to 
bring their wives or girl friends. 

Mr. C. Robert Boucher is the Ban- 
quet Chairman. He has selected Dr. 
Lawrence Smallwood as his Program 
Director. Mr. Milton Mulitz is the 
Ticket Chairman. 

The Master of Ceremonies for the 
evening will be the Radio and Television 
personality, Mr. Morric Siegel. This 
gentleman brings with him a great repu- 
tation as a Toastmaster. 

General Curtis E. LeMay has been 
selected by the M Club as its outstand- 
ing "Man of the Year." Gen. LeMay, 
who is Vice Chief of Staff of the U. S. 
Air Force, will attend the banquet to 
receive the Distinguished Service Award. 
At the same time, he will be made an 
honorary M Club member. 

For their "Athlete of the Year" the 
M Club has selected the Washington 
Senator's outstanding left fielder, Mr. 
Roy Sievers. Mr. Sievers has made a 
great comeback in baseball and this 
year is the American League home run 
king and holder of the runs batted in 
title. This man will be a welcome addi- 
tion to the M Club honorary list. 

The banquet will also feature the in- 
stallation of three living Maryland-born 
athletes into the Maryland State Hall 
of Fame. This part of the program is 
under the direction of Mr. Joseph Deck- 
man. Jimmy Foxx, Lefty Grove and 
Homerun Baker are some of the men 
previously installed in the Hall of Fame. 
Other awards to be given to the out- 
standing athletes of our school will be 
the Talbot Speer Award, the Charles P. 
McCormick A ward and the A . V. 
WAlliams-Delmarva A ward. 

This banquet will also feature the 
inauguration of the Bill Guckyson 
Award. Bill Guckyson was one of the 
most outstanding athletes ever to attend 
the University. It will therefore be only 
fitting that this award be given to that 
individual who fits the award. Captain 
Bill Guckyson gave his life in defense 
of his country after gaining a commis- 
sion at the U. S. Military Academy. 



c "ollege of 
AGRICULTU Kl 

I /( II.. Indian 



DR. M \l hum hi PR1 sidi S( <■ ol 
c -i \s will) 

On September 1st, just 23W years to 
the daj aftei he came to ( yanamid 
as a young scientist. l)i Wilbui <■ 
Malcolm, Agriculture '22. was elected 
the Company's fifth president. I bus 
he becomes chief executive officer at 

the vcr> dawn ol (\ an. mud's second 

half century. 

Dr. Malcolm is a scientist and admin- 
istrator, with an experienced under- 
standing of the entire area ol modern 
marketing. As scientist, shortly alter 
joining Cyanamid he developed a new 
method whereby dozens of forms of 
antipneumococci sera could be pro- 
duced quickly and in large amounts — 
at a time when they were in urgent 
demand. 

As administrator, his record is bril- 
liant. At the age of 36 and only four 
years after joining Cyanamid. he be- 
came Executive Director of the Com- 
pany's wholly-owned subsidiary, Lederle 
Laboratories. Inc. In 1944 he was 
elected a member of Cyanamid's Board 
of Directors. In 1946 he was appointed 
a Cyanamid Vice President and General 
Manager of the newly-formed Lederle 
Laboratories Division. In 1955 he was 
given staff responsibility for Company- 
wide sales, market development and 
commercialization of new products and 
processes. This year he was elected to 
the Executive Committee. 

Dr. Malcolm has served as Chair- 
man of the Commercial Development 
Committee, Vice Chairman of the 
Budget Committee. Vice Chairman of 
the Patents and Licenses Committee, 
and a member of the Finance Commit- 
tee. 

Among his professional affiliations 
are an honorary membership in the 
International College of Surgeons, a life 
membership in the New York Academy 
of Sciences, and membership in the 
American Society o( Bacteriologists. 

Known among his friends as "Weed", 
a name given him in his teens because 
he grew so fast, Dr. Malcolm was born 
in Moscow Mills. Md. He received 
his B.S. degree in Bacteriology, his 
M.S. degree, and his Ph.D. at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm and their 
two sons. Bryant and Peter, live in a 
3-story stucco house overlooking the 
(Continued on next page) 

21 




THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over TOO years 

WASHINGTON 3, D.C. 

BALTIMORE 6, MD. 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 



JOHN W. SINGER 

-MADE TO MEASURE— 

NURSES UNIFORMS 

FOR NURSES OF 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 



120 Forrest Drive 
Rl 7-6575 

Baltimore, Md 




Hudson River in Grand View-on- 
Hudson, N. Y., not far from the Pearl 
River plant where he began his career 
at Cyanamid. 

Kenneth C. Towe, Cyanamid's fourth 
president and its guiding hand through 
the past five and one-half years of 
reorganization, moves up to the new 
post of Chairman of the Board of Di- 
rectors, a position created so that his 
invaluable service to the Company 
might be continued. 

HOLDS HIGH OFFICE 

Mr. P. W. Chichester, '20, was unani- 
mously re-elected to a one-year term as 
Vice Chairman of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the American Feed Manufactur- 
ers Association. The election took place 
at the annual meeting of the Board dur- 
ing AFMA's annual meeting in Chicago. 
Mr. Chichester is also Vice President of 
Dietrich & Gambrill in Frederick, 
Maryland. 

COMPLETES COURSE 

Army 2d Lt. Richard J. Ponds, Jr., 
recently completed a four-month pri- 
mary flight training course at Gary 
Army Air Field, Camp Gary, Texas. 
Lieutenant Ponds will now go to Fort 
Rucker, Alabama for advanced tactical 
training. He entered the Army in 1951. 



PARTICIPATES IN SYMPOSIUM 

Dr. George M. Beal, of the Department 
of Agriculture Economics, participated 
in the tenth annual Commodity Market- 
ing Symposium sponsored by the Chi- 
cago Board of Trade, September 4-6, 
1957. Dr. Beal was one of 80 educa- 
tors to be present, coming from 60 
schools and 30 states. 



LAND WEEK OBSERVANCE 

Everyone has a stake in our land and 
this year's Maryland Land Week obser- 
vance, October 6-12, gave nearly every- 
one a chance to plan an event or 
activity centered around the land and 
related resources. 

Included in the groups and organiza- 
tions invited by the Land Week Com- 
mittee to take part in the observance 
were homemakers clubs, garden clubs, 
FFA chapters and 4-H clubs. Farm 
Bureau, Grange and other rural organ- 
izations, church and religious organiza- 
tions, boy scouts, sportsman, hunting, 
fishing, archery and rifle clubs and 
schools and educational organizations. 
To help the various groups and organ- 
izations plan a proper observance, the 



MORE and more GLASS 
CONTAINERS are being 
used for more and more 
food products. 

For YOUR family's MILK supply 
— do you insist on the advantages 
of GLASS BOTTLES? You want 
to SEE the wholesome goodness 
and the amount you have on hand. 

At Home — At School — Anywhere 
you use MILK — ask that it be 
served in GLASS BOTTLES. 

They are rigid and substantial and 
do not produce leakage and seep- 
ing in refrigerators or on floors 
and clothing. 



MILK IS BETTER 
IN GLASS BOTTLES 



THE BUCK GLASS 

COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30. Md. 

Originators of the Square 
Milk Bottle 



Look for the Sign 



MARIA'S 



Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 



Open 11 a.m. to 4 on 
300 Albemarle St. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



— Closed Mondays 
MU 5-2811 
MU 5-2812 



22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Land Week committee published a 
booklet of suggestions for educational 
and entertaining activities. The booklet 
was prepared by Harry W. Dengler. 
Extension forester and a member of the 
Committee. Starting with 18 suggestions 
for homemakers clubs, Dengler com- 
piled more than 130 suggestions for 
activities during Land Week. Included 
are such activities as developing land- 
scape plans for schools, having exchange 
visits between town and country people, 
visits to the local source of water supply, 
having foresters put on a forest fire 
prevention and fighting program and 
demonstration and holding special 
church services relating to stewardship 
of the land. 



GRADUATE RECEIVES NEWSPAPER AWARD 

The Maryland Gazette was awarded the 
honor of being the outstanding paper of 
the year 1957 by the National News- 
paper Promotion Association, which 
includes the United States and Canada. 
The Maryland Gazette is the oldest 
paper in the United States, having been 
published for 230 years and being 
founded in 1727. Mr. Talbot T. Speer, 
'17, is the publisher and owner of the 
paper. Mr. Speer's papers, totalling 
eight and covering the western shores 
of Maryland with headquarters in 
Annapolis, have fought continuously 
for sound American principles having 
re-celebrated this past June the "Burn- 
ing of the Peggy Stewart" as a protest 
against the high taxes and expenditures 
of the Federal Government. 



JOINS CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Dr. G. Lynn Romoser, Ph.D., '54, 
joined the Development Department of 
Monsanto Chemical Company's Organic 
Chemicals Division at St. Louis on 
November 1, after having been an As- 
sistant Professor of Nutrition in the 
Poultry Department at the University 
of Maryland since 1947. 



BOOK OF TREES 

Mr. Fred W. Besley, '92, has published 
a booklet containing pictures of fine 
old trees which are outstanding for their 
size. Mr. Besley, who for many years 
was State Forester, found many of the 
owners of these trees to be interested in 
displaying them. As a result he drew 
up a Noted Tree List for Maryland. 
The list grew and the present publica- 
tion is an outgrowth of it, serving as a 
permanent record. Its title is Big Tree 
Champions of Maryland. 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



YOU CAN JUDGE 
FOR YOURSELF 

If you are considering a trusl for the future benefit 
of your family, why not place some of your assets 
in a Living Trust with the Lirst National Hank — 
while you are here to watch our performance? 

The income may he paid to you or to anyone you 
name. You can change or end the agreement at any 
time. Meanwhile, it will give you an excellent oppor- 
tunity to observe and judge for yourself how satis- 
factory such an arrangement can be. 

Ask your lawyer to explain the legal requirements. 
One of our Trust Officers will gladly talk with you 
about the financial and business aspects of such a 
trust. We believe you will find it well worth in- 
vestigating. 



The FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of BALTIMORE 

Capital, surplus and profits in excess of $23,000,000. 





23 




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AVIGNONE FRERES 

Town and Country 
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Luncheons - Teas - Dinners 
Wedding & Cocktail Receptions 



Candy and Other Delicacies 
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Restaurant 

Luncheons - Dinners 
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Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

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Lincoln 3-6660 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Lois Eld Ernest 



GOOD NEIGHBOR PHILOSOPHY CONGRESS 

Two members of the Maryland faculty 
participated in the Fifth Inter-American 
Congress of Philosophy held in Wash- 
ington this summer. Dr. Leonora C. 
Rosenfield read a paper on The Peri- 
patetic Adversaries of Cartesianism in 
17th Century France and Dr. Thelma 
Z. Lavine, Assistant Professor of Phi- 
losophy, spoke on The Genetic Fallacy 
and the Sciences of Man. The leading 
Mexican philosopher, Dr. Jose Vas- 
concelos, was pleased to learn that his 
writings had been the subject of a 
thesis by a Maryland graduate student 
in Spanish, William Pugh. 

DR. CUNZ TO OHIO STATE 

Dr. Dieter Cunz, for eighteen years a 
member of the Foreign Language De- 
partment, has gone to Ohio State Uni- 
versity to become head of the German 
Department. Sabbatical leave has been 
granted to Dr. Alfred Bingham for re- 
search work at the National Library 
in Paris and to Dr. Leonora Rosenfield 
for the preparation of a volume of the 
letters of the late Morris Cohen, Amer- 
ican philosopher. 

TWO NEW BOOKS 

Dr. Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., Professor 
of Microbiology, is Chairman of the 
Committee on Bacteriological Tech- 
nique of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists. This Committee, under 
his chairmanship, has written a book 
entitled Manual of Microbiological 
Methods, to be published September, 
1957 by the McGraw-Hill Book Co., 
Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Dr. Raymond N. Doetsch, Associate 
Professor of Microbiology, is one of 
the authors of a new text entitled Dairy 
Microbiology. The book deals with the 
relationship of microbiology to the 
dairy industry and associates the appli- 
cations of microbiology to the pertinent 
phases of this field. 

RESERVE OFFICER OVERSEAS 

Colonel John R. Mitchell, '33, recently 
returned to the United States after com- 
pleting a special two-week tour of active 
duty with the United States Air Forces 



C*veru ZJable \Jverioohs 
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LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 

(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR BRIDGE PARTIES, 
WEDDINGS, BANQUETS. CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Space — 

PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gertrude Allison Brewster, Owner 



Jfuller & b'&lbert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 
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MOTORISTS 

If you wish to save fuel, 
Take your car to A. J. Buell. 
He can tune your motor, too, 
So it will run just like new. 

BUELL CARBURETOR & 

IGNITION SERVICE 

10th St., N.W. 



24 



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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Hotel 

HEDIN HOUSE 

WASHINGTON'S NEWEST HOTEL 

Nearest the University 

Just three miles airay and tiro 
blocks within the District line. 



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Bank of Maryland 

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— Branches — 

BOWIE - CAPITOL HEIGHTS 

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SUITLAND CENSUS FACILITY 



in Europe, during which he and a 
group of five other key reservists visited 
USAFE bases in Germany, France and 
the United Kingdom. While at the Uni- 
versity, the Colonel majored in the 
biological sciences and also completed 
four years of ROTC training for 
which he was commissioned a 2nd l.t. 
in the Reserves. He has been in the 
insurance business in Baltimore since 
1938. 



ALUMNI ACROSS THE NATION 

John Cortland Haddcr, who received 
his B.S. and his M.Ed, from the Uni- 
versity, was recently awarded the Ph.D. 
degree in botany and plant pathology 
by Michigan State University. 

Alfred Viola, '55, has been ap- 
pointed Assistant Professor of Chemis- 
try at Northeastern University, ( Boston, 
Mass.) effective September 1, 1957, 
President Carl S. Ell announced. 

Burt N. Singleton, Jr., physicist, has 
joined the Guided Missile Research 
Division, The Ramo-Wooldridge Cor- 
poration, Los Angeles, California. Mr. 
Singleton served as a graduate assistant 
and received his M.S. in physics from 
the University. 

Dr. Frederick William Zechman, Jr., 
who received his master's degree from 
the University of Maryland joined 
Miami University's faculty as Assistant 



Professor ol Physiolog) in September. 
He is a member of Sigma Xi hon. 
science fraternity. Also at Miami I 

versity is Dr. Robert J Brad) who re- 
ceived his Ph D. degree this sear from 
the University of Maryland Me h.is 
been named saint. w\ office! and Assist- 
ant Professor of Bacteriology. 

WHARTON in M I -si \H OAM1 

Al Wharton, who played tackle toi tin. 
University's football team, participated 
in the annual All-Stai Game againsl the 
New York Giants at Soldiers Field, 

Chicago, Illinois, on August l >th. Dur- 
ing his senior year. Wharton was picked 
on numerous Honorable Mention All 
American teams. He also participated 
in two Sugar Bowl games and the post- 
season Blue-Gray classic. Academically, 
his major subject was history. Wharton 
entered the Navy in February and is 
now working in the Design Division of 
the Public Works Division at the Naval 
Training Center, Bainbridge, Maryland. 

THE DRAMA WING 

As a service to the State of Maryland, 
the Department of Speech and Dramatic 
Art has formed a new organization 
known as The Drama Wing. Mr. E. 
Thomas Starcher is the Director. The 
purpose of the Drama Wing is to utilize 
(Continued on next page) 



Extra COMFORT 
Extra COURTESY 
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when you travel by 

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or 

CHARTER COACHES 

on trips anywhere — 
anytime. 

For charter quotations, call: 
Trailways, at Baltimore, PLaza 2-2116 
Trailways, at Washington, District 7-4200 




NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



25 



For Your 

Enjoyment 
MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 




Rich, smooth, 
Delicious . . . 
A Taste Treat 
for every Occasion. 



Meadow Gold Products Co. 



Ask For Our Flavor Of The Month 



PEABODY CONSERVATORY-COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

announces the remaining 




K^andleiiaht v^oncerls 

featuring 

^Jlte cJLittle LJrcnedtra 



REGINALD STEWART conducting 

Nov. 12 — Joseph V. Laderoute, tenor *Dec. 16 — "Childhood of Christ' 
Joseph Eger, horn Orchestra, Chorus, 

Aldo Parisot, cello Soloists 

7 — Suzanne Danco, Soprano Jan. 21 — Bach Aria Group 

•New date. Changed from Dec. 3 
Tickeis — $2.50 — $2.75 — $3.00 

Peabody Ticket Office — 21 E. Mt. Vernon Place — SA 7-1757 
Bonney Concert Bureau — 327 N. Charles Street — LE 9-3100 



Jan. 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 

26 



ASIA. 



KLOMAN 

Instrument Co. 

Inc. 

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Washington, D. C. 
ENterprise 9-4050 
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the problem plays of the American 
Theatre Wing for presentation to 
parents, educators, and others interested 
in teen-agers, so that they may gain 
insight into the problems of the adoles- 
cent. These plays average approxi- 
mately thirty to fifty minutes in length. 
They are designed to be followed by a 
discussion period. The shock of recog- 
nition is the opening wedge in this novel 
form of parent education. 

As this is the beginning of a new 
service to the State, The Drama Wing 
will offer only one play for the 1957- 
1958 season. This play "Tomorrow is 
a Day," was selected because it por- 
trayed one of the more universal prob- 
lems — insecurity in children. It is a 
play about a mother who gains new 
insight into the reasons behind her 15- 
year-old daughter's inability to believe 
herself capable of coping with new and 
frightening social situations. The play 
is available to groups upon request to 
Mr. Starcher. 

GOES TO GERMANY 

Barbara L. Fiock, '56, recently arrived 
in Germany for assignment as a service 
club director with the Army's Special 
Services staff in Europe. Special Serv- 
ice workers provide entertainment and 
recreation for the Armed Forces per- 
sonnel. A member of Phi Kappa Phi 
and Kappa Delta sororities, she was 
formerly a commercial artist in Waco, 
Texas. 

NEW FACULTY APPOINTMENTS 

The Department of Music has recently 
appointed three new members to the 
faculty. Joel H. Berman, Paul Traver, 
and Mary Viola de Vermond take over 
their duties as Assistant Professor, In- 
structor, and part-time Instructor re- 
spectively. 

Mr. Berman received a B.S. in violin 
from the Juilliard School of Music, an 
MA. in music education. Teachers' Col- 
lege, Columbia University, and is now 
a candidate for the doctor of music 
degree at the University of Michigan. 
He is teaching string instruments, music 
theory, and conducts University Or- 
chestra. 

Mr. Traver directs the Men's and 
Women's Glee Clubs, and teaches music 
theory and class piano. He received a 
B.Mus. in piano from Catholic Univer- 
sity of America where he was Phi Beta 
Kappa. He also was awarded his 
M.Mus. in piano and education by 
Catholic University and is presently a 
candidate for a Ph.D. degree at the 
same institution. 

Miss de Vermond holds a B.Mus. in 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



organ from Howard University, an 
M.A. in music education from leaclicis 
College, Columbia University, and 
studied four years at the Juilliard 
School of Music. She teaches piano. 

TO JAPAN 

Jerome S. DoubrofT, '56, an ensign in 
the U. S. Navy, left San Diego August 
13 bound for Japan. Ens. Doubrofl 
will not return to this country until 
April, 1958. 

EXHIBITS WORK 

There was an exhibition of the work 
of Herman Maril, well-known Amer- 
ican painter and Associate Professor in 
the Department of Art, in the audi- 
torium of the Student Union Building 
from November 3rd to November 22nd. 
The exhibit opened with a reception to 
Mr. Maril on November 3rd at 2 p.m. 

Although this show was not a retro- 
spective exhibit, most of the paintings 
were selected from examples of the 
past twenty years up to the present day. 
Many of the works were on loan from 
leading museums and private collections. 

Mr. Maril's work has been shown in 
museums and universities throughout 
the country, among which are: The 
Museum of Modern Art, Whitney 
Museum, Brooklyn Museum, Metro- 
politan Museum of Art, Baltimore Mu- 
seum, the Carnegie Institute, and others. 
His works are in the permanent collec- 
tions of: The Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, the Baltimore Museum, Phillip's 
Gallery, Corcoran Gallery, Amherst 
College, American University, Delaware 
Fine Arts Center, Bezalel Museum 
(Israel) and others both here and 
abroad. 

One-man shows of his work have 
been held in Baltimore, Provincetown, 
New York, Philadelphia, Washington, 
D. C, Scranton, and Knoxville. He has 
been the recipient of many awards and 
honors for his work. This exhibit en- 
abled the public to gain a greater under- 
standing of his work by seeing examples 
from his early days to the present. 

ELECTED 

Dr. John Lembach, Associate Professor, 
has been elected Secretary-Treasurer of 
the National Art Education Association 
for 1957-1959. 

TEACHES WORKSHOP 

Mr. Wallace Amundson, an Art De- 
partment graduate, will teach an Art 
Education Workshop at Annapolis this 
fall. 

(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

ROLLY ROLLS, his entertaining 
piano and his orchestra for 
dancing, 10 till closing. 
COLONIAL WAGONS DINNER 
$3.85, 6 to 10, Monday thru 
Saturday. 

Blue Room 

Brings you its Parade of fam- 
ous name Bands for dancing 
from 8:15 to 12:45. Tuesday 
thru Saturday. 

Dining from 7. 



THE 




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WASHINGTON, D. C. 




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INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



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Alexandria, Va. 

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WASHINGTON'S 
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LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

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aLum.nl of tns 
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27 




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>T< Very Impressive Potion 

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iron the 

CroSSe &Elackwell 
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At your grocer's now, or write for 
name of nearest dealer to: Crosse 
& Blackwell, Baltimore 24, Md. 



Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Established 1872 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Hove Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

■ — Delivery Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



Since 1884 

Midstate Federal 

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Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tontoliiing barbecue dishes In the grand 
manner! Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefsl 

Nate's and Leon's 

iml ico 

HOTEL 

Open 'til 2 a.m. - Saturday 'til S 
5301 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. BALTIMORE 



W. H. 


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fine 
foods 


| HOTELS 

J PLaza 2-1910 


to 


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28 



FIRST SOLO FLIGHT 

A first solo flight was made August 21 
by Navy Ensign Earle V. Hart, Jr., '57. 
In addition to solo flights, he is being 
instructed in communications, naviga- 
tion, engineering, athletics, aerology and 
civil air regulations during basic flight 
training at Pensacola, Florida. 

GRADUATES AS FIELD TRADE OFFICER 

Army Capt. Roy E. Tucker, '51, re- 
cently was graduated from the 31 -week 
officer advanced course at The Infantry 
School, Fort Benning, Ga. Captain 
Tucker was instructed in the duties and 
responsibilities of a field trade officer. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Egbert F. Tingley 

JOINS KAISER ALUMINUM 

Leo M. Cavanaugh, '56, has been as- 
signed to the training program at the 
Halethorpe, Maryland Extrusion Works 
of the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical 
Corporation. He has a B.S. in indus- 
trial management and will be following 
the rotating training course in the in- 
dustrial engineering department. Cava- 
naugh was extremely active in college, 
having been president of the Newman 
Club, Junior class representative to the 
Men's League, and named to the Amer- 
ican Institute of Industrial Engineers. 
He is a veteran of five years service in 
the U. S. Navy, where he was a com- 
munications technician. 

ENDS TOUR OF DUTY 

Army Pvt. Philip N. Steel, Jr., recently 
completed the second phase of a six- 
month tour of duty under the Reserve 
Forces Act program at Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, Indiana. Steel terminated a 
period of enlisted finance training after 
having completed basic combat training 
at Fort Knox, Kentucky. 

TO EDIT ECONOMIC JOURNAL 

Dr. John P. Henderson, who holds the 
doctor of philosophy degree of the Uni- 
versity and is now Assistant Professor 
of Economics at the University of Pitts- 
burgh, has been granted leave for the 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



academic year 1957-58 to assume edi- 
torial responsibilities at the University 
of Illinois in Urbana. As a visiting As- 
sociate Professor in the Illinois Bureau 
of Economic and Business Research, 
Dr. Henderson will serve as Executive 
Editor of the quarterly publication, 
Current Economic Comment. 

DR. COVER MODERATES PANEL 

Dr. John H. Cover, Director of the 
Bureau of Business and Economic Re- 
search, moderated a panel discussion 
during the fall meeting of the Interstate 
Commission on the Potomac River 
Basin. The subject of the discussion 
was "Recreational Planning and Eco- 
nomic Values." Held September 13 and 
14 at Cacapon State Park. Lodge, 
Berkely Springs, West Virginia, the 
Interstate Commission meeting had as 
its theme, "The Public Speaks on 
Recreation." 

MISS WATERS IN NEW YORK 

Miss Kate Waters, '57, has accepted a 
position as secretary in the Marketing 
Research Department of Freeport Sul- 
phur Company. She spent the summer 
touring seven countries in Europe 
before beginning work. 

BUNDY FLIES SOLO 

A first solo flight was made August 19 
by Naval Aviation Cadet Charles P. 
Bundy, Jr., '57, of Baltimore. In addi- 
tion to solo flights, he is being instructed 
in communications, navigation, engi- 
neering, athletics, aerology and civil 
air regulations during basic flight train- 
ing at Pensacola, Florida. 

ASSIGNMENT IN FRANCE 

First Lieutenant Robert I. Zamsky, '55, 
was recently reassigned to the 60th 
troop carrier wing in Druex, France. 
After his graduation from the Univer- 
sity, Lt. Zamsky attended primary pilot 
training at Kinston, North Carolina and 
then jet basic training at Greenville Air 
Force Base, Mississippi. He is currently 
flying C-119's and his tour of duty 
overseas will be three years. 

NOMA CONFERENCE HERE 

The ninth annual conference of the 
National Office Management Associa- 
tion was held at the University, October 
24-26. Technical sessions were sched- 
uled on creative thinking, brain-storm- 
ing techniques, personnel selection and 
training, dealing with people effectively, 
and how to get effective results through 
good office leadership and management. 
The program offered specialized 
training through the cooperation of 
Area III of the National Office Manage- 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



FLOORS 

by 

HAMMOND 

In the beautiful 

TROPHY ROOM 

in the 

ACTIVITIES BUILDING 

at the 

University of Maryland 



40,000 Square Feet of Asphalt 
Tile Flooring in grey and black 
enhance the beauty of this out- 
standing building. 



IIITOII 

BROTHERS 
INC. 



4315 YORK ROAD 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

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1799 



1957 



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DAVID W. JENKINS, President 



4905 York Road at Rossiter Ave. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

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29 




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SALES 
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30 



ment Association for executives and 
supervisors engaged in activities in- 
volving management responsibilities in 
business and government. Training was 
under the supervision of nationally 
prominent authorities in each field. 

Highlighting the first session of the 
conference was a technical presentation 
on creative thinking by Dr. Leopold 
Pessel of the Radio Corporation of 
America of Camden, New Jersey. In 
line with the conference theme of in- 
creasing our management know-how, 
Dr. Pessel, a nationally known author- 
ity in the field, spoke on "An Evalua- 
tion of the Creative Mind." 

Mr. Carl E. Auvil, a top flight train- 
ing specialist of the Navy Department, 
was the speaker at the afternoon session. 
In keeping with the theme of the con- 
ference, the topic of the technical pres- 
entation was "Swat Cost with Brain- 
storming." Small round tables were held 
so that all conferees had an opportunity 
to participate in the brainstorming 
demonstrations. 

Sponsored by the Department of Of- 
fice Techniques and Management in 
cooperation with the area three chapters 
of NOMA, the conference was attended 
by more than 100 office executives and 
managers, industrial engineers, methods 
and procedure analysts, and others who 
control organizational activities. Any 
manager having an interest in conduc- 
ing his office activities more effectively 
was eligible to attend. 

BECOMES MAGICIAN IN THREE MONTHS 

Richard L. Toth, '57, is now a wander- 
ing electronic's magician. He is one of 
six young men in the public and em- 
ployee relations services of General 
Electric Company now demonstrating 
the "House of Magic" to high schools 
throughout the country. The purpose 
of this show is to interest students in 
careers of science and engineering. 
Dick is currently touring the southern 
states. 



College of 

SPECIAL AND 

CONTINUATION 

STUDIES 



ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES MADE 

Several administrative changes were 
effected both at College Park and in 
the Overseas Divisions with the begin- 
ning of the 1957-58 Academic Year. 
In the Heidelberg Office. Mr. Ernest 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Hofer was elevated from Assistant Di- 
rector to Associate Director of the 
European Division. Dr. Robert C. Lar- 
son, formerly associated with the 
Information Division, Headquarters, 
U.S. Army Europe, replaced Mr. Hofer 
as Assistant Director in charge of Pub- 
licity and Public Relations. Dr. Paul 
Dickson, retired U.S. Army Colonel 
and former Professor in the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages at West 
Point, has assumed new duties as Resi- 
dent Dean of the University of Mary- 
land Munich Branch. 

At the College Park Office, Mr. G. 
Allen Sager replaced Mr. Edward F. 
James as Assistant to the Dean and 
Executive Editor of The Marylander. 
Mr. Sager was formerly Assistant Di- 
rector of Education Services, Head- 
quarters Pacific Air Forces. Mr. James 
went to Bermuda as a Lecturer in the 
University of Maryland Program. Mr. 
John Valois has been appointed deputy 
to Mr. Richard H. Stottler, Director 
of Institutes. 

Dr. Richard W. Seltzer assumed duty 
as Assistant Director of the Baltimore 
Division. Dr. Seltzer was formerly the 
Director of Field Service for the Mary- 
land State Teachers Association, Balti- 
more and took both his B.A. and doc- 
torate with the University of Maryland. 

In the Tokyo Office, Dr. Mason G. 
Daly succeeded Dr. Augustus J. Prahl 
as Director of the Far East Division. 
Dr. Daly was transferred from the 
Associate Directorship of the European 
Division when Dr. Prahl returned to 
the College Park campus to become As- 
sociate Dean of the Graduate School. 

Also shifted from his former position 
as Lecturer in the European Division 
was Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard who was 
appointed Assistant Director of the Far 
East Division. 

THREE RECEIVE DIPLOMAS 

Diplomas were recently awarded to Lt. 
Col. Ernest O. Ewan and Capt. Aaron 
D. Maier at ceremonies held at Pepper- 
rell Air Base, Newfoundland. The di- 
plomas were awarded by Dr. Stanley 
J. Drazek, Associate Dean of CSCS. 
Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Dean of the 
Faculty, delivered the commencement 
address. Similar ceremonies took place 
in Tokyo with the awarding of a di- 
ploma to Maj. Eldeen H. Kauffman. 
Maj. KaufTman began his study in Ger- 
many in 1949 and subsequent work led 
to the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Military Science. The degree was con- 
ferred by Dr. Augustus J. Prahl who 
was then Director of the Far East 
Division. 

(Continued on next page) 



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NEWS OF THE GRADUATES 

Major Frank E. Loftus, Heidelberg 
'57, wasted no time initiating a gradu- 
ate program. He has enrolled at the 
University of Pittsburgh as a participant 
in the graduate program sponsored by 
the United States Armed Forces Insti- 
tute of Technology. 

Major Harold R. Mackey, College 
Park '57, was the first graduate of the 
new Marine Corps College Degree Pro- 
gram which permits selected officers to 
complete a maximum of two semesters 
on a university campus in order to 
achieve the Baccalaureate Degree. 

Colonel Wesley C. Wilson was 
awarded a Master's Degree at College 
Park in June of 1957, retired from the 
Army the following month and has now 
become a college instructor of Ameri- 
can History at Bismarck Junior Col- 
lege, Bismarck, North Dakota. Colonel 
Wilson completed his Master's require- 
ments on off-duty time while he was 
stationed at Fort Meade. 

Colonel George B. Simler, College 
Park '48, is the new Director of Ath- 
letics at the Air Force Academy, Den- 
ver, Colorado. He was enrolled in the 
University of Maryland from 1946 to 
1948 and captained the 1947 University 
of Maryland football team which 
played the University of Georgia to a 
20-20 tie in the Gator Bowl on New 
Year's Day, 1948. 

Mr. David K. King, Heidelberg '57, 
was the first dependent of a member of 
the Armed Forces to earn a degree in 
the University of Maryland's Overseas 
Program. Mr. King hopes to make a 
career for himself in the United States 
Foreign Service. 

DR. MICHELS VISITS EUROPEAN PROGRAM 

Dr. A. Michels, internationally famed 
physicist from the University of 
Amsterdam, visited Maryland's Euro- 
pean Program last August. Dr. Michels 
is making a thorough study of the 
United States Armed Forces Educa- 
tion Program in Europe to determine 
the feasibility of initiating a similar 
program for Dutch MTO Forces. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Gardner P. H. Foley 
Kryle W. Preis 



32 



APPOINTED TO STATE DENTAL BOARD 

Dr. Ralph R. Racicot, '36, was recently 
appointed to a five-year term as a mem- 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ber of the Massachusetts Board of 
Dental Examiners by Governor Foster 
Furcolo. While at the Dental School, 
he was a member of the Gorgas Cklon- 
tological Honor Society. He has been 
a practicing dentist in Southbridge for 
2 1 years. 

LEVIN IN NEW LONDON 

Jules J. Levin, '56, was recently assigned 
by the United States Public Health Serv- 
', ice to the United States Coast Guard 
Academy in New London. Connecticut, 
where he and his wife and small son are 
now living. 

DR. L. C. GALLEN HONORED 

At a commemorative dinner held at the 
Baltimore Country Club on June 24, 
Dr. Lester C. Gallen, '28, of Baltimore, 
was presented a scroll testifying to his 
fine leadership and important personal 
efforts in securing the passage of the 
Maryland Senate Bill 61. The dinner 
was attended and the scroll presented 
by the men who had worked with Dr. 
Gallen in support of the legislative 
measure, which was passed unani- 
mously by both the House of Delegates 
and the Senate. Bill 61 is a permissory 
law allowing professional persons and 
civil employees to set up trusts for the 
purpose of obtaining low-cost group 
life insurance. The School of Dentistry 
alumni present at the dinner were Drs. 
R. Kent Tongue, Jr., '43; George M. 
Anderson, '19; Charles E. Broadrup, 
'32; Arthur I. Bell, '19; Lynn Emmart, 
'22; Conrad L. Inman, Sr., '15; and 
Ernest B. Nuttall, '31. Other alumni 
present were Hubert H. Hubbard, '50 
(Law); Dr. Karl F. Mech, '35 (Medi- 
cine); Charles D. Harris, '33 (Law); 
and Paul F. Due, '23 (Law). Also 
present were Raymond K. Tongue, D. 
Worthington Pearre, Ben King, Herbert 
H. Grymes, Elmer F. Bernhardt, Wilbur 
D. Preston, Jr., Dr. Howard Smith, Ed- 
ward K. Gerner, William Heinekamp, 
Dr. Robert C. Kimberly, George L. 
McDowell, State Comptroller Millard 
F. Tawes, and Senator Thomas F. 
Dempsey. 

Originally from New Brunswick, New 
Jersey, Dr. Gallen has practiced in 
Baltimore since his graduation. He is 
a member of the Gorgas Odontological 
Society and Omicron Kappa Upsilon. 

1957 GRADUATES 

First Lieutenants Hubert T. Chandler, 
Fred H. A. Koeniger, Joe H. Miller, Jr., 
and Richard E. Cabana have recently 
graduated from the military medical 
orientation course at the Army Medical 
Service School, Fort Sam Houston, 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



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33 




Baltimore 18, Md. 
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FOR THE THINGS 
of the SPIRIT . . . 

The University's Chapel has a 
dignity and quiet charm that 
sets it apart from worldly things. 

This beautiful building is just one 
of the many on the Maryland Campus 
containing steel fabricated by 
Dietrich Brothers. 



DIETRICH 
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Texas. The course is designed for newly 
commissioned officers, and stresses 
medical service in combat with empha- 
sis on dental field training. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

Dr. Robert J. Wilson, '56, is stationed 
at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas. 

Dr. Edward Quat, '44, has practiced 
in Brooklyn. N. Y.. since his separation 
from the Navy in 1946. He resides in 
Westport, Conn. Dr. Quat is Staff Den- 
tist for the American Liability Insur- 
ance Co. and the International Terminal 
Operators, Inc. and has been affiliated 
with the Periodontia Department of 
Sydenham Hospital since 1951. 

Dr. Paul M. Mitchell, '50. is practic- 
ing in Trenton, N. J. Dr. Mitchell 
served in the Army from 1942-1946 
and was separated with the rank of Cap- 
tain. His service in the Navy Dental 
Corps following graduation included an 
assignment as Regimental Dental Sur- 
geon with the First Regiment of the 
First Marine Division in Korea, 1951- 
1952. 

Dr. William L. Nufer, '51, has prac- 
ticed in Danville, Va., since 1953, fol- 
lowing a two years' assignment at Fort 
Meade. In World War II Dr. Nufer 
served for three years in the Navy. Dr. 
Nufer is President of the Danville 
Dental Society. 

Dr. Gustave A. Oduber, '53, has 
practiced in Oranjestad, Aruba, N.W.I. 
since his graduation. Dr. Oduber is a 
founding member of the Aruba Dental 
Society (1954) and has been its only 
Secretary. He is Government Advisor 
for the fluoridation of the water system 
of Aruba and will conduct the research 
to determine its effects in the children 
from six to twelve. He is also active 
in promoting amateur sports in Aruba, 
being Vice-President of the Aruba Sport 
Union. 

Dr. Wylie I. Smith, '12. of Clifton, 
N. J., practiced in that city from his 
graduation until his retirement in 1949. 
Dr. Smith is a Past President of the 
Passaic County Dental Society and of 
the Clifton Kiwanis Club. A devotee 
of trout fishing, he has followed his 
hobby in several Canadian locations and 
in many places up and down the At- 
lantic Coast. 

Dr. Santiago Padilla. Jr., '51. prac- 
ticed for five years in Mayaguez, P. R. 
before removing to Santurce in Decem- 
ber. In 1955-56 he was President of the 
Mayaguez District Dental Society. Dr. 
Padilla is a Captain in the U. S. A. 
Dental Corps Reserve. He served in 
the Army Infantry from 1940 to 1946 
and was separated as a First Lieutenant. 
Dr. Normand O. Paquin, '46, is Presi- 



34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



dent of the Fall River (Mass.) Dental 
Society. A member of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce since 1950, he 
was its President in 1954 and 1955. He 
is a charter member of the Greater Fall 
River Development Corporation. Since 
1950 he has been the Director of the 
Allegro Glee Club, a group of 40 voices. 
Dr. Paquin served in the Army D. C. 
following his graduation and was sepa- 
rated in August, 1947 as a Captain. 

Dr. Jose R. Pricto-Hcrnandez, '56, is 
assigned to the USAF Hospital at the 
Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico. 

Dr. Seymour A. Robins (Rabinowitz) 
'39, has been specializing in Orthodon- 
tics since 1949, with offices in New 
Britain and Hartford, Conn. He re- 
ceived his M.S. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Michigan in 1941. From 
1942 to 1946 Dr. Robins served in the 
Army DC, being separated with the 
rank of Major. 

Dr. Jarrett M. Ward, '20, has been 
practicing in Crisfield, Md. since 1948. 
He had formerly practiced in Aber- 
deen and Baltimore. Dr. Ward is a 
Past President of the Eastern Shore 
Dental Society (1955-56). He has been 
President of the Crisfield Chamber of 
Commerce since 1950. For two years 
following his graduation he was Assist- 
ant Demonstrator of Operative Dentis- 
try at the B.C.D.S. 

Dr. Edward M. Werfel, '54, is prac- 
ticing in Springfield, N. J., following 
two years of service in the USAF at 
Boiling Field. 

Dr. Alpha A. Williams, '97, of Co- 
lumbus, Ga., retired in September, 1955 
after fifty-eight years of practice. An 
outstanding figure in Georgia dentistry, 
Dr. Williams was President of the 
Columbus Dental Society in 1914 and 
of the Georgia State Dental Society in 
1916-17. In 1924 he was appointed to 
the State Board of Dental Examiners. 
At eighty-one Dr. Williams still hunts 
quail and goes fishing. 

Dr. H. Milton Cooper, '36, of Hack- 
ensack, N. J., has been specializing in 
Orthodontics since 1947. He is a Past 
President of three dental organizations: 
Passaic-Bergen Alumni Chapter of 
Alpha Omega, Bergen County Dental 
Society and Orthodontic Alumni So- 
ciety of Columbia; he now holds the 
office of Vice-President of the New 
Jersey Society of Dentistry for Children. 
Dr. Cooper will be a member of the 
Orthodontics Staff at Fairleigh- Dickin- 
son when that school begins instruction 
to upper classmen. 

Dr. Donald F. Marshall, '55, began 
practice in Smyrna, Ga., in August, 
1955. 

(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



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Insurance & Bonding of every 
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Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3, MD. 

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35 



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36 



Dr. Eugene E. Veasey, '26, of Wil- 
mington, Del., began in 1952 to special- 
ize in Periodontia and Oral Medicine. 
He is a member of the American Acad- 
emy of Periodontology, Academy of 
Stomatology, American Academy of 
Dental Medicine, and the Philadelphia 
Periodontal Society. 

Dr. Robert F. Lamb. '47, of Asbury 
Park, N. J., is President-Elect of the 
Monmouth County Dental Society. He 
served in the USAF from 1951 to Jan- 
uary, 1956. 

Dr. Louis R. Schilling, '27. of Hack- 
ensack, N. J., was promoted to the rank 
of Captain in U.S.N. R. on July 1, 1956. 
Dr. Schilling had practiced in Oradell, 
N. J., 1927-1942, but removed to Hack- 
ensack in 1945 following three years of 
active service in the Navy, chiefly in 
Trinidad, B.W.I. He was President of 
the Bergen County Dental Society, 
1943-44, and Treasurer, 1948-52. 

Dr. Morris E. Brown, '33, of Fair- 
mont, W. Va., has contributed several 
papers to the West Virginia State Den- 
tal Journal and has presented many 
clinics before the West Virginia com- 
ponent societies. Dr. Brown has taken 
postgraduate courses at Michigan, 
Northwestern and Ohio State. He 
served in the Navy, 1943-46, and pres- 
ently holds the rank of Commander in 
the U.S.N. R. Dr. Brown is Past Presi- 
dent of the Monongahela Valley Dental 
Society, Community Council of Social 
Agencies, Lions Club, and West Vir- 
ginia Society of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. He has also served as 
Secretary of the Marion County His- 
torical Society and Historian of Amer- 
ican Legion Post 17. He has been 
specializing in Oral Surgery since 1946. 
Dr. Waverley C. Artz, '56, is practic- 
ing at 405 First National Bank Building, 
Vicksburg, Miss. 

Dr. Harold R. Beecher, '55, of Ham- 
den, Conn., is Associate Editor of the 
Journal of the Connecticut State Dental 
Association. 

Dr. Herbert M. Weinstein, '36, of 
Orange, N. J., is Chairman of the New 
Jersey Executive Council of the United 
World Federalists. 

Dr. Robert R. Callahan, '56, is prac- 
ticing in Melbourne, Fla. Dr. Callahan 
served in the A.A.F., 1945-46. 

Dr. Melvin C. Beaumont, '43, 
(November) has re-entered the armed 
services. Major Beaumont is stationed 
in Germany. He had previously prac- 
ticed for nine years in Arlington, Va. 
Dr. Frederick Aurbach, '41, has prac- 
ticed in Wichita, Kans., since 1948. Dr. 
Aurbach was separated from the Army 
in 1945 with the rank of Major. 

Dr. Robert A. George, '45, of Mt. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Airy, N. C, is President of Kiwanis. 
He is a Past President of the Blue Ridge 
Dental Society (1955) and the North 
Carolina Unit of the American Society 
of Dentistry for Children ( 1955). Dr. 
George served in the Navy, 1945-48. 

Dr. Domenic C. Cimini. '51, removed 
last year to Warwick, R. I., after five 
years' practice in Pawtucket. Dr. 
Cimini served in the Navy, 1943-46, 
attaining the rank of Ensign. 

Dr. Jack T. Gibson, '53, is practicing 
at 246 Burke Ave., Towson, Md. Dr. 
Gibson received his discharge from the 
Army, with the rank of Captain, in 
October. 

Dr. Hunter A. Brinker, '55, is sta- 
tioned at Fort Myer, Va. 

Dr. James R. Childress, '53, has prac- 
ticed in Anderson, S. C, since his dis- 
charge from the Navy in 1955. Dr. 
Childress is Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Anderson County Dental Society. 

Dr. Carlotta A. Hawley (Mrs. Horace 
E. Johnston) '36, of Washington, D. C, 
specialized in Pedodontics and Ortho- 
dontics 1940-45, but has confined her 
practice to Orthodontics since 1945. 
She interned at the Forsyth Dental In- 
firmary for Children and then took a 
postgraduate course in Orthodontics at 
Harvard. Dr. Hawley is a Diplomate 
of the American Board of Orthodontics 
and a Past President of the Washing- 
ton-Baltimore Society of Orthodontists 
(1955). 

Dr. John V. Conte, '54, who entered 
the Army in July, 1956, is stationed at 
Fort Myer, Va. Following his gradua- 
tion Dr. Conte served an internship and 
a residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

Dr. Don-Neil Brotman, '55, is as- 
signed to the Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center. 

Dr. Morton A. Brownstein, '56, is in 
the Navy, stationed at Quantico, Va. 

Dr. Francis J. Ellison, '12, of 5301 
St. Albans Way, Baltimore 12, Md., re- 
tired in 1952 after forty years of prac- 
tice in Baltimore. Dr. Ellison presented 
several clinics before local and state 
societies. Since his retirement he has 
traveled widely in this country and in 
Europe and South America. 

Dr. Edward J. Becker, '56, is sta- 
tioned at the U.S.N.S. Treasure Island. 
California. 

Dr. Emilio B. Catasus, '26, of Santi- 
ago de Cuba, Cuba, was President of 
the Collegio Estomatologico de Santi- 
ago de Cuba for three terms. He is 
also a Past President of Rotary. Dr. 
Catasus has taught English at the local 
high school since 1934. 

Dr. Leonard B. Isbister, '53, has prac- 
ticed in the Lutz Building, Bel Air, Md. 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



J.H.DeVEAU &SON.Inc 



General Contractors 



ROADS 

DRIVEWAYS 

PIPE 



EXCAVATION 

BUILDINGS 

CONCRETE 



CONCRETE SAWS 



4100 Jones Bridge Road 

North Chevy Chase, Md 



McLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co.. Inc. 



CUT STONE 



Bladensburg, Maryland 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 

Store 

Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY BLVD. and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 
LANGLEY PARK, MD. 

HEmlock 4-3000 



SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO. 



8670 Colesville Rd. 

SILVER SPRING. MD. 

JU 9-8844 



See the NEW Better Than Ever 



SALES 



&&*& 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

3110 Hamilton Street 

HYATTSVIUE, MD. 
Phone WArneld 7-0900 



■ HEATING WArneld 7-8S38 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 


ROBERT 


F. HOFF 




| 4313 - 46th Ave. 


Riverdole, 


Md. 



37 



Stromberg - Carlson 

DIRECT FACTORY DISTRIBUTOR 

• MUSIC & PAGING SYSTEMS • SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

• HIGH FIDELITY COMPONENTS • INTERCOM SYSTEMS 

• DIAL-X AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE SYSTEMS 

Custom Engineered by 

HENRY O. BERAAAN CO., INC. 

—ESTABLISHED 1925 — 

10-12 E. LOMBARD ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. LE 9-700?! 

" *1Ue*e'i. filaUtUuj, Qit&i. Ikon a SbuMnhstof-CaAhott " 



51st ANNIVERSARY 



1906 




1957 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. CUrtis 7-1112 



FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 

PHYSICIANS DENTISTS NURSES 
MAIDS WAITRESSES BEAUTICIANS 



— Stores Located 



235 PARK AVENUE 

BALTO. 1. MD. 

MU 5-7222 

712 E. GRACE STREET 

RICHMOND 19, VA. 

Rl 7-2685 



900 11th ST. N.W. 

WASH. 1, D.C. 

EX 3-8200 

515 BOUSH STREET 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 

MA 7-3639 



MOTORS and GENERATORS 
Sold — Repaired — Rewound — Installed 

COMPLETE SHOP FACILITIES 

Trouble Service in 15 Minutes . 

C. H. STARK ELECTRIC CO. 

119 Light St. Baltimore, Md. PL 2-5600 



mm 

»%. Est 1868 ^ d 



AT OUR BAKE SHOPS 

Delivered Fresh Twice Daily 

• Layer Cakes 

• Party Cookies 

• Wedding Cakes 

• Low Sodium Bread 

• Eastern Sho' Bread 

• Coffee Cakes 

• PAN DANDY 

Brown 'n Serve Rolls 

See your telephone book 
for locations 

dice' f l fiakeiy 

Baltimore, Maryland 



T 



0WS0N 

ELEPH0NE 

SECRETARIES 

Mrs. Flanagan, Owner 

WE ANSWER YOUR PHONE 
VAIley 5-1300 

24 Hours A Day Every Day 

TOWSON 

Month to Month Basis, Order By Phone 

For Information Call VAIley 5-1300 

107 YORK ROAD 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



since his discharge from the Navy in 
1955. During the World War, Dr. 
Isbister served in the Merchant Marine. 

Dr. Edwin C. Barnes, '31. of Wood- 
bury, N. J., is President of the Southern 
New Jersey Dental Society and Chair- 
man of the Essay Committee of the 
New Jersey Dental Society. 

Dr. Asher B. Carey, '43 (March), of 
Selbyville, Del., entered the Army 
shortly after graduation and was sepa- 
rated June, 1946 as a Major. He has 
since then developed an interesting 
combination of professional and non- 
professional interests. He is a Past 
President of the Lions Club and served 
two terms on the Town Council. He is 
a Director of the Millsboro Home Fed- 
eral Savings and Loan Association and 
a member of the Board of Trustees of 
Delaware State College. 

Dr. Arthur I. Ferrante. '52, has prac- 
ticed in Newark, N. J. since 1952; he 
has also practiced in Florham Park, 
N. J. since 1956. Dr. Ferrante served 
in the Dental Corps, USAF in the 
World War. 

Dr. Ashur G. Chavoor, '48, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, has specialized in Ortho- 
dontia since 1953. Following three 
years in the Army and the Air Force, 
Dr. Chavoor attended Columbia for 
two years. 

There are hundreds of alumni who 
remember Dr. Luther W. Fetter. '31, as 
an Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
from 1931 to 1938. Dr. Fetter gave up 
teaching and his Baltimore practice to 
open an office in Elizabethtown, Pa. He 
is a Past President of the Rotary Club 
(1946) and of the Chamber of Com- 
merce (1946). "Dutch" still finds time, 
as usual, for hunting and fishing. 

Dr. Nicholas J. Capone, '41. of Balti- 
more, is Chief of Surgery, RTC Clinic, 
Fort Bragg, N. C. Major Capone en- 
tered the service in 1955. 

Dr. Michael E. Fleming, '56. is as- 
signed to the Anacostia NAS, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Dr. Joseph Berkeley, '43 (November) 
has practiced in Brooklyn, N. Y. since 
his discharge from the Army in 1946, 
with the rank of Major. Dr. Berkeley 
married the former Esther Hendler. 
who graduated from Maryland (College 
Park) in 1942. The Berkeleys have 
three children: Alan (9), Janet (6), 
and Linda (5) . 

Dr. John M. Fracasso, '54. began 
practice in Glastonbury, Conn., shortly 
after his graduation. During the World 
War, Dr. Fracasso served in the Navy. 

Dr. Eugene M. Ganc. '39. has re- 
turned to the practice of dentistry after 
a three-year truancy period. Dr. Gane 
served an internship at the U.S. Marine 



38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Hospital in Boston. He practiced in 
Hartford, Conn, for two years. After 
service in the Army, 1942-44, he prac- 
ticed in West Hartford, 1945-53. Dur- 
ing the next three years he devoted 
himself completely to interests such as 
idea man for business and industry, 
professional feature writing, writing 
advertising copy, vocational guidance, 
etc. In July, 1956 Dr. Gane resumed 
the practice of dentistry in New Britain 
,' and has become convinced that dentis- 
try is his true calling. 

Dr. Nelson D. Bookstaver, '47, of 

Bergenfield, N. J., began specializing in 

Orthodontia in February. Dr. Book- 

. staver received his postgraduate train- 

| ing at Columbia. 

Dr. John S. Frost, '08, of Burlington, 
N. C, retired in 1948. In his retire- 
ment Dr. Frost has developed an inter- 
, est in the real estate business. He has 
motored in forty-two states and in 
many areas of Canada. 

Dr. C. Richard Gaines, '54, began 
practicing at 1 336 Glenwood Ave., 
Atlanta, Ga., after his discharge from 
the Army. 

Dr. Frederick T. Brennan, '56, is as- 
signed to the U.S.A.F. Hospital in 
Chaumont, France. 

Dr. William T. Fridinger. '48, is Pres- 
ident of the Allegany-Garrett County 
Dental Society. Dr. Fridinger has prac- 
ticed in Cumberland, Md., since 1948. 
He is a member of three Boards of 
Directors: Y.M.C.A., Chamber of Com- 
merce, and Community Chest; and is 
a Past Worshipful Master of Potomac 
Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 

Dr. James C. Gantt, '52, transplanted 
Tarheel, is practicing at 1102 North 
Jackson St., Wilmington, Del. Dr. Gantt 
is Secretary of the Delaware State Den- 
tal Society. 

Dr. Harold F. Bradshaw, '18, of New 
London, Conn., retired in 1950 because 
of poor health. 

Dr. Samuel Friedman, '36, of Balti- 
more, is the Grand Chaplain of the 
national chapter of Sigma Epsilon 
Delta. He was President of the Eutaw 
Place Temple Brotherhood, 1949-52. 
Dr. Friedman gave a table clinic at the 
1956 A.D.A. meeting and has given 
clinics at meetings of the Maryland and 
Tennessee Associations. He served in 
the Army, 1953-55, with the rank of 
Major. 

Dr. Walter L. Garrett, '10, of Glens 
Falls, N. Y., is amazingly active for a 
man of seventy-five. Besides continu- 
ing his professional activities, he main- 
tains a keen interest in the cultural as- 
pects of community life. He is Vice- 
President and Director of the Glens 

(Continued on page 43) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 




ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



0.(//i/<i.ti' i nJionttt C Kvelopi . Vlanufuctuttt 

Established 1912 

Factory and Office: 2f>10 LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W . 
Washington 9, D.C, ADams l-i*i7<i 



^JUe Metropolitan, ^o+vtilt Gamfiatuf, 

I Hi: THK HKST IN TKAVKI. K V KK Y U 1 1 1 I: I VI NO KXTRA COST 



STEAMSHIPS 
CRUISES 



AIRLINES 
TOURS 



RESORTS 
HOTELS 



1115 N. CHARLES ST. 



BALTIMORE 1. MD. 



LE 9-7300 



I'rrxonatizcd Travrl N, 



Sim 



frgfryS^Qs^Qga^SH 



STURDEE 

All Metal Porch 
and Step Units 

COMMERCIAL AND 

RESIDENTIAL 

STAIRWAYS 

"The Best Lifetime All Steel 
Porch and Step Unit Made!" 

STURDEE 

Metal Products Co. 

1743 lamont avenue 
baltimore 2, md. 

SA 7-0294 and 7-8666 



^Q^c^x^J^^^r^\S, 



Hendlers 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



little Furs" 

THE 

PERFECT 

GIFT 

tJfavelo-cJz 
& 

Sele+iho-iv 
221 N. LIBERTY ST. 




BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-0275 



FOR DISCRIMINATING MEN 

FORMAL WEAR RENTAL SERVICE 

NEWEST STYLES — PROPERLY FITTED 

3805 Forest Park Avenue 

(Just off Garrison Blvd.) 
MOhawk 4-8070 

Baltimore, Md. 



MU 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 
1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



39 



STEIN'S 

401 NORTH CHARLES 

at Mulberry 

Headquarters in Baltimore 
FOR FAMOUS 

Norris Reproductions 



in 

CHERRY 

WALNUT 

MAHOGANY 



Serving Chest in 

Solid Mahogany $168.00 



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MiU&i fcnatkeU 

Young MODERN'S Shop 

Outstanding Sport and 

Casual Clothes 

LE 9-0550 1110-1112 

Baltimore, Md. N.CharlesSt. 




Earle Kirkley, Inc. 

3413 Greenmount Ave. 
BALTIMORE. MD. 




#04 



By Sally Ladin Ogden 

Somehow at Christmas time I like to 
reminisce about Christmases in the 
rural areas, the little villages to the far 
north nestled away, where the nostalgic 
flavor of our childhood still exists. Here 
the snow lies blanketed against barns 
and houses and the path to the wood 
pile stands out prominently against the 
pure white of the snow that crunches as 
you walk over it. On Christmas Eve, 
in the quiet of the little town, the stars 
are so bright you feel that you can 
reach out and touch them. The air is 
clear and cold and one feels the spirit 
of well being. 

The children are tucked away but 
it's a sleepless night, as the adult activi- 
ties of trimming the Christmas tree, be- 
gin. The tall pine tree, which just that 
morning had been selected as the finest 
in the forest, is properly placed in the 
center of the living room windows. 
Balls of pop corn, chains of cranberries, 
and loops of colored papers (formed 
into a garland rope) along with tinsel 
and candles are carefully hung upon 
it. The gayly trimmed home-made 
gifts, made with tender, loving hands 
for young and old, are piled under the 
tree. Every stocking which has been 
hung by the fireplace is filled to the 
overflowing, but first there must be 
an apple, nuts and a paper sack of 
candy carefully tucked into the foot. 

Christmas morning thrills and sur- 
prises start at daybreak, and soon after 
breakfast, relatives gather from neigh- 




The emblem of elegant dining 

Eighteen-Steps-Down 

Cozy, intimate bar, serving 
your favorite drinks. 

Continental Dining Room 

for elegant dining 

Fleur-de-Lis Lounge 

MISCIIANTON'S Open for luncheon & dinner 

Cafe' de Paris 

Sidewalk cafe' 

MISCHANTON'S 

Eastpoint Shopping Center at Open nightly til 2 a.m. 
Northpoint Rd. & Eastern Ave. ample parking 
ATwater 8-0130 



AfaliflcM. 



boring villages. The kitchen is filled 
with smells of holiday foods while the 
house bubbles with happiness. 

Here the Christmas season has an or- 
dained purpose. Here God fearing men 
and women bow their heads to the 
Lord as they worship in the simple 
churches whose spires point high into 
the surrounding countryside. 

The Spirit of Christmas and the holi- 
days for all of us, regardless of city or 
country, is a period of happiness. Un- 
fortunately for us of the city, with our 
hectic way of life, we lose sight of the 
beauty and simplicity of a rural Christ- 
mas. Why not take time out some after- 
noon during the Christmas season and 
drive out into a village close by — you'll 
be happy you did. 



The Shopping districts of Baltimore 
are gay and colorful for the Holiday 
season and we drove out to Eastpoint, 
to visit the fine shops and call on 
John Faraclas, who together with Mi- 
chael Mallis, are managers of the very 
fine MISCHANTON RESTAURANT 
in Baltimore's newest Eastpoint Shop- 
ping Center, where the firm is celebrat- 
ing it's first anniversary. 

Anton Andrews and Mischa Migin- 
sky are in charge of the kitchen and 
from the names Mischa and Anton the 
firm name MISCHANTON is fast 
growing into prominence in Baltimore. 

This modern and cheerful restaurant, 
which has a continental air of charm, 
opened its doors in November 1956 
and already has been awarded three 
national honors. One for superlative 
achievement in sanitation by Institu- 
tions Magazine; an award for archi- 
tectural splendor by the Baltimore As- 
sociation of Commerce, and a third 



he 5 



tlSeautiPul k^lolk 

JEANETTE BECK, INC 



DRESSES 

1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONES: 
MULBERRY 5-1445 
VERNON 7-9574 



40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



'Jamesi 



award for culinary arts by the Stewards 
and Caterers Club. 

Mr. Mallis and Mr. Faraclas have 
college degrees as chemical engineer and 
in business management respectively, 
however, they are both interested in the 
food industry and for a number of 
years operated Industrial Foods Service 
for Bethlehem Steel Company and 
Sparrows Point Shipbuilding Company. 

The original MISCH ANTON Res- 
taurant was opened in the Edmondson 
Village Shopping Center a few years 
ago and, although it is small, it is a 
popular eating house and served as a 
stepping stone toward expansion. 

The new MISCHANTON, far away 
from downtown Baltimore, is ultra 
modern in every detail and was con- 
structed at a cost of over a quarter of 
a million dollars. There are four beauti- 
fully designed rooms for dining and 
the decor by William O. Steinmetz 
and Betty Cooke of Baltimore's Tyson 
Street, is superb. 

The Sidewalk Cafe is a gay informal 
dining room in which decorations are 
changed with the season. This room 
has a Parisian air, which Baltimore 
has not experienced, before the daring 




Wonder 

Silk 

Store 

See Our 

Complete Line of Quality Fabrics 

DRESS MATERIALS & TRIMMINGS 

CUSTOM MADE SLIP COVERS & DRAPERIES 

8571 Georgia Ave. - Silver Spring, Md. 

JUniper 9-9619 
Open Monday, Thursday & Friday Nights 



Gifts of Distinction • Ob jets d'Art 



CREATIVE DESIGNS 

• PRECIDUS STDNES 
• WATCHES 



C. J. ANDERSON 

Graduate Gemologist, G.I.A. 

— Jeweler — 

119 W. SARATOGA STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. LE 9-6342 




NOEL 



of MISCHANTON. The Main dining 
room has a formal Continental atmos- 
phere. 

The room we liked best was the 
Fleur-de-lis Room beautifully decorated 
with brilliant Fleur-de-lis of Royal and 
Regal colors on one wall, while, to the 
far side of this room, which is heavily 
carpeted, the wall is decorated with 
elegant foreign travel posters and in 
the center o\ it is a large table, circled 
about a pillar, which holds fruits and 
wines — a very attractive arrangement 
with the flavor of old Paris. 

Eighteen-Steps-Down is the Bar and 
Rathskeller. This room is decorated in 
nudes. 

Wilson and Christy, of Towson, were 
the architects who helped build the 
restaurant. It was planned from the 
minutest detail to be "more than a 




TRADE MIRK 




STtnUNG 
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Ocnotield 

'D.j, 9 r..-» <>«l Makers 

C>{erlina iSfilv'erware 

Charles *l Pleasant Sis IJaUlmore.l.Md 



inu inc. 



<«">»«<"»>«<"»X«"»K«-3^ 




Maryland's Oldest and 
Largest Furrier 
BALTIMORE I 

<- » )«<■ ■ )»«< "» »«:< ■ • >»«< • .) » 4<fr<g r 

225 N. HOWARD STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



THE FASHIONABLE 

westchester 

DINING ROOM 

i g t~ _-i 

»^i ■»■ I ■? ■ Finest Cuisine -Served graciously in quiet luxury 

Superb wine cellar. For reservations call Arnold — WOodley 6-7700 

Cocktail* In "The lounge" or Dining room 

th © holiday rOOm Exquisite private accommodations 

for ten to fifty guests. 400 o CATHEDRAL avenue 

Free Parking for Dinner Guests from 6 to 10 P.M. IN MAIN GARAGE 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



41 



4fe* 



Matiutasid f lt/o4n&n 




GEORGE H. STIEBER CO., 

TOWSON, MD. 
FOOD SPECIALISTS 



Furs and Clothes 
of Distinction 

fP P 



FOUNDED l©33 



1220 Charles Street, North 
Baltimore, Md. 



The Best 
'Northern Chinese 

Food in the 
. Nation's Capital 






"We Entertain 

More Diplomats Daily 

Than the White 

House" 

International 
Cocktails 

Yenching Palace 

3524 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

(at Porter St.) 
EM 2-6358 Wash., D. Cr 



restaurant going into a building" — it is 
a building around a well planned and 
designed institution. 

All of the kitchen equipment, of shin- 
ing stainless steel, represents the latest 
design of the restaurant industry for 
durability and quality. 



Charles Street in Baltimore, as usual, 
is decorated in festive array and the 
shops are filled to the overflowing with 
magnificent suggestions for Christmas 
giving. We stopped by to call on one 
of Baltimore's finest furniture houses, 
WM. P. STEIN, INC. at 401 N. 
CHARLES STREET. They have a 
wonderful assortment of tables, mirrors 
and lamps, all of which would make 
excellent Christmas gifts. These "gifts 
for the home" will go on giving for 
many years and one can find hundreds 
of perfect gifts at STEIN'S. 

Chests, desks and other occasional 
pieces in Eighteenth Century or Con- 
temporary design can be found to fit 
in any home. 

Their decorating shop has personal- 
ized service and there is no charge for 
this service in the selection of the right 
fabrics for draperies, upholstery, etc. 

In their new location, just a few 
doors from their former store, you are 
invited to come in and browse around. 



Books that are "Good Reading" for 
November-December from the COKES- 
BURY BOOK STORE. 516 NORTH 
CHARLES STREET, are as follows: 
Fiction: 

By Love Possessed 
The House Party 
Atlas Shrugged 
Below the Salt 

Non-Fiction: 

Colonial Living 

Dictionary of Contemporary Ameri- 
can Usage 

Looking South 

Looking North 

Rascals In Paradise 

The World of Pooh 

America, America, America 

Life Photographers; Their Careers 
and Favorite Pictures. 





A Bit of Old Italy in 
the Nation's Capital 

• 

Italian Cuisine 
Choice N.Y. Cut Steaks 

Luncheon - Dinner - Late Supper 

1143 New Hampshire Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. ME 8-298S 




r /funHjucij 

HICKORY SMOKED AGED 
HAMS 

WRITE OR STOP BY 

Southern ^rarmi 

6 Miles North of Frederick 
on Route 194 

WALKERSVILLE. MD. 

Vinewood 5-2621 

Open Daily 8 to 5 Sunday 12 to 6 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Books 

Educational Games 
and Toys 

Stationery and 

Greeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

' BaUimoAe. 'i Gidtuwl jbepaAt*ne*tt State' 

\ WE M" 'OS'* 6 '/ Mall ond phone orders shipped promptly. 
ON A.LL » 00KJ \ Write for free Book Cotoloe. 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 

Phone SA. 7-7280 

Baltimore. Md. 



42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dentistry 

Continued from page 39 



Falls Community Concerts Association 
and is an active member of the local 
Fine Arts Club and the Operetta Club. 
As a student at the Baltimore Medical 
College, Dr. Garrett played violin in 
the early days of the Baltimore Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Music is his favorite 
avocation and he still plays the violin 
and the viola. 

Dr. Tosh E. Elkins, '16, has been 
practicing in Dunbar, W. Va., since 
1918. He had previously practiced in 
East Bank, W. Va. During his career 
he has participated in many areas of 
activity besides his professional inter- 
ests. A Past President of the Kanawha 
Valley Dental Society (1936), Dr. 
Elkins was Secretary of the Dunbar 
Chamber of Commerce for nine years 
and Chairman of the Dunbar Fire De- 
partment for ten years. He is a Past 
Master of Dunbar Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 
and was its Secretary for fourteen years. 

Dr. George J. Boyles, '53, is practic- 
ing at 320 Fairmont Ave., Fairmont. 
W. Va. Dr. Boyles served in the Army 
following his graduation. 

Dr. Donald E. Cone, '56, is stationed 
at Fort Hood, Texas. 

Dr. Wilbur D. Burton, '37. of Balti- 
more, is President of the Maryland 
State Board of Dental Examiners, to 
which he was appointed in 1953. Dr. 
Burton was separated from the Army 
with the rank of Major after four years 
with the Johns Hopkins Hospital Unit 
(118th General Hospital). 

Dr. David H. Dosh, '44, has been 
associated with the U.S.V.A. since 1947 
and is presently assigned to the Veter- 
ans Benefits Office in Washington, D. C. 
Dr. Dosh served in the Navy from 
1944 to 1946. David is the brother of 
Dr. Stanley H. Dosh '35. 

Dr. Metro Dry-Henich, '47, recently 
opened an office in Fords, N. J. He had 
practiced in Perth Amboy, N. J. before 
and following his tour of service in the 
U.S.A.F., 1951-53. 

Dr. George L. Bozzi, '55, is prac- 
ticing at 34 South Whittlesey Ave., 
Wallingford, Conn. 

Dr. Ralph D. Crawford, '18, prac- 
ticed in New York City until 1943 
when he removed to Monroe, N. Y. He 
was elected Mayor of Monroe in 1947. 

Dr. Kenneth E. Bertram, '56, is prac- 
ticing in New Cumberland, Pa. Dr. 
Bertram served in the Army from 1943 
to 1946. 

Dr. Henry J. Bianco, '56, is stationed 
at Fort Jackson, S. C. 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



Dr. Harry A. Dochelli, 14. retired in 
1947 after thirty-three years ol practice 
in Waterbury (1915-35) and I orring- 
ton (1935-47). Leaving his native 
Connecticut he chose to spend his 
years of retirement in Sanford, Fla. 
However, Dr. Dochelli came out of re- 
tirement in September, 1948 to accept 
appointment as Chief Dentist at the 
Central State Hospital in Petersburg, 
Va. — and he is still there. 

Dr. William P. G. Dodson, "48. be- 
gan specializing in Orthodontics in 1954 
following postgraduate study at the 
University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Dod- 
son interned at the Childrens' Medical 
Center in Boston. Between July, 1949 
and August, 1952 he served in the 
Navy. Dr. Dodson has offices in Arling- 
ton and Fredericksburg, Va. 

Dr. Louis F. Coroso, '35, of Hartford, 
Conn., is a Past President of the Hart- 
ford Dental Society (1954). He was 
the first Grand Knight of West Hart- 
ford Council, K. of C. (1953). From 
1942 to 1946 Dr. Coroso served in the 
Army, with the rank of Captain. He is 
a member of the Advisory Board of the 
House of the Good Shepherd (1955- 
— ) . He has been on the Dental Staff 
of St. Francis Hospital since 1940 and 
the Chief of Dental Service, House of 
the Good Shepherd since 1954. 

Dr. Alex L. Boro, '38, of Annapolis, 
Md., is President of the Anne Arundel 
County Dental Society. Dr. Boro is a 
Director of the Colonial Building Asso- 
ciation, Annapolis and is a part owner 
of the Dutch Mill Restaurant. 

Dr. Euripides E. Cosimi, '25, is Chief 
of Dental Service at the V.A. Center in 
San Juan, P.R. Dr. Cosimi practiced in 
Baltimore from graduation until his 
entering the Army in 1941. On his 
separation in 1946 as a Lieutenant 
Colonel, he became associated with the 
V.A. Dr. Cosimi is a Fellow of the 
American College of Dentists. 

Dr. Nicholas A. Giuditta, '38, of 
Westfield, N. J., is President of the 
Plainfield Dental Society. He interned 
in the USPHS at Norfolk, Va. and re- 
turned to the Service for a tour of duty, 
1942-46. Dr. Giuditta was President 
of the Civic Club for four years; mem- 
ber of the Board of the Adult Educa- 
tion School for six years; and a member 
of the Board of the Council of Com- 
munity Relations for six years. 

Dr. Roy H. Bridger has been affili- 
ated with the Montgomery County 
(Md.) Health Department since 1941. 
Dr. Bridger was at the McDowell 
County (W. Va.) Clinic, 1926-29; in 
private practice in Cambridge, Md., 
1930-39; and with the Maryland State 

(Continued on next page) 



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Department of Health, 1939-41. He is 
a Past President of the Southern Mary- 
land Dental Society, 1951-52. 

Dr. Theodore Gorfine, '44, of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., is on the Staffs of Otis 
General Hospital, Cambridge; Kenmore 
Hospital, Boston; and Central Hospital, 
Somerville. He has contributed two 
articles to Dental Survey. He has taken 
three postgraduate courses at Tufts, in 
prosthetics, oral surgery, and general 
anesthesia. Dr. Gorfine is President of 
the Brotherhood of Temple B'nai Brith 
and was for two terms Commander of 
the Somerville Post of Jewish War 
Veterans. Following his graduation he 
served in the Navy, 1944-46. 

Dr. Harry W. Hicks, 09. of Brook- 
line, Mass., retired in 1946. Dr. Hicks 
had practiced in Maiden, for five years, 
and Boston. 

Dr. Clifford J. Buckley, '22, of Bridge, 
port, served two terms on the Connecti- 
cut Dental Commission, 1946-56. He 
is a Past President of the Bridgeport 
Dental Association and a Fellow of the 
International College of Dentists 
(1947). He was Chairman of Arrange- 
ments for nine annual meetings of the 
State Association. In World War I 
Dr. Buckley served for two years, 
chiefly overseas. 

Dr. Cornelius D. Hogan, '29, who 
practices in Burlington, N. J., has been 
Senior Dentist at the New Jersey State 
Prison Hospital, Trenton, since 1930. 

Dr. Merrill C. Hills, of Hartford, 
Conn., is Commodore of the Duck 
Island Yacht Club. Dr. Hills is a Past 
President of the Hartford Dental So- 
ciety (1948). 

Dr. Morris G. Bernert, '19, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., is a prominent figure in 
Connecticut Masonry. He is Past Wor- 
shipful Master of Master Level Lodge 
(1937) and of Philosophic Lodge of 
Research (1946). In 1943 and 1944 
he was District Deputy Grand Master 
of the Sixth Masonic District. Dr. 
Bernert is a Past President of the Hart- 
ford Dental Society (1934) and has 
served as Chairman of the Committees 
on Awards and on Membership of the 
State Society. 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover, '25, of Dun- 
dalk. Md., is a charter member and the 
first President of the Baltimore County 
Dental Society (1954). He was an In- 
structor in Exodontia and X-ray at his 
alma mater, 1925-28. Dr. Hoover is a 
charter member and Past President of 
the Rotary Club, former Chairman of 
the Zoning Appeal Board for Baltimore 
County, 1946-50, and Past Commodore 
of the Sparrows Point Yacht Club. He 
owns and operates the Dundalk Medi- 
cal Arts Building. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dr. James C. Johnson, '34, of Cam- 
bridge, Md., is a Past President of the 
Eastern Shore Dental Society ( 1 945 ) . 
Dr. Johnson operates a farm of 225 
acres and. like most Eastern Shoremen, 
has a strong predilection for hunting, 
fishing, and boating. 

Dr. Bernard Helit/er, "42, began prac- 
ticing in Wichita, Kansas, in 1946 fol- 
lowing his separation from the Army 
as a Major. He is the Editor of the 
Wichita Dental Society Bulletin. Dr. 
Helitzer married Elinor L. Steinberg in 
1944. They have a daughter, Jacque- 
line, who is nine. 

Dr. Donald Kaplan. '54. was separ- 
ated from the USAF in October. He is 
now taking a postgraduate course in 
Orthodontics at Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Earl J. Hendrickson. Gold Medal 
man of the Class of 1952, opened an 
office last summer in the Professional 
Building, Fort Pierce, Fla. Dr. Hend- 
rickson received his discharge in June 
from the USAF after four years of 
service. 

Dr. William L. Keefer, '52, entered 
the Army after graduation. On his dis- 
charge in 1954 he was commissioned 
a Captain in the USAF. He is presently 
assigned to Kindley AFB, Bermuda. 

Dr. Howard C. Hester, '44, served in 
the Navy from 1944 to 1947. He had 
a general practice in Englewood, N. J., 
1947-54. In 1948-49 he studied Ortho- 
dontics at Columbia. Since 1950 he has 
specialized in Orthodontics in Glen 
Ridge, N. J. Dr. Hester is Public Rela- 
tions Chairman of the Essex County 
Dental Society (1953- ) and is Editor 
of the Bulletin of the New Jersey So- 
ciety of Dentistry for Children. 

Dr. Louis J. Berdon (Berdofsky), '22, 
of New Haven, Conn., has held the 
highest office in three fraternal organ- 
izations: Grand Master in the I.O.O.F., 
Monarch of Hejaz Grotto, M.O.V.- 
P.E.R., and Chancellor of the Fidelity 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He is also 
a member of Cosmopolitan Lodge, A.F. 
& A.M. Dr. Berdon has been continu- 
ally active in charity projects on both 
local and state levels. He served in the 
Army Dental Corps from 1941 to 1945, 
and was separated with the rank of 
Captain. 

Dr. Lawrence W. Houston, '18, of 
Baltimore, was a member of the Balti- 
more City Council, representing the 
Third District, 1927-31. 

Dr. Arthur J. Kershaw, '32, of West 
Warwick, R. I., is a Past President of 
the Kent County Dental Society, the 
Rhode Island Society of Dentistry for 
Children and the Davis Study Club. He 
has presented papers and clinics in 

(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



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thirteen states. He is a Past President 
of the Lions Club (1941) and a former 
District Commissioner, Boy Scouts of 
America. During his service in the 
Army, 1953-55, Dr. Kershaw was Chief 
of Dental Service at the Murphy Army 
Hospital, Mass. With five sons and two 
daughters, he is offering good competi- 
tion with Kyrle Preis '29 and James 
Corthouts '36. 

Dr. Alwyn Hundley, '27, of Balti- 
more, is a Commander in the "Ready 
Reserve." During the World War he 
served in the Navy, with assignments 
in the North Pacific and the South 
Pacific. Dr. Hundley is a Director of 
the North Gay Street Building and 
Loan Association. 

Dr. Oscar D. Jackson, '53, began 
practice in Bainbridge, Ga.. shortly after 
graduation. He served in the Navy 
during the World War, chiefly in the 
South Pacific. Dr. Jackson is President 
of the Kiwanis Club. He is the son 
of Dr. Robert W. Jackson, of the U. of 
M. Class of 1900. 

Dr. Leonard H. Jarvis, '55, entered 
the Army on July 1, following an in- 
ternship at the University of Maryland 
Hospital. He is assigned, with the rank 
of Captain, to Fort Hood, Texas. 

Dr. Mario F. Ramirez, '42, of San- 
turce, P. R., has been a pilot in the 
Civil Air Patrol since 1950. His duties 
include the teaching of cadets. Dr. 
Ramirez served in the Army Dental 
Corps from 1942 to his discharge in 
April 1946 with the rank of captain. 
He was President of the Maryland 
Alumni of Puerto Rico in 1955. 

Dr. Marsden F. Stamp, '47, of Elmira, 
N. Y., is President of the Chemung 
County Dental Society. 

Dr. Charles R. Farley, '55, of Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., is Assistant Professor of 
Prosthodontics at the West Liberty 
State College, Department of Dental 
Hygiene. 

Dr. Norman C. Thurlow, '1 2, of Frye- 
burg, Me., has been VA dentist in his 
area since World War I. He is a Past 
Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias 
and a Past Master of his Masonic 
Lodge. 

Dr. David Lewis, '48, of Wheaton. 
Md., is engaged in a project of the Na- 
tional Guard Bureau at the Pentagon 
"to survey and study the effectiveness 
and utilization of dental officer person- 
nel in the Air National Guard." Dr. 
Lewis has been affiliated with the Mary- 
land National Guard (1948-49. 1950- 
53), National Guard of the U.S. (1949- 
50 — active duty), and the District of 
Columbia Air National Guard (1953- 

)• 

Dr. John O. Knapp. '51. practiced in 



46 



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Morgan timn. W. Va.. 1951-56, On 
October I he began a Residency in 

Prosthetics at the VA Hospital in Hous- 
ton, Texas. Dr. Knapp served in the 
Navy, l l >42-46. and was separated as 
a Lieutenant (j.g.). 

Dr. Blaine E. Jarrett, '56, is sta- 
tioned at the AF Hospital in Anchorage, 
Alaska. 

Dr. Edward I . Howard, '53, was re- 
leased from active duty with the Aims 
in October. [955. Dr. Howard is prac- 
ticing in Point Pleasant, W. Va. 

Dr. Roy L. Lowman. '50. of Buck- 
hannon, W. Va., is President of the 
Monongahela Valley Dental Society. Dr. 
Lowman served in the Army during the 
World War, 1942-46. 

Dr. James L. Trone. '26. of Elkton, 
Md.. is a charter member and the first 
President of the kiwanis Club. Dr. 
Trone is President of the Elkton Com- 
pany, a Trustee of West Nottingham 
Academy and a Director of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

Dr. James G. Kerwin. '12, has been 
Director of the Dental Division, De- 
partment of Health of Passaic. N. J., 
since 1927. In World War 1 Dr. Ker- 
win served in the Army from Septem- 
ber, 1917 to January, 1919. He is a 
Fellow of the American Academy of 
Medicine. 

Dr. Hiroshi B. Hirano, '53, is practic- 
ing in Hanapepe, Kauai, Hawaii. Dur- 
ing the World War Dr. Hirano served 
in the Military Intelligence Language 
School. 

Dr. Charles J. Galiardi, '56, is in the 
Air Force, assigned to the 317th TAC 
Hospital in Germany. 

Dr. Jules J. Levin, '56, is stationed at 
the U.S. Coast Guard T.C., Cape May, 
N. J. He is the son of Dr. Harry Levin 
'26, of Baltimore. 

Dr. Stanley Kogan, '54, interned at 
Sinai Hospital, Baltimore. He spent the 
academic year of 1955-56 doing post- 
graduate work in Oral Surgery at Tufts. 
In June Dr. Kogan entered the Army; 
he is now stationed at Fort Hood. 
Texas. 

Dr. Robert H. Enterline is practicing 
at 23 North Lime St., Lancaster, Pa. 
He served in the Army 1945-48 and was 
separated as a First Lieutenant. 

Dr. Robert L. Heldrich '55 interned 
at the University Hospital. He was com- 
missioned as a Captain in the Army in 
July, 1956 and is now at Fort Meade, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Harry Teter, '28, of Frostburg, 
Md., is a Past President of the Allegany- 
Garrett County Dental Association 
(1952) and of the Rotary Club (1951). 

Dr. Albert A. Kapsak. '56, is in the 
(Continued on next page) 



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Army, assigned to Fort Belvoir, Va. 

Dr. George A. Lowander, '40. re- 
turned to his practice in East Setauket, 
N. Y., after a two-year tour of duty 
(1953-55) in Japan as Dental Surgeon 
of the First Cavalry Division. He was 
separated with the rank of Major. 

Dr. Leonard G. Henschel. '56. is as- 
signed to the Bainbridge NTC. 

Dr. Armand S. Hall, '56, is stationed 
at the USPH Indian Hospital, Belcourt. 
North Dakota. 

Dr. William R. Riser, '23, of Rom- 
ney, W. Va., is a Past President of the 
Potomac Valley Dental Society (three 
terms) and the charter President of the 
Lions Club. A veteran of World War 
I. Dr. Riser served in the Army from 
June, 1918 to May. 1919. 

Dr. Jose R. Torres, '50, has practiced 
in Yauco, P. R. since 1954. He is on 
the Staff of the San German Municipal 
Hospital. Dr. Torres was separated 
from the Army in 1953 with the rank 
of Captain. 

Dr. James H. Langley. '47, of Man- 
chester, N. H., is President of the 
Manchester Dental Society. Dr. Lang- 
ley served in the Air Force, 1950-52. 
Dr. Philip E. Denu, '54, was dis- 
charged from the Air Force in August. 
Dr. Denu is practicing in Ridgewood, 
New Jersey. 

Dr. Renneth M. Tucker, '53, is prac- 
ticing in Logan, W. Va. Dr. Tucker 
served in the Air Force, 1943-46. 

Dr. Harry J. Rohlhepp, '53, is prac- 
ticing at 7625 Bellona Ave., Ruxton, 
Md. Dr. Rohlhepp was separated from 
the Army in July, 1955. 

Dr. Joseph A. Lucia, '55, is practicing 
at 110 Broad St., Milford, Pa. Dr. 
Lucia, a Sergeant Major in the Eleventh 
Airborne Division, was in the Army 
from December, 1945 to September, 
1949. 

Dr. Roberto Torres. '50, is practicing 
in Juncos, P. R. Dr. Torres served in 
the Army, 1940-46, and was separated 
as a Captain. 

Dr. Michael A. Costrino. '56. began 
practice in September at 203 Main St., 
Milford, Mass. Dr. Costrino served in 
the Navy during the World War. 

Dr. Gordon Trust, '53, of Fall River, 
Mass., is President of the Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Dr. Trust served in 
the Navy, 1945-46. 

Dr. Gifford L. Ely. '12. retired in 
1953 and now resides in Winter Park, 
Fla. A Past President of the Bergen 
County Dental Society, he had prac- 
ticed in Westwood. N. J. Dr. Ely was 
President of Rotary and served as its 
Treasurer for twenty years. 

Dr. Hervey A. Lupien, '55, is practic- 
ing at 33 Main St., Danielson. Conn. 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dr. Lupicn served in the Army, 1946- 
1949. 

Dr. Gilbert Tronier, '56, Gold Medal 
man of his class, is interning at the 
U.S.P.H.S. Hospital in Seattle, Wash. 

Dr. Irvin B. Golboro, '28, of Balti- 
more, retired from the active practice 
of dentistry on January I, 1956. In 
1937 he helped to establish the Southern 
Galvanizing Company. Dr. Golboro 
retired in order to devote his full time 
to his duties as President of the com- 
pany, which employs 100 persons. He 
was a National Regent of Alpha Omega 
in 1933-34 and Chancellor of the Balti- 
more alumni group in 1940-41. 

Dr. Charles R. Milne. '40. of White 
River Junction, Vermont, is President 
of the Cohasse Valley Dental Society. 
Dr. Milne served in the Army Air 
Corps, 1942-44. 

Dr. William L. Fridinger, '51, is prac- 
ticing in Miami, where he opened an 
office in 1953 after service in the USAF. 
Dr. Byron C. Woodside, '56, is as- 
signed to the Philadelphia Naval Base. 
Dr. Byron E. Searle, 'II, of Water- 
town, Mass., retired in 1952. 

Dr. Harry L. Mertz, '56, is stationed 
at the Valley Forge Army Hospital. 

Dr. Gilbert G. Youngblood. '56, is 
practicing in Martinsburg, W. Va. Dr. 
Youngblood served in the Army during 
the World War. 

Dr. Donald C. Weikert, '56. is sta- 
tioned at the U.S.N. Hospital in Chel- 
sea, Mass. 

Dr. William W. Merow. '51, of Graf- 
ton, W. Va., is President of the Kiwanis 
Club. 

Dr. August Novak. '15, retired in 
1955 after forty-one years of practice in 
Baltimore, his native city. 

Dr. Charles A. Ridgeway, '56, is prac- 
ticing in Phoenix, Ariz. Dr. Ridgeway 
served in the Navy, 1946-48. 

Dr. Robert P. Murphy, '56, is sta- 
tioned at the N.A.S., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Dr. H. Clay Watson, '10, has prac- 
ticed in Waco, Texas, since 1919. A 
Lieutenant in the Dental Corps, he 
served from July, 1917 to July, 1919, 
chiefly in France and Germany. Dr. 
Watson is a Past President of the 
Central Texas Dental Society (1925). 

Dr. Eldorus H. Palmer, '17, retired 
in 1947. Dr. Palmer entered the Army 
Dental Corps in 1917 and served with 
the 77th Division. He was separated 
in 1919 as a Captain. During the next 
three years he was in the U.S.P.H.S., 
with assignments in Pittsburgh, Phila- 
delphia, and Washington. From 1922 
to his retirement he practiced in Troy, 
N. Y. Dr. Palmer is a Past President 
of the Lions Club. 

(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



KENMAR 
STEEL 

CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



structural steel erection 

setting reinforcing steel 

] 2041 K St., N.W. 
. Washington, D. C. 
j STerling 3-3290 



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Phone TAylor 9-3932 849 Upshur St., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 11,D.C. 



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FOR INTERIOR 



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STANDARD ART MARBLE and TILE CO. 

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Telephone NAtional 8-7413 



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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dr. Marion P. Nicholson, '52, of 
Raleigh, N. C, is President of the Lions 
Club. Dr. Nicholson served in the Air 
Force, 1942-46. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



M. Marjorie MacMurray 



GOLWAY JOINS KAISER ALUMINUM 

Harrison C. Golway, Jr., '57, has been 
assigned to the training program at the 
Halethorpe Extrusion Works of the 
Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Cor- 
poration. He holds a B.S. degree in 
Industrial Education and while at the 
University was a member of Sigma Nu 
fraternity. 

RUTH STANLEY ATTENDS WORKSHOP 

Ruth Stanley, '55, attended the Fourth 
National Aviation Education Workshop 
at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, last 
summer. More than 300 elementary, 
secondary and college teachers, and 
Civil Air Patrol senior members and 
cadets obtained academic credit and 
received many first-hand aviation ex- 
periences at the seminar. 

RECEIVE ADVANCED DEGREES 

Edmond Victor Bartas, '53, William 
Donald Brockmeyer, '51, and Lonnie 
Frances Caming Carton, M.Ed. '51, 
received advanced degrees from the 
Pennsylvania State University during 
the summer of 1957. Mr. Bartas re- 
ceived an M.Ed, in art education and 
Mr. Brockmeyer an M.S. in meteor- 
ology. Lonnie Carton was awarded a 
D.Ed, in elementary education. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

Col. O. H. Saunders '10 

A. Lawrence Guess '51 



NEWS OF JUNE GRADUATES 

Several of this year's engineering gradu- 
ates have recently accepted appoint- 
ments with Bendix Aviation Corpora- 
tion, Radio Division, in Baltimore, 
Maryland. Those at Bendix include 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



Ciordon H. Souder, George 1 . Behm, 
Thomas M. Li, David ( Sinus. 
George D. Wagner, Oriu I). Winn. 
Mahmoud Fakhoury, and Norig G. 
Ashed. Alter an indoctrination period, 
they will be concerned with the design 
and development of such diversified 
products .is radar, air traffic control 
systems, two-way mobile communica- 
tion, automotive radio, and navigational 
equipment for both civilian and militai \ 
application. 

Charles Ci. Pettit IV recently reported 
to the Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. 

John Ditman has accepted a gradu- 
ate assistantship at Case Institute of 
Technology, Cleveland, Ohio. 

PR1VAI. AT M.I.T. 

Harris G. Prival, '53, is enrolled as a 
graduate student at Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology in Electrical Engi- 
neering holding a research assistantship 
in the Dynamic Analysis and Control 
Laboratory there. 

WHEATLEY CO-AUTHORS PAPER 

Carl F. Wheatley, '5 1 , recently co- 
authored a paper entitled "Transistor 
Stabilization by Diode Biasing" for the 
RCA Engineer. Mr. Wheatley is em- 
ployed by RCA as a design engineer. 

MCFALL JOINS GENERAL ELECTRIC 

Russell W. McFall, '43, who joined 
General Electric on the Engineering 
Program at graduation is Manager, 
Engineering, Special Defense Projects 
Department and he is responsible for 
the design of all department products. 

PROF. LUDFORD STUDIES AT HARVARD 

Professor G. S. S. Ludford of the Insti- 
tute for Fluid Dynamics will be on 
sabbatical leave during 1957-58 to carry 
out research in the Mathematical 
Theory of Compressible Flow at Har- 
vard University. His work is supported 
by a Sabbatical Leave Contract with 
the Air Force Office of Scientific Re- 
search and the Simon Guggenheim 
Memorial Fellowship. 

PROF. BURGERS ORGANIZES SYMPOSIUM 

Professor J. M. Burgers of the Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics was Chairman of 
the Organizing Committee and a par- 
ticipant at the Third Symposium on 
Cosmical Gas Dynamics held at the 
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts in June, 
1957. He was also one of the invited 
speakers at the Seminar of Applied 
Mathematics held by the American 
(Continued on next page) 



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Construction Co., Inc. 

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51 



FRENCH RESTAURANTS 



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Free Parking after 6 P.M. 



RIVE GAUCHE 

The Newest French Restaurant 
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Closed Sundays 
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Building Supplies Of All Kinds 

LUMBER, MILLWORK 
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P.O. HYATTSVILLE. MD. 
Phone WArfield 7-2205 



James D. Kemper Co. 



4620 WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W. 
EMERSON 3-2345 



K. 



epreientinq . . . 
Keystone Roofing Mfg. Co. 

ASPHALT SHINGLES AND ROLL ROOFING, 
COPPER AND RE-ENFORCED PAPER, BUILDING 
PAPERS, POLYETHYLENE FILM 

Supradur Corp. of New York 

ASBESTOS ROOFING AND SIDING 

Red Cedar Sidewalls Ltd. 

WOOD SHAKES AND SHINGLES 

Marshall Stamping Co. 

DOWNSPOUTS AND GUTTERS. AREAWALLS 
LINTELS AND PULL DOWN STAIRWAYS 

Penn Metal Company 

METAL LATH AND ACCESSORIES 
METAL PARTITION SYSTEMS 

Special Sections, Inc. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CHANNEL IRON 
TIE WIRE AND HANGER WIRE 

Ohio Lime Company 

REGULAR AND AUTOCLAVED FINISH LINE 

Airseal Insulations, Inc. 

"SPUN" ROCKWOOL BATTS AND BLANKETS 

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6228 BALTIMORE AVE. 
R1VERDALE, MD. 



52 



Mathematical Society in Boulder, Colo- 
rado in June, 1957. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS PROGRESS 

James H. Bramble, Research Assistant 
in the Institute for Fluid Dynamics has 
accepted a position with the General 
Electric Company in Cincinnati, Ohio 
where he will work in the computation 
laboratory on stress analysis problems. 
Jack Norton, former graduate student 
in Electrical Engineering, is an engineer 
in IBM's Binghampton-Endicott Divi- 
sion in Binghampton, New York. 

MARYLAND MEN AT MARTIN 

John P. Hudak, '56, is with the Martin 
Company in Baltimore working in the 
P6M Seamaster Project as an engineer 
doing design and development work in 
the Support Equipment Group. Sheldon 
Koellish, '54, is in charge of the tech- 
nical group on instrumentation for the 
P6M. 

J. Robert Esher, Jr., '43, has had a 
variety of assignments at the Martin 
Company including Staff Design Spe- 
cialist for Circuit Analysis, Group En- 
gineer on an automatic data processing 
project, and Acting Section Chief. He 
is now Supervisor of the Electronics 
Reconnaisance Subsection in the Elec- 
tronics Department. 

N. Elliott Felt, Jr., '50, has one of 
the most exciting jobs offered in today's 
engineering world. As Operations Man- 
ager of the Vanguard project, he is 
responsible for divisional activities 
necessary for the development of the 
rocket which will boost the history- 
making IGY satellites into their orbits. 

Bastian "Buzz" Hello, '47, B-57 Proj- 
ect Engineer, is responsible for engi- 
neering effort including aero, stress, 
electronics, control and flight test. 

George Wannall, '42, is a Project En- 
gineer on air-to-surface missiles in the 
Orlando, Florida division. Prior to his 
current assignment, he was an Assistant 
Project Engineer on the B-57 and on 
the Oriole, and an expert on airframe 
vibration in the Dynamics Section. 

William R. McCormack, '50, is in 
charge of the design of the airborne 
electronic guidance system for the 
Martin Company's Lacrosse surface-to- 
surface missile. Formerly he designed 
guidance systems for the Matador and 
other missiles, and he worked on the 
design of a digital data handling system. 

A. Lawrence Guess, '51, a Senior 
Engineer, teaches "Analytical Methods 
for New Design" and among other 
things, establishes preliminary design 
criteria for missiles and aircraft. 

Modern aircraft require large power 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



systems to furnish electricity to the 
many electronic mechanisms. Dak- 
Scott is the Chief Engineer of the 
Electrical Section at the Martin Com- 
pany. His section designs the power 
generation and distribution systems for 
Martin aircraft and missiles. 

Carl G. Auld, '56, who has been 
Lead Engineer for the design and de- 
velopment of test equipment for the 
"Bullpup" missile, is now a Staff Engi- 
neer for the Support Equipment Design 
Department. 

ALUMNI ELECTIONS 

S. Chester Ward, '32, member and past 
president of the Engineering Alumni 
Board, was re-elected in May, 1957, to 
a second term as City Councilman, 
District 2, College Park. He is en- 
gaged in engineering development work 
with Washington Gas Light Company. 

Charles R. Hayleck, Jr., '43, was 
elected President of the Engineering 
Alumni Board for a one-year term last 
June. He is Associate Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering at the Uni- 
versity. 

EUMONT ACCEPTS POSITION 

H. W. Eumont, Jr., '52, has accepted 
a position with the newly-formed Amo- 
co Chemicals Corporation, subsidiary 
of Standard Oil of Indiana, as Assistant 
to the Vice President of Marketing. 

SENSER APPOINTED CHIEF ENGINEER 

Lisle H. Senser, Jr., '44, has been ap- 
pointed Chief Mechanical Engineer, 
Construction Division, Gulf District, 
U. S. Corps of Engineers, Tehran, Iran. 
Mr. Senser was previously with the 
Office of the Chief of Engineers, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mrs. Senser and their 
children are also in Tehran. 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



APPOINTED TO COMMISSION 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, Professor of 
Administrative Law and Constitutional 
Law, is one of 12 persons designated by 
Governor McKeldin to constitute a 
Self-Survey Commission charged with 
studying the State government and rec- 
ommending changes. Dr. Reiblich has 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



STANDARD 
NGINEERING CO, 

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Engineers and Contractors 

FEderal 7-1343 

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WASHINGTON 7, D.C. 









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served as Professor of Law at the Uni- 
versity 1930-44. reappointed in 1949, 
and continuing to date. He graduated 
with honors from Catonsville High 
School in 1921. His academic degrees 
are: Bachelor of Arts, cum Iaude, The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1925; J. D. 
degree in Law, New York University, 
1929; LL.M degree, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1937. He is a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa and Phi Delta Phi, hon- 
orary legal fraternity. 

LT. OBSTLER RECEIVES MEDAL 

First Lieutenant Edward E. Obstler, a 
law school graduate and a native of 
Baltimore, was presented with a Com- 
mendation Ribbon with Medal Pendant 
by Brigadier General Robert H. 
McCaw. The award was made for 
outstanding service while serving as 
Assistant to the Chief, Texas City 
Claims Branch. Lt. Obstler is now on 
duty in the Claims Division, Office of 
the Advocate General at Fort Holabird, 
Maryland. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



DR. THUSS APPOINTED 

Dr. William G. Thuss, Jr., '48, has 
recently been appointed the first Associ- 
ate Professor of Industrial Medicine in 
the Department of Preventive Medicine 
and Public Health, University of Ala- 
bama Medical College. A native of 
Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Thuss re- 
ceived the doctor of science degree in 
industrial medicine from the University 
of Cincinnati in 1956. He is also Medi- 
cal Director of Hayes Aircraft Corpo- 
ration in Birmingham and is in practice 
with the Thuss Clinic also of that city. 

DR. BERGER SPEAKS TO ASSOCIATION 

Dr. Herbert Berger, '32, President of 
the Blood Bank Association of New 
York State, addressed the California 
Blood Bank System of the California 
Medical Association in San Francisco 
on February 23, 1957. Dr. Berger 
spoke on "The Role of State Medical 
Associations in Blood Banking." 

DR. BERBLINGER OPENS OFFICE 

Dr. Klaus W. Bcrblinger of the Depart- 
ment of Psychiatry has announced the 
opening of his office for the practice of 
psychiatry at the Psychiatric Institute, 




NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

638 FREDERICK STREET 
Hagerstown, Maryland 



CLASS 1947 



Kauffman Manufacturing & 
Supply Company 



Founders, Machinists and 
Industrial Supplies 

New and Used Machine Tool 
Equipment — Wood and Metal 



PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 




Dietrich & Vyambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



University Hospital, Baltimore. 

Dr. Raymond H. Kaufman. '48, has 
announced the opening of his office for 
the practice of obstetrics and gynecol- 
ogy in Houston, Texas 

DOUGLASS RECEIVES DEGREE 

The degree of master of science in 
internal medicine was recently awarded 
to Dr. Robert C. Douglass. '52. by 
Wayne University College of Medicine 
in Detroit. Dr. Douglass has his office 
in Detroit and also serves as Instructor 
in Internal Medicine at Wayne Uni- 
versity College of Medicine. 

DR. SIMMONS IN FLORIDA 

Recently returned from duty in the 
U. S. Air Force, Dr. Frederick R. Sim- 
mons, '50, has entered the practice of 
pediatrics in Daytona Beach, Florida. 

DR. BERESTON NAMED CONSULTANT 

Dr. Eugene S. Bereston, '37, has been 
named consultant for the 1957 edition 
of New and Non-official Remedies pub- 
lished by the Council on Pharmacy and 
Chemistry of the American Medical 
Association. 

DR. EVERETT AT ABBOTT 

Dr. Guy M. Everett was named Group 
Leader in Pharmacology at Abbott 
Laboratories, it was announced by 
Elmer B. Vliet, Vice President and 
Scientific Administrator of the Pharma- 
ceutical company. 

Dr. Everett received a Ph.D. in 
physiology from the University Medical 
School where he was a Weaver Fellow 
in physiology. His undergraduate work 
was done at the University of Iowa. 

A senior research pharmacologist at 
Abbott since 1943, Dr. Everett's work 
has been concerned with the study of 
anticonvulsant drugs and tranquilizers. 

CAPT. SMITH COMPLETES COURSE 

Capt. George T. Smith, '52, and Med. 
'56, recently was graduated from the 
military medical orientation course at 
the Army Medical Service School, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. The course, 
designed for newly commissioned offi- 
cers, stressed medical service in com- 
bat. 

MATTHEWS PROMOTED 

Henry S. Matthews, who studied at the 
Medical School for three years has been 
promoted to the position of District 
Manager of the Memphis Sales District 
for the CIBA Pharmaceutical Products, 
Inc. Mr. Matthews was formerly a 
hospital-research associate in Washing- 
ton, D. C. for the New Jersey company. 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



Massers Motel 8c Restaurant 

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TEL 



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Frederick, Maryland 



DANZER 
METAL WORKS 

COMPANY 

SHEET METAL 
SPECIALISTS 

Hagerstown, Md. 

PHONE RE 3-8181 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 
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FEEDS 

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FREDERICK 



( Feed MO 3-3113 

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Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
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Arcticaire, Inc. 

Frozen Food Lockers 

Processing Meats, Fruits and 

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RALPH A. BAIERL 

Reg. Representative 

10 N. JONATHAN STREET 

Hagerstown, Md. Phone RE 3-4341 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 


Distributors 


Shell Petroleum Products 


Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 


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55 




9 



ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 



1915 M STREET, N.W. 
AND FIFTH & MORSE STS., N.E. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



MILLER and 
LONG CO., Inc. 

Concrete Construction 



5506 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington 15, D. C. 



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OPTICIAN 

Over 30 Years Experience 

| Dispensing and Manufacturing 

Modern Eye Wear 

Complete Optical Laboratory 
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Thomas E. Carroll 
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modern 
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MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St.. N.W. 

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THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 
SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 13. MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



56 



GRADUATES FROM ORIENTATION COURSE 

Capt. John R. Gauld, Med. '55, recently 
was graduated from the military medi- 
cal orientation course at the Army Med- 
ical Service School, Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas. The course, designed for newly 
commissioned officers, stressed medical 
service in combat. Capt. Gauld has 
received orders assigning him to Walter 
Reed Army Medical Center, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

FACULTY TO MARK 150TH ANNIVERSARY 

Dr. William S. Stone, Dean, has re- 
cently announced plans for a Faculty 
Convocation to be held on Wednesday, 
December 18. in honor of the 150th 
anniversary of the granting of the 
charter to the School of Medicine. 

This auspicious occasion will be 
marked by appropriate exercises and 
current plans are that they will take 
place in historic Chemical Hall and will 
serve to rededicate the principles and 
ideals of the school in the same envi- 
ronment in which they were created a 
century and a half ago. 

BULLETIN TO BE PUBLISHED SIX TIMES 
A YEAR 

Following a recent meeting of the Edi- 
torial Board of the Bulletin of the 
School of Medicine it was announced 
through the office of the Dean that the 
School of Medicine will publish a con- 
densation of the activities of the various 
departments of the School of Medicine 
during the previous year. This annual 
report will be published as an addi- 
tional number of the Bulletin of the 
School of Medicine and will be included 
in the annual subscription price without 
additional cost. It is expected that the 
"annual report number" will constitute 
a newly added December number, to 
appear some time shortly after Christ- 
mas. The index for the year will ap- 
pear also as a part of the annual report 
number. Scientific articles and school 
news will not be carried in this edition. 

NEW DEPARTMENT ORGANIZED 

Dr. Gladys Wadsworth, formerly of the 
Department of Anatomy, has been 
named head of the newly organized 
Department of Physical Therapy. 
Housed in temporary quarters on the 
fourth floor of the Gray Laboratory, 
Dr. Wadsworth began the first course in 
physical therapy with a class of four 
students. With renovations of the old 
laboratory and classroom spaces nearly 
complete, the Department now begins 
its second year of increasing activity 
and service to the School of Medicine. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



NKWS 111 MS 

Extensive alterations are being made 
in the Brcssler Researeh Laboratory to 
provide additional laboratory space and 
animal quarters for research. New lab- 
oratories for surgical research and 
enzymology have been constructed on 
the sixth floor for the Department of 
Surgery under the supervision oi Dr. 
Robert W. Buxton. Professor of 
Surgery. 

For the departments of Medicine and 
Microbiology, extensive revisions have 
been made on the fifth floor to provide 
enlarged quarters for the section of 
Infectious Diseases. Eight sterile cubi- 
cles, a tissue culture laboratory, en- 
larged animal quarters for small in- 
fected animals, monkey quarters, and a 
ramp connecting the Brcssler Labora- 
tory with animal quarters on the top 
floor of the Gray Laboratory have been 
built. 

Other new laboratories on the fifth 
floor are the laboratories of the Section 
on Pulmonary Diseases. Dr. William S. 
Spicer, Director, and the Section of 
Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, 
Dr. Thomas Connor, Director, both of 
the Department of Medicine. 

The Rh laboratories have been re- 
built and provided with new quarters 
on the fifth floor of the Bressler Build- 
ing. 

An unrestricted grant of $5,000 from 
Wyeth, Incorporated, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, has been awarded to Dr. 
Theodore E. Woodward, Professor of 
Medicine and Head of the Department 
for research in infectious diseases. Dr. 
Eugene Blank has been appointed a 
Wyeth Fellow in Medicine from Janu- 
ary 1 to June 30, 1958 under this 
grant. 

The lecture room on the second floor 
of the Bressler Laboratory was com- 
pletely air-conditioned and sound 
proofed during the summer. 



DR. KUMP HEADS MEDICAL SOCIETY 

Dr. Albert B. Kump, class of 1938, 
and an outstanding Bridgeton, New 
Jersey physician and surgeon, was re- 
cently installed as president of the 
Medical Society of the State of New 
Jersey. 

A native of Bridgeton, Dr. Kump is 
a second generation member of one of 
the State's most prominent medical 
families. His mother, the late Dr. Reba 
Lloyd, was beloved and respected by 
all who knew her and won high esteem 
in medical circles when women were 
first entering the field. 

Dr. Kump graduated from the 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 



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Bridgeton High School and the Blair 
Academy He later entered Johns 
Hopkins University receiving his Bach- 
elor of Science degree in 1933. After 
his graduation from the School of 
Medicine in 1938 he served an intern- 
ship at the Cooper Hospital in Camden, 
New Jersey and then entered practice in 
Bridgeton. He is a member of the 
Bridgeton Hospital Surgical Staff and 
has been Chief of Obstetrics there since 
1946. 

Dr. Kump has been a pioneer and 
leader in industrial medicine, serving 
as plant physician for the Owens- 
Illinois Glass Company's Bridgeton 
plant since 1940. He is also active in 
numerous professional and lay organ- 
izations being Past President of the 
Cumberland County Medical Society 
and has served as chairman of the Sub- 
Committee on Medical Practice of the 
Medical Society of New Jersey. 

As a tribute for his humanitarian 
service to the people of Bridgeton he 
was awarded first honorable mention in 
the 1957 American Legion Citizenship 
Award program — one of the highest 
honors an individual can receive. 

CARIBBEAN CRUISE REPORT 

The response to the Medical Seminar 
Cruise to the Caribbean has been most 
gratifying to date and those wishing to 



C. Engel's Sons 

Incorporated 
Established 1850 

Fruits and Vegetables 

District 7-0995 

350 D STREET, S.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



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GRAIN 
FEED 

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Phone TA 2-3000 



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go who have not yet made reservations 
should delay no longer. The American 
Academy of General Practice will allow 
15 hours of Category I Credit to those 
attending the lectures. 

The Stockholm — a 525 foot passen- 
ger liner, the largest ever constructed 
at a Swedish Yard — will sail from 
Wilmington, North Carolina on Novem- 
ber 30th, arriving at Havana on De- 
cember 2 and Nassau on December 4; 
returning to Wilmington on December 
6. 

Among the recreational facilities 
aboard the Stockholm will be outdoor 
and indoor swimming pools, deck ten- 
nis, trap shooting, bridge tournaments, 
a concert orchestra, a library and a 
gymnasium. 

Conducting the cruising classrooms 
will be University of Maryland School 
of Medicine faculty members, Dr. R. 
Adams Cowly, Associate Professor of 
thoracic surgery; Dr. Martin Helrich, 
Professor of Anesthesiology; Dr. John 
Young, Professor of Urology and head 
of the Division of Urology; Dr. Leonard 
Scherlis, Associate Professor of Medi- 
cine; and Dr. Melchijah Spragins, As- 
sociate in Pediatrics. 



College of 

MILITARY SCIENCE 



KEMP PREPARES FOR NEW FIELD 

Lt. Colonel Robert M. Kemp, '55, re- 
cently retired from the U. S. Army. 
He enlisted at the age of 18 in 1937 
and during his 20 years service he held 
a variety of assignments at posts in 
many areas of the United States as 
well as in the Far East and Europe. 
He is presently writing his thesis for an 
M.A. at George Washington University. 
He will move to the San Francisco Bay 
area soon where he plans to take more 
graduate work for a doctorate in busi- 
ness administration prior to entering 
business. 

CLAUNCH PROMOTED FULL COLONEL 

Thomas H. Claunch, Sr., '54, has been 
promoted from lieutenant colonel to 
colonel. Col. Claunch received his 
commission in 1935 through the Re- 
serve Officers Training Corps program 
at the University. He entered active 
service in January, 1941, and attended 
the U. S. Army Infantry School's basic 
officers course at Fort Benning. The 
49-year-old soldier served as district 
transportation officer in the European 



58' 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Theater during World War II, continu- 
ing in that capacity through January, 
1946. He assumed his present duties at 
Fort Benning, Georgia in September, 
1956. 

GRADUATES 

Capt. George A. Millener, Jr., '50, re- 
cently was graduated from the 31 -week 
officer advanced course at The Infantry 
School, Fort Benning, Georgia. Captain 
Millener was instructed in the duties 
and responsibilities of a field grade 
officer. A holder of the Silver Star and 
the Purple Heart, he entered the Army 
in July, 1950. 

SWORN IN AS CAPTAIN 

Ellis F. Anderson, '56, was sworn in as 
■ a Captain in the Regular Army recently 
! by Colonel David L. Edwards, Wash- 
ington Military District chief of staff, 
in Washington. D. C. Anderson will 
continue to serve as a Reserve major on 
active duty status. 

COL. HART IN JAPAN 

Lieutenant Colonel Clarence Hart, '56, 
was recently assigned as Chief of the 
Supply Branch, Maintenance and Sup- 
ply Division, Ordnance Office, U. S. 
Army Japan at Camp Zama, 35 miles 
southwest of Tokyo. 

Colonel Hart entered the Army in 
June 1941 and served in Alaska with 
the 53rd Infantry Regiment and the 
309th Ordnance Battalion until his dis- 
charge in February 1946. From No- 
vember 1948, when he re-entered the 
Army, until 1951 he served with the 
Mission to Argentina. Subsequent as- 
signments included duty with the Office 
of the Chief of Ordnance, Washington, 
D. C, and the Birmingham Ordnance 
District, Alabama. 

After his arrival in the Far East in 
January, 1957 he served with the 1st 
Cavalry Division in Japan and Korea 
until his present assignment. 



School of 

NURSING 



Bessie M. Arnurius 
Helen E. King 



DR. CARL SERVES ON COUNCIL 

Dr. Mary Carl was recently elected to 
serve on the Executive Committee of 
the Southern Regional Council on 
Mental Health Training and Research. 
The Council was established in 1954 
as part of the program of the Southern 
Regional Education Board. Its purpose 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 




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CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 
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59 



SUNBEAM 
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is to aid states in training more person- 
nel for mental health programs and 
increasing research in mental health and 
illness. 

MAJOR TRAVERS TRANSFERRED 

Major Estelle M. Travers, '39, trans- 
ferred from Korea to Fort Belvoir, Vir- 
ginia. Commissioned in 1939, Major 
Travers is on temporary assignment in 
the Office of the Surgeon General of 
the Army to assist in a study looking 
toward modernization of the Army 
nurse's field clothing. Other assignments 
have included Iceland and the Pacific 
Theatre of Operations. While in 
Korea she was advisor to Lt. Col. Kim 
Eun Soon, Chief Army Nurse Corps, 
Republic of Korea. 

NURSES PROMOTED 

Verna J. Ritzmann, Mary L. Thompson, 
and Jean E. Weller, '54, were recently 
promoted to the rank of 1st Lieutenant 
in the Air Force Nurse Corps. They 
are currently serving in the 3700th 
USAF Hospital, Lackland Air Force 
Base, Texas. 

TAKE NEW POSITIONS 

Flora Hickman who was until very 
recently a part time nurse on the 10th 
floor of the University Hospital has now 
accepted a full time position as Indus- 
trial Nurse for Koester's Bakery. 

Mrs. Fred McCrumb has accepted a 
position in the operating room at the 
University Hospital on a part time basis. 

Mrs. Vera Martin, recently employed 
on the ninth floor of the University 
Hospital, has accepted a part time job 
with Stewart's Department Store, as an 
Industrial Nurse. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



60 



Dr. John Autian 
Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



BURGEE PROMOTED 

Sydney L. Burgee. Jr., '55, was recently 
promoted to specialist third class at 
Fort Richardson, Alaska, where he is 
assigned to the Army Dispensary. 

Specialist Burgee, a pharmacist at the 
dispensary, entered the Army in Janu- 
ary 1955 and completed basic training 
at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. 

ANNUAL ALUMNI FROLIC 

The Eleventh Annual Frolic of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy was held at the Alcazar, 
Baltimore. November 7. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



The frolic is provided by the Alumni 
Association early in the first semester 
of the school year for entertainment of 
the students and also to provide for the 
participation of fraternities, sorority, 
clubs and other groups of the school 
in competitive entertaining skits, for 
which prizes are awarded. 

H. Nelson Warfield is President of 
the Alumni Association, and the com- 
mittees and groups assisting were: 
Program Committee 
George Stiffman, Chairman 
Solomon Weiner, Co-Chairman 
Entertainment Committee 
James P. Cragg, Jr., Chairman, with 
Frank J. Slama in charge of the prepa- 
ration of the skits provided by the 
students 
Place and Arrangement Committee 
Samuel A. Goldstein, Chairman 
Publicity Committee 
Jerome Stiffman, Chairman 
Charles Spigelmire, Co-Chairman 
Ticket Committee 
Solomon Wiener, Chairman 
Irving Cohen, Co-Chairman 
Mr. Samuel Portney, First Vice-Presi- 
dent, is general Chairman of all the 
Committees that function for the An- 
nual Frolic. 

ALUMNI AID ORIENTATION EXERCISES 

The Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy provided a luncheon for 
entering students and members of the 
faculty during orientation exercises, 
September 16. 

The following pharmacists partici- 
pated in the orientation exercises: H. 
Nelson Warfield, President, and Samuel 
Portney, First Vice-President of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy; George Schmidt, President, 
and Joseph Cohen, Executive Secretary 
of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Associ- 
ation; Victor H. Morgenroth, President 
of the Baltimore Retail Druggists' As- 
sociation; Stephen J. Provenza. Chair- 
man of the Committee on Professional 
Relations; and Francis S. Balassone, 
Chief of the Division of Drug Control 
of the State Board of Health and also 
Secretary of the Maryland Board of 
Pharmacy. 

ALUMNI MATCH FOUNDATION GRANTS 

The American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education, organized in 1942, 
and financed by gifts from manufac- 
turers and friends in pharmacy, pro- 
vides grants for graduate fellowships 
and teaching fellowships in pharmacy. 
The Foundation also provides a grant 
of $400.00 annually to a school of 
(Continued on next page) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER. 1957 




Tennis Courts 

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THE =^^^=^=^= 

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Just eight miles from Washington, 
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Phone WArfield 7-8324 
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Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

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pharmacy for undergraduate scholar- 
ships for qualified junior and senior 
students, providing the school provides 
a matching amount of $400.00 for such 
scholarships. 

For several years the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the School of Pharmacy has 
donated the matching $400.00 for these 
scholarships to the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland. For 
the first semester of 1957-58 $100.00 
has been awarded to Jessie Lois Tracey, 
Box 200, Route 2, Reisterstown, and 
$100.00 to Larry H. Pozanek, 4003 
Coldspring Lane, Baltimore, with the 
understanding that an additional $100- 
.00 will be awarded to each of these 
students for the second semester if a 
superior record during the first semester 
is maintained. 

Two full scholarships, valued at 
$500.00 each in the School of Phar- 
macy have been provided by the 
Alumni Association for the session of 
1957-58. The recipients were: Lois 
Lee, Route 5, Cumberland, Maryland, 
and Aaron Kadish, 292 S. Spring Court, 
Baltimore 13, Maryland. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



DR. S. H. WINTERBERG 

Dr. Samuel H. Winterberg, associate 
soil chemist with the University of 
Tennessee Experiment Station, died 
June 1 1 of a heart attack. A native of 
Maryland, Dr. Winterberg graduated 
from the University of Maryland in 
1928 and received his doctor's degree 
at Rutgers. Dr. Winterberg had been 
with the University of Tennessee since 
1936, working primarily on evaluation 
of phosphate fertilizers and the avail- 
ability of phosphates. He was widely 
known in this field of research. 

NURSES 

Dorothy Maye Pearson Stoner, '44, 
passed away February 26, 1957, from 
a sudden illness incurred while on vaca- 
tion with her husband at Lake Tahoe, 
California. 

Jennie Barber, '07, died January 31, 
1957. 

Mrs. S. Frederick Pfohl (Rose Haas), 
'94, died February 10, 1957. 

Zora Tillett, '20, died March 29, 
1957. 

Mrs. Charles W. Mitchell (Florence 
Crowe), '97, died on July 1, 1957. 

DR. HARRY LIPKIN 

Dr. Harry Lipkin, a 1914 graduate of 



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62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



the School of Medicine recently passed 
away. 

A. D. COCKEY 
Alexander D. Cockey, a 1907 graduate 
of the College of Engineering, died 
recently at his home in Mount Wash- 
ington, Maryland. Burial was in Druid 
Ridge Cemetery. Mr. Cockey was a 
nationally known figure in the field of 
contract bonds, and he was at one time 
referred to as the "dean" of contract 
underwriters in America. He was em- 
ployed by the Maryland Casualty Com- 
pany from 1911 until his retirement in 
1953. 

JOSEPH THOMAS SCHNEIDER 

Joseph Thomas Schneider, Ag. '53, 
died in an auto accident on April 5, 
1957 in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. 

GEORGE H. RIGGS 

Dr. George Henry Riggs, Med. '91, 
succumbed March 10 after an illness of 
several months. A native of Ijamsville 
in Frederick County, it was there that 
he founded Maryland's third oldest 
institution for nervous and mental 
diseases in 1896. He sold it in 1939 
and continued in private practice until 
1950, never taking a vacation until his 
retirement after the age of 80. 

In addition to the successful manage- 
ment of his sanitarium and the accom- 
panying and ensuing private practice, 
Dr. Riggs was on the executive staff 
of the Frederick (City) Memorial Hos- 
pital and lectured in the Nurses Train- 
ing School for more than a quarter of 
a century. He was a former member 
of the Tri-State Medical Society of 
Maryland, Virginia and the District of 
Columbia, and the Clinical Society of 
Maryland. He was a life member of the 
American Medical Association, a Fel- 
low and Life Member of the Maryland 
Psychiatric Society, Fellow Emeritus of 
the Maryland Psychiatric Association, 
Life Member and Fellow of the Ameri- 
can Psychiatric Association, Life Mem- 
ber of the Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion, Past President of the Frederick 
County Medical Society, of which he 
was a Life Member, and held Life 
Membership in the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. 

FRANK G. STEWART 

Frank Gregory Stewart, Engineering 
'12, died of a heart attack at his home 
in Washington, D. C. on September 10, 
1957. He was associated with the auto- 
mobile business here from its earliest 
days, being a founder and first presi- 
dent of the Automobile Old Timers. 
Mr. Stewart was president of the Stand- 
ard Automobile Supply Co., Inc., an 



organization which he sel up in the 
early 1920s. He was a member i>l 
George Washington Posl ol the Amen 

can legion, the Washington Hoard ol 

Trade, and the Republican Club, as 
well as All Souls Memorial Episcopal 
Church. I his year he was serving as 
chairman of the automotive division of 

the United Clivers I unci. 

DR. oils l WVR1 \( l QUI] I. EN 
Dr. Otis Lawrence Quillen ol Saint 
Mary's, West Virginia, died at his home 
on April 30. 1957 following a short 
illness. 

A native of l.etart Falls, Ohio and a 
member of the class of 1912, he began 
private practice in Belleville, West Vir- 
ginia and later moved to Jacksonburg, 
West Virginia and Belpre, Ohio before 
settling in Saint Mary's in 1932. 

Dr. Quillen was a member of the 
American Medical Association, the 
West Virginia Medical Association and 
the Parkersburg Academy of Medicine. 
He was appointed superintendent of the 
West Virginia Training School in May, 
1942 serving until April, 1944. For a 
time he had been county health officer 
and served in many civic organizations. 

DR. WILLIAM WILEY CHASE 

Dr. William Wiley Chase, class of 1927, 
and resident of Washington, D. C, died 
at Garfield Hospital on May 16, 1957. 
Dr. Chase had recently been nominated 
Chairman of the Department of Surgery 
at the new Washington Hospital Center. 
A trained general surgeon, he had been 
particularly interested in surgery of the 
stomach and large intestine. 

A native of Baltimore and a graduate 
of Western Maryland College, he be- 
came a member of the resident staff of 
Garfield Hospital following his gradua- 
tion from the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. From 1942 to 
1946 he served in the Army Air Force 
Medical Service and was chief of the 
surgical service in hospitals in Denver, 
Colorado and Omaha, Nebraska. In 
1955 the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Science was conferred upon him by his 
alma mater. Western Maryland Col- 
lege of which he was a member of the 
Board of Governors. 

DR. R. EDWARD GARRETT 

Dr. R. Edward Garrett, class of 1890 
and former superintendent of the Spring 
Grove State Psychiatric Hospital in 
Maryland, died on June 14. 1957. He 
was 89 years old. 

A graduate of the Baltimore City 
College, Dr. Garrett served as resident 
physician for 5 years in the psycho- 
pathic division of the Bay View Hos- 



pital ( now Baltimore ( it) Hospil 
after ins graduation from medical 
school IK- then served brief!) >s an 
\ssisi.mt Resident in surgerj .>i the 

lohns Hopkins Hospital ami latei .is As- 
sistant Physician .it the Spring Grove 
Hospital beginning in 1889. He served 
as supei intendenl from 1928 until I 



SOCIAL NOTES 



I \(,U,I MINI 

Mrs. W. C. Gourley of Sewickley, 

Pennsylvania, announces the engage- 
ment of her daughter Nancy Ann, a 
1956 graduate of the College of Home 
Economics, to Mr. Alfred James 
Wharton who is now serving with the 
United States Navy. Mr. Wharton is 
stationed at Bainbridge, Maryland. 

MARRIAGES 

Miss Eva Altmann and Rabbi Herbert 
Birnbaum were married August 12 in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Rabbi Birn- 
baum is a graduate of Johns Hopkins 
University, received an M.A. degree 
from Georgetown University, and is 
now working for a doctorate at the 
University of Maryland. 

Miss Julia Antrim and Mr. John H. 
Snyder were married September 18, 
1956. Both are graduates of the Uni- 
versity. Mr. Snyder is employed by 
Western Electric Company, Baltimore. 

Mr. Richard Crompton, a 1953 grad- 
uate of the College of Engineering, was 
married to Joan Anderson August 31. 
Mr. Crompton was recently appointed 
Assistant Project Engineer with Bendix 
Radio Division, Bendix Aviation Cor- 
poration, Baltimore. 

Jane Alice Boynton, formerly of the 
school of Nursing, left August 29 to 
drive to Denver, Colorado. From there 
she will fly to San Francisco to be mar- 
ried in Berkeley to Dr. Robert W. Day. 
Dr. Day is a native of Framingham, 
Massachusetts. 

Patricia Ann Killingsworth. H.Ec. 
'56, and Thomas M. Lescalleet, Jr., 
B.P.A. '56. were married on June 13 
at St. Jerome's Church in Hyattsville. 
They are residing in Tokyo. Japan. 

BIRTH 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Walter. 1952 grad- 
uates of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, take pleasure in announcing that 
on August 21 a son, Harold Mark 
Walter, was born to them. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1957 



63 



Abby Murcury. Inc 48 

Acme lion Works 62 

Advertisers Engraving Co 32 

Alcazar 35 

AUo Cafe 42 

Alliance Plumbing .V Heating Co 48 

American Disinfectant Co 62 

American Office Equipment Co., Inc 29 

Anchor Masonry Co 30 

Anchor Post Products (Anchor Fence) 24 

C. J. Anderson 41 

A rental re. Inc 55 

Arnold's Village Shop 50 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 38 

I (■ \ i wood & Co., Inc 44 

Akin L. Aubinoe Outside Back Cover 

Avignone Freres 24 



Baltimore Asphalt Block & Tile Co 32 

Baltimore Check Room Service 57 

Baltimore Envelope Co 56 

Baltimore-Washington Express Co 46 

Bank ol ( risfield 59 

Bank of Maryland 25 

Barber & Ross Hardware, Inc 36 

Bard-Avon School 47 

The Barn 29 

Bartlett Real Estate 59 

Jeanette Beck, Inc 40 

C. J. Benson Furniture Co 35 

Bergmann's Laundry 52 

Henry O. Berman Co., Inc 38 

Harry A. Boswell Co 31 

F. S. Bowen Electric Co 44 

Brentwood Inn 54 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 51 

Briggs Meat Product Co 62 

Brooks-Price Co 50 

Dexter E. Bryan 48 

Buck Glass Co 22 

Buell's Auto Service 24 

M. S. Buttner Sons. Inc 34 



Canova Bros., Inc 30 

Carey Machinery & Supply Co 56 

Thos. E. Carroll & Son 56 

Caton Ridge Nursing Home 57 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 39 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 31 

Cohn & Bock Co 59 

Cokesbury Book Store 42 

Collegiate Publishing Co 47 

Colson Merriam Co 29 

Wm. Cook Funeral Home 47 

A. Myron Cowell, Inc 61 

Crosse & Blackwell Co 28 

Crout, Snyder & Crandall 46 

Crown Oil & Wax Co 55 

Crusty Pie Company 60 

Cullen Photo Co 62 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 54 



Jack Daniels Buick, Inc 36 

Danny's Formal Wear 39 

Danzer Metal Works Co 55 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 47 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters, Inc 57 

Del-Haven White House Cottages 45 

I. II. DeVeau & Son, Inc 37 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc 54 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 34 

Drummond & Co.. Inc 46 



Norman S. Earley & Son 54 

Electronic Wholesalers, Inc 44 

El Mexico Restaurant 53 

Embassy Camera Center 62 

C. Engel's Sons 58 



Fabricator's Steel Corp 60 

Farmer's Cooperative Assn 55 

J. H. Filbert, Inc 32 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 51 

First National Bank ol Baltimore 23 

Franklin Uniform Co 38 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn 33 

Frederick Underwriters. Inc 55 

Fuller & d'Albert. Inc 24 



Garamond Press 46 

S. A. Gatti & Son. Inc 31 

Henry B. Gilpin Co 22 

Albert F. Goetzc Packing Co 43 

Goodbody & Co 55 

Ciray Concrete Pipe Co 38 

Gusli's Restaurant 56 



Directory of Advertisers 



Hammond Bros., Inc 29 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 46 

Hanncs Formal Wear 49 

Harrington Hotel 60 

Havelock & Selenkow 39 

llcdin House Hotel 25 

Hendlcr's Ice Cream 39 

Heppner Engineering Co., Inc 48 

Hillyard Sales Co 48 

Robert F. HofT 37 

C. Hoffberger Co 47 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

Huffer-Shinn Optical Co 45 

George Hyman Construction Co 45 



Eddie Jacobs 43 

Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co., Inc 29 

Johannes & Murray 57 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 27 

Frank B. Jones 56 



Kaufman Mfg. & Supply Co 54 

N. E. Kefauver, Jr 53 

James D. Kemper 52 

Kenmar Steel Construction Co 49 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 53 

King Bros., Inc. Printing 33 

Earle Kirkley, Inc 40 

W. H. Kirkwood & Son 28 

Kloman Instrument Co 26 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 22 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 33 

Kramer Hardware & Supply 36 



L & S Construction Co., Inc 31 

Lamar & Wallace 45 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince Georges Co., 

Inc 48 

Maurice Leeser Co 34 

Liberty Radio & Television Service 47 

Loewy Drug Co., Inc 32 

Lord Calvert Hotel 61 

Loveless Electric Co 30 

Lustine Nicholson Chevrolet 27 



M & G Armature & Generator Service Inc... 34 

Mangels, Herold Co., Inc 46 

Maria's Restaurant 22 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 43 

Mason Canning Co 59 

Masser's Motel & Restaurant 55 

Meadow Gold Ice Cream Co 26 

James A. Messer Co Inside Back Cover 

Metropolitan Poultry Co 57 

Metropolitan Tourist Co 39 

Harry S. MicKey Electric Co 47 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assn 28 

Miller & Long Co 56 

Miller Brothers 40 

Mischanlon's Restaurant 40 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc 32 

Modern Machinist Co 56 

Modern Stationery Co 35 

Morrison & Bready, Inc 60 

Murray Hardware Co 37 

Myers & Quigg, Inc 61 



John J. & F. Rowland McGinity 33 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 37 

McNeill Surveys, Inc 48 



National Bank of Cambridge 58 

National Equipment & Supply Co 60 

J. Nichols. Produce 56 

Norman Motor Co 61 

North Washington Press, Inc 49 



Old Dutch Tile Co 44 

Oles Envelope Corp 39 

Olney Inn 24 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc 41 



W. K. Pace Co 44 

Palmer Ford, Inc 37 

Park Transfer Co 26 

Peabody Conservatory of Music 26 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors, Inc 57 

People's Supply Co 52 

Pimlico Hotel 28 

Place Vendome ( Restaurant ) 52 

Poor, Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy, Inc 35 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 45 



Quick Service Laundry 27 



Refrigeration Supply Co 36 

Restorff Motors 53 

Rex Engraving Co 49 

Rice's Bakery 38 

Rivers & Bryan, Inc 52 

Katherine Robb Nursing Home 46 

Rocco's Charcoal House 51 

Roma Restaurant 43 

Rose Exterminator Co 47 

T. Edgie Russell 55 



Salisbury Milling Co 58 

Savile Book Shop 61 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 35 

Schofield Co.. Inc 41 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) 35 

Schmidt's Baking Co., Inc 54 

Charles Schneider Baking Co 60 

Schulmerich Carillons, Inc Inside Front Cover 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 30 

Sellers Sales & Service 52 

Shoreham Hotel 27 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 36 

Singer Sewing Center 37 

John W. Singer Uniform Co 22 

Russell W. Smith, Insurance 39 

Southcomb, Inc 50 

Southeastern Floor Co 61 

Southern Farms (Aunt Lucy Hams) 42 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 58 

Standard Art, Marble & Tile Co 49 

Standard Engineering Co 53 

Star Baking Co 58 

C. H. Stark Electric Co 38 

Wm. P. Stein, Inc 40 

Steuart Petroleum Co 30 

George H. Stieber Co.. Inc 42 

Stone House Inn 45 

William F. Stone. Jr 35 

Sturdee Metal Products Co 39 

Suburban Trust Co 53 

Mano Swartz 41 

Sweetheart Bakers 59 



The Trailer Village 23 

Thomas & Thompson Co 28 

Thomas Distributing Co 55 

Thomsson Steel Co 52 

William J. Tickner & Sons. Inc 33 

Tilghman Packing Co 59 

Tool & Supply Co., Inc 54 

Towson Telephone Secretaries 38 

Trailways 25 



Wallop & Son, Insurance S3 

Warner's 50 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works 31 

Washington Stair & Ornamental Iron Works 62 

Washington Woodworking Co.. Inc 62 

J. 1 Wells Co.. Inc 59 

Westchester Dining Room 41 

Western Exterminating Co.. Inc 62 

Perry O. Wilkinson 36 

Carl J. Williams & Sons 59 

J. McKenny Willis 58 

W. R. Winslow Co 24 

Wolf Cohn 42 

Wonder Silk Store 41 

Wye Plantation 59 



Ycnching Palace 42 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




visit our complete modern showroom 

. . . for modern plumbing and heating supplies. 
We offer the finest selection, best quality . . . 

• Plumbing & heating supplies 

• pipes • valves 

• fittings 

plumbing and heating specifications 
available for architects, builders. 

JAMES A. MESSER CO. 



OFFICE AND SHOWROOM 

1206 K Street, N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 

WAREHOUSES 

4th and Channing Streets, N.E. 

1206-8 K Street, N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



BRANCH 
8216 Georgia Avenue 
Silver Spring, Maryland 

BRANCH 

102 West 25th Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 




WASHINGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 





HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Meeting and Banquet Facilities 



DUPONT CIRCLE 
Alvin L. Aubinoe, Pres. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



ALVIN -L: AUBINOE Inc 



Build 



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1515 19th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone: 
HUdson 3-6025 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Volume XXIX • Number 2 
January-February • 1958 



Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 




In This Issue: Upper Atmosphere Group Fires Rockets 
New Journalism Building Dedicated 
Placement Service in a Buyer's Mark] i 




She helps people find the products and services they want. Mrs. Vonna Lou Shelton. telephone representative 
in Minneapolis. Minn., checks the advertisements that business men have placed in the classified directory. 



PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANSEL ADAMS 



This telephone girl is a big help to businesses 



When you think of a telephone wo- 
man you probably think of the opera- 
tor. But there are many other women 
at the telephone company who do 
important jobs for you. And they, 
too, have the "Voice with a Smile." 

For example, Vonna Lou Shelton 
handles a very necessary service in 
the business man's world. She is one 
of many women throughout the coun- 
try who help different concerns plan 
and place their advertising in. tele- 
phone directory Yellow Pages. 

Friendliness, good judgment, and 
follow-through have won for Mrs. 
Shelton the confidence of business 
men who appreciate quick, competent 
service and painstaking efficiency. 



Vonna Lou's life is filled with peo- 
ple. Among her principal off-the-job 
interests are her husband and Sun- 
day School class. 

She's a program chairman of a 
missionary society. Sparks many a 
fund-raising campaign. Goes to col- 
lege to study piano and takes lessons 
to improve her golf. 

Like so many folks in the tele- 
phone company. Mrs. Shelton has 
made a lot of friends — on her own, 
and on the job. 

"I don't know of any other work," 
she says, "that would bring me so 
close to all my neighbors. Our cus- 
tomers get to think of us as their per- 
sonal representatives. I like that a lot." 



She has a loyal following in the "younger 
set." Mrs. Shelton has a way ivith the 
children of the neighborhood which in- 
spires a faithful attendance at her class 
in Sunday School. 




YEUOW PAGES 



^ 



Working together to bring people fogether ... BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM ML 






Maryland 




cover: 

By the time this issue goes to press most <>) the furnishings, equipment and 
hooks will have been moved into the University's new Mam 1 ihnu \ building 
at College Park. The March-April issue of Maryi \m> will five readers a photo 
tour of the new facility. This exceptionally fine photograph was taken aiiii 
December's snow storm by Mrs. I. ore Grossman, photographer <<•> the l ni- 
versity's Photo Laboratory. 



the 



Maryland 



JANUARY FEBRUARY • 1958 



magazine 



Volume XXIX 



Number 2 



Alumni Publication of 
the University of Maryland 

B OARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

JOSEPH H. DECKMAN, '31, President 
FRANK BLOCK. '24, Vice-President 
MISS FLORA STREETT, "38, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 



ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM. Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. WHEELER, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 

OFFICE_OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

i HO 7-9018i I EM 3-2553 



In This Issue — 



FEATURES 

2 
4 
8 
I 1 
12 
15 
17 
18 
20 



NEWS FROM THE COLLEGES 



64 



Alumni Diary 

Campus Notes 

Upper Atmosphere Group Fires Rockets 

Homecoming Festivities Keep Alumni Stepping 

New Journalism Building Dedicated 

Placement Service Serves Students. Alumni in a Buyer's Market 

Launching a College — No. 3 in History Series 

Foreign Students Give Campus International Flavor 

University Sports 

News From the Clubs 



24 


Agriculture 


26 


Arts and Sciences 


32 


Business and Public Administration 


33 


Dentistry 


39 


Education 


42 


Engineering 


46 


College of Home Economics 


47 - 


Law 


49 


Medicine 


52 


Military Science 


52 


Nursing 


52 


Pharmacy 


54 


Physical Education 


56 


Social Notes 


58 


Completed Careers 



Directory of Advertisers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



I hi General Alumni Council: 

(School and College Representatives) 

ACtlCll I L K I 

Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
Arthur B. Hamilton, '29 
Clayton Reynolds, '22 

\KIS & SCIISilv 

W. Gilbert Dent. Jr.. '26 
Charles Ellinger, '37 
Ralph G. Shure, '32 

MiSS A P U B 1 I ( ADMINISTRATION 

Harry A. Boswell. Jr., '42 
Alvin S. Klein. '37 
Egbert F. Tingley. '27 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene D. Lyon, '38 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, '22 



EDUCA I ION 



Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 
William B. Prigg, '53 

ENGINEERING 

Joseph H. Deckman, '31 
Charles R. Hayleck, '43 
Howard L. Keller, '43 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Miss Irene Knox, '34 

LAW 

Leon H. A. Pierson, '23 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 

M EDICAL 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

N URSING 

Mrs. Mary France Dennis, '47 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Miss Flora M. Streett, '38 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat. '37 



Ex-Officio Members of the 
Council: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, 18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 

Baltimore — Samuel Silber, '34 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland— Dr. J. Russell Cook, '23 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

Richard E. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '39 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher, '37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin-James W. Stevens, '19 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

They are few in number, for the most part unknown to each other, but possessing 
the common denominators of foresight, dedication and faith. Such were the men 
of vision who in their separate paths established the foundations and laid the 
cornerstones upon which grew the ivy of educational history and progress leading 
to a great combine of individual facilities, diversfied minds, and separate schools. 
The birth of the University of Maryland was not an easy one. In some instances 
unity was hard to come by, adequate nourishment failed to reach some of the 
members, and some fractures healed slowly. The doctors were patient, understand- 
ing and wise. Carefully nurtured under firm hands the infant of 1920 has come 
of age as an institution respected around the world for the products it has pro- 
duced, the research results obtained, and the service it has rendered. Such is the 
University of Maryland of 1958. 

An Alumni Association, similar in many ways to the early University itself, 
stands upon a threshold. Alumni of divergent professional interest, separate aca- 
demic backgrounds and often unrelated experiences have discovered a common 
goal. Backed by a University-supported Office of Alumni Affairs. Office of Uni- 
versity Relations, and an Office for Endowment and Development, the Alumni 
Association looks ahead to many unified and productive years. Across the years 
and across the country, graduates join in the pride of complete accreditation, ac- 
complishment in research, athletic success, plant development, faculty achieve- 
ment, and the reflected credit of fellow alumni who have climbed the competitive 
ladder to fame. 

Recent highlights have been the launching of a Greater University of Maryland 
Fund, headed by a Past President of the Alumni Association; strong and success- 
ful programs by alumni clubs in Baltimore, Cumberland and New York: develop- 
ment of a long-range policy program in which the University and the Association 
are full fledged partners; and the almost certain realization of increased alumni 
memberships, more scholarships, more alumni clubs, and a Student Union building 
for the Baltimore campus in the not too distant future. 

The goal ahead is an even greater University with full appreciation of two 
points — the State of Maryland has provided at least 40% of the financial need to- 
ward the average graduate's education, and on the average a college degree is 
worth $100,000 more in lifetime earning power than only a high school diploma. 
Repayment is anticipated in the form of increased alumni participation to assist 
the total University in her forward momentum and to assure an ever increasing 
number of young people the same opportunity we as alumni have enjoyed. To- 
gether we go forward! 

As ever, 



ffr* — . 




David L. Brigham 

Director of Alumni Relation*. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




If you want to know what the college crisis 

I means to you, send for the free booklet, "The 

Closing College Door," to: Box 36, Times 

Square Station, New York 36, New York. 



Perhaps it's 
later than I 
you think! I 

Your son. His eager young mind is on football now. 
But soon, in high school, he'll be grappling with 
Science, and English and History. Then, almost be- 
fore you know it, you and he will be trying to decide 
on where he'll go to college. 

Will you be too late? 

At this very moment our colleges and universities 
are facing a crisis. Despite all their efforts to meet 
the challenge of growing pressure for applications, 
they are hampered by lack of funds. That pressure 
will continue and increase. The number of boys and 
girls who want to go to college — and will be qualified 
to go to college — is expected to double in 10 years. 

Meanwhile the needed expansion is far more than a 
matter of adding classrooms, laboratories and dor- 
mitory space. There must be a corresponding in- 
crease in faculty strength. The profession of college 
teaching must attract and hold more first-rate minds. 

This problem vitally affects not only students and 
their parents but business and industry as well. 
There is a pressing need for scientists — for teachers 
and civic leaders — for business administrators and 
home-makers — who have learned to think well and 
choose wisely. They are and will continue to be the 
backbone of our strength as a nation. 

Freedom needs educated people. In this country, 
those who lead are those who know. Help the colleges 
or universities of your choice — now! 



Sponsored as a public service, in cooperation with the Council for Financial Aid to Education 




-/\- HIGHER EDUCATION 




KEEP IT BRIGHT 



ANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 




CAMPUS NOTES 



"MISS EDITH FROTHINGHAM RETIRES 
AFTER 36 YEARS OF UNIVERSITY SERVICE 

Miss Edith M. Frothingham, affection- 
ately known to many faculty, staff, and 
students as "Miss Edith," recently re- 
tired after 36 years service to the Uni- 
versity. From October 1, 1921, until 
her retirement, Miss Frothingham 
worked as a secretary, bookkeeper, and 
for many years as Administrative As- 
sistant to the Director of Finance and 
Business. At various times she handled 
all personnel records, maintained finan- 
cial records of intercollegiate athletics, 
and maintained student activities funds. 

Born in Laurel, Miss Frothingham 
graduated from Laurel High School in 
1907. Following her graduation from 
business school a year later, she went 
to work in Washington, D. C, as a 
secretary and bookkeeper, working in 
this capacity for several firms in Wash- 
ington and Laurel until 1921. 

Miss Frothingham lives with her 
three sisters at 327 Prince George St., 
Laurel. Miss Alma Frothingham is 
Administrative Assistant to the Dean 
of the College of Education at the 
University and Mrs. Claudia Frank is 
employed by the Business Office. The 
third sister, Miss Alice Frothingham 
recently retired from long federal 
service. 



PLUMMER NAMED DIRECTOR OF 
PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY 

Clayton R. Plummer, Purchasing Agent 
and Supervisor of Stores at the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee, Knoxville, for the 
past 1 1 years, has been appointed Di- 
rector of Procurement and Supply for 
the University. 



Plummer succeeds George W. War- 
ren who was recently appointed Direc- 
tor of Purchasing of Baltimore City. 

A native of Laconia, New Hamp- 
shire, Mr. Plummer was educated in 
New Hampshire public schools. 

He holds a B.S. degree in architecture 
from the University of New Hampshire 
and a Master's degree in education 
from Springfield College. Springfield 
(Mass.). 

Before entering the purchasing field. 
Plummer was an Assistant Professor on 
the staff of the University of Tennessee 
Department of Mechanical Engineering. 

He is a Past President of the Pur- 
chasing Agents Association of East 
Tennessee, an affiliate of the National 
Association of Purchasing Agents. He 
has also served as a regional chairman 
of the National Association of Educa- 
tional Buyers. 

Plummer is married and has three 
children. 

BUST OF GLENN L. MARTIN 
IS DEDICATED 

A bust of the late Glenn L. Martin was 
presented to the University by The 
Martin Company, October 14 at the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

The bust was sculptured by Marcello 
Storelli, of Baltimore, and will be dis- 
played permanently in the rotunda of 
the Mathematics Building. 

Dr. Elkins accepted the gift on be- 
half of the University from William 
B. Bergen, Executive Vice President of 
the aircraft company. 

The Glenn L. Martin Institute of 
Technology is made up of eight build- 
ings and houses the entire College of 




Engineering together with many of the 
academic and research departments of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Formal dedication of the Institute 
took place in March. 1955. although 
construction had been carried on pre- 
viously over a period of six years. 

Guests attending the ceremony in- 
cluded The Martin Company officials, 
and University administrative officers, 
deans, department heads, faculty and 
students. 

In his address accepting the bust for 
the College of Engineering, Dr. Fred- 
eric T. Mavis, Dean, outlined outstand- 
ing events in Mr. Martin's career and 
remarked: 

"Many of us here (and I am one) 
did not know Mr. Martin when he was 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



alive. Yet everyone who sets foot on 
this campus can see his influence; every- 
one who looks skyward can share his 
aim. He was a pioneer in aviation, an 
air ace, a builder of aircraft, a benefac- 
tor of mankind. 

"Mr. Marcello Storelli, the sculptor, 
has wrought in the strong bust that we 
unveil today, something more than the 
work of his skilled hands. He has given 
us a fresh opportunity to look to our 
horizons which, in one way or another. 
are highlighted by the spirit of Glenn 
L. Martin." 

Representing the Martin Company 
were: 

William B. Bergen, Executive Vice 
President; Daniel W. Siemon. Vice 
President-Industrial Editor; Albert L. 
Varrieur, Vice President and General 
Manager; Herman Pusin. Director- 
Baltimore Engineering Division; John 
Hollyday, Director of Personnel; John 
H. Pond, Manager-Education; Ray Wil- 
burn. Executive Development Adminis- 
tration; Joseph M. Rowland, Corporate 
Director, Information Service; Clar- 
ence W. Miles, General Counsel; and 
Marcello Storelli, Sculptor. 

Representing the University were: 

Mr. Charles P. McCormick, Chair- 
man, Board of Regents; Mr. Harry H. 
Nuttle, Board of Regents; Dr. Thomas 
B. Symons, Board of Regents; Dr. Wil- 
son H. Elkins, President of the Univer- 
sity; Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Assistant to the 
President; Mr. Alvin E. Cormeny, Assist- 
ant to the President for Endowment and 
Development; Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, 
Dean of the Faculty; Dr. Ronald Barn- 
ford, Dean of the Graduate School: 
Dr. Frederic T. Mavis, Dean of the 
College of Engineering; Dr. Leon P. 
Smith, Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences; Mr. Robert J. McCartney. 
Director, Office of University Relations; 
Prof. Russell B. Allen. Acting Head of 
Civil Engineering; Prof. John L. Bryan, 
Head of Fire Protection Curriculum; 
Prof. George F. Corcoran, Chairman 
of Electrical Engineering; Dr. Nathan 
L. Drake, Head of the Chemistry De- 
partment; Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Chair- 
man of Chemical Engineering; Dr. 
Stanley B. Jackson, Head of the Math- 
ematics Department; Prof. A. W. Sher- 
wood, Acting Head of Aeronautical 
Engineering; Dr. John S. Toll, Head of 
the Physics Department; Dr. John E. 
Younger, Chairman of Mechanical 
Engineering; Mr. Robert C. Byrus, Di- 
rector of Fire Service Extension; Mr. 
Donald S. Gross, Director of Wind 
Tunnel; Dr. Monroe H. Martin, Di- 
rector of Fluid Dynamics Institute; Mr. 
J. D. Ramer, Librarian, Engineering 
and Physical Sciences Library. 




A recent acquisition of the library, .scarce, hack issues of the Music Supervisors Journal, 
is here being examined by Mrs. Isabella Hayes, Librarian; Professor Homer Ulrich. 
Head of the Department; and Professor Rose Marie Grentzer of the Department of Music. 



SPEECH THERAPY RECORDER 
DUBBED "SPEAKNIK" 

A new type of tape recorder for use 
in speech therapy has been developed 
by the University's speech and hearing 
science division. 

The new recorder "talks" to the pa- 
tient, giving him a planned lesson which 
he may practice over and over again 
on the same machine. 

Dubbed "Speaknik" by the speech 
science research staff, the recorder be- 
comes the patient's "satellite" repeating 
speech signals that guide the patient in 
recording his own voice without neces- 
sary supervision by a speech therapist. 

When a patient has finished record- 
ing, he may play the tape back and 
listen to his own speech signal and com- 
pare it to the original given through the 
machine. Without erasing the thera- 
pist's lesson, the student may erase his 
practice and begin again. 

Dr. Hendricks, director of the project 
reports that, "an additional 50 percent 
of practice time can be provided 
through use of this machine in the 
treatment of speech disorders of articu- 
lation, voice, and aphasia, resulting 
from brain damage. 

Dr. Hendricks stated that although the 
dual channel recording principle in- 
volved in this tape recorder is not new 
"the application of this principle to 
speech and hearing therapy has not yet 
been fully realized. Principle innova- 
tions bv the research team have been 



simplification of recording controls so 
that the machine can be used by un- 
trained personnel, and the preparation 
of lesson plans for all kinds of pa- 
tients." 

Willing guinea pigs in the research 
project have been foreign students at- 
tending the University who have made 
use of the machine in correcting their 
foreign accent. 

Development of the tape recorder 
was made possible by a grant of 
$15,000 to the University by the De- 
partment of Health, Education and 
Welfare in June of this year. 

FLUORIDATION EFFECT ON BALTIMORE 
CHILDREN UNDER STUDY 

The first study of the effectiveness, eco- 
nomic value and benefit to children 
resulting from the fluoridation of Bal- 
timore drinking water has entered its 
second phase at the School of Den- 
tistry. 

Since 1952, when the fluoridation 
process was first used in the city, re- 
searchers, under the direction of Dr. 
Donald E. Shay. Professor of Micro- 
biology, have examined more than 500 
children between the ages of five and 
twelve for the extent of caries, or decay 
in the teeth of each child. 

"This particular group of children 
was chosen because it is at this age that 
caries involvement usually begins. Ad- 
ditionally, this group had not had the 
advantage of drinking fluoridated water 
(Continued on next pai;e) 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



Campus Notes 

Continued froiti page 5 



since birth/' Dr. Shay said. 

He pointed out. "The information 
gained from these examinations forms 
the basis for a comparison with phase 
two of the problem." 

The second part of the investigation 
involves the examination of more than 
500 additional children between the 
ages of five and twelve. 

Goals of the two-phase research 
problem include a tabulation of the 
teeth prone to decay, the incident of 
decay involvement in these particular 
teeth and also the frequency of location 
of decay. 

"In carrying out our research goals. 
we shall be able to place fluoridation 
value on a dollars and cents basis," he 
declared. 

Taxpayers of Baltimore city have 
been paying approximately $75,000 a 
year, or 10<* per capita, since 1952, for 
the fluoridation process, according to the 
Council on Dental Health of the Mary- 
land State Dental Association. 

FOURTEEN PHARMACY STUDENTS 
AWARDED SCHOLARSHIPS 

Fourteen students at the University's 
School of Pharmacy are the recent re- 
cipients of scholarships. 

The Read's Drug Stores' Foundation. 
Inc., has awarded scholarships to six 
School of Pharmacy students. Origi- 
nated in 1944, these scholarships are 
made available to sophomore, junior 
or senior students with superior scho- 
lastic averages and financial need. 
Three of the six students receiving 
awards arc sophomores. They are Al- 
bert H. Warfield, Morton D. Richman, 
and Martin C. Shargel, all of Baltimore. 
Two juniors, Melvin Chaiet and Sorell 
L. Schwartz, both of Baltimore, also 
received Read Scholarships. The sixth 
scholarship was awarded to Senior Class 
President Jay R. Brinsfield, of Rhodes- 
dale, Md. 

The University Alumni Association 
has awarded a scholarship to Murray 
C. Spear, a junior from Baltimore. Two 
scholarships were given by the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy 
to Jessie L. Tracey, a sophomore from 
Rcistcrstown and Larry H. Pozanck, a 
junior from Baltimore. Originated in 
1954 by the School of Pharmacy 
Alumni Association, the scholarships 
are available to sophomores, juniors, 
or seniors with outstanding scholarship 
and a financial need. 

The American Foundation for Phar- 



maceutical Education has awarded 
scholarships to Baltimore students 
Harry Bass and Marvin Saiontz. They 
received the scholarships on the basis 
of their superior "B" academic average. 

Ronald Goldner of Baltimore has 
been awarded a scholarship to the 
School of Pharmacy by the Carroll 
Chemical Company. Originated in 
1956, the scholarship is granted to a 
sophomore with a superior academic 
average during his freshman year and 
a financial need. 

The Noxzema Foundation has 
awarded scholarships to two Baltimore 
students. The recipients are William 
Theodore dinger and Michael B. 
Rodell. Originated in 1952, the Nox- 
zema Foundation scholarships are 
awarded to undergraduates on the basis 
of educational qualifications. 



;itr 




Miss Anna Urban (left) is shown as she 
presents a gift to Miss Kate White marking 
Miss White's 40th Anniversary as Assist- 
ant Librarian at the University Library. 

PHI BETA KAPPA ASSOCIATION 
AWARDS SCHOLARSHIP 

John W. Dorsey. Jr.. of Sharpsburg. has 
been awarded a scholarship sponsored 
by the Phi Beta Kappa Association of 
the University. 

Mr. Dorsey, a senior, majoring in 
Economics, has been active in many 
campus activities and is currently serv- 
ing as President of the Men's League. 
He is also a member of the Student Life 
Committee, Secretary of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, men's honorary fraternity, and 
has a seat on the Executive Council of 
the Student Government Association. 
In addition, Mr. Dorsey is a pledge of 
Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 

The scholarship, which Mr. Dorsey 
received, is offered by Phi Beta Kappa 



members officially connected with the 
University of Maryland. It is awarded 
to that student who. at the end of his 
junior year, has attained the highest 
cumulative scholastic average and 
whose basic course program has been 
in liberal studies. Awarded this year 
for the first time, the scholarship car- 
ries a grant of $250. 

The award presentation is a part of 
the Phi Beta Kappa Association's efforts 
to bring a chapter of the leading scho- 
lastic honorary to the University of 
Maryland campus. 

APPLICATIONS OPEN FOR 
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA FELLOWSHIP 

The National Council of Alpha Lambda 
Delta will award the Alice Crocker 
Lloyd Fellowship for graduate study 
for use during the 1958-1959 academic 
year. Any member of Alpha Lambda 
Delta graduating in 1956, 1957 or 1958 
who has maintained the scholastic aver- 
age (3.5) throughout her college career 
is eligible. About 40 girls from the 
University are eligible to receive this 
fellowship. They will be in competi- 
tion with members of Alpha Lambda 
Delta from the 79 chapters throughout 
the nation. 

The applicants will be judged on ( 1 ) 
scholastic record, (2) recommendations 
submitted. (3) the soundness of the ap- 
plicant's project and purpose, and (4) 
to some extent on need. Interested 
Alpha Lambda Delta members who are 
eligible for this award should discuss 
the matter of applying for the fellow- 
ship with Miss Julia Billings, Assistant 
Dean of Women and advisor to the 
Alpha Lambda Delta chapter at the 
University. Application blanks and in- 
formation sheets may be obtained from 
the Dean of Women's office or directly 
from the National Fellowship Chair- 
man. 

Six years ago. in 1951. Marilyn 
Langford, a graduate of the University 
won the Alice Crocker Lloyd Fellow- 
ship. 

phs grants to university 
total $255,867 

A report issued by the National Insti- 
tutes of Health listing research grants 
has revealed that the University was 
awarded a total of $255,867 by the 
Public Health Service during the 
months of July and August, 1957. 

The School of Medicine received 
$146,070 for studies in the area of 
pediatrics, medicine, neurology, phar- 
macology, neurophysiology, bio-chemis- 
try, obstetrics and gynecology, physiol- 
ogy, surgery and anatomy. 

(Continued on page 23) 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Explanation of Fund Operation Received Enthusiastically 



Explanation of the operation and man- 
agement of the Greater University of 
Maryland Fund received enthusiastic 
acceptance by the Fund's Board o! 
Governors at their first organizational 
meeting held December 10 at the 
Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel, Baltimore. 

A demonstration outline of the func- 
tions and responsibilities of the Fund's 
volunteer officers was presented to the 
Board and four soon-to-be mailed pro- 
motional publications and an organiza- 
tional handbook were distributed for 
their inspection and discussion. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, Chairman 
of the Fund, expressed his personal 
gratification for the interest displayed 
by the members of the Board and by 
University personnel who have accepted 
key responsibility in this year's pro- 
gram. Dr. Goldstein reviewed the 
background organization of the Fund 
and re-stated its four major objectives 
and the importance of each to the 
University: 

support the project for furnishing 
the planned Baltimore Student- 
Faculty-Alumni Center; 
sponsor the inauguration of schol- 
arships to attract the better stu- 
dents to the University; 
purchase special collections for 
the completed Main Library on 
the College Park campus; 
maintain a Heritage Fund to pre- 
serve University traditions in a 
changing era. 

Dr. Elkins told the large assemblage 
that the Greater University of Mary- 
land Fund will play a vital role in the 
continuing growth of the University. He 
stressed the need for additional private 
funds to supplement monies received 
from the State Legislature and from the 
various income sources of the Univer- 
sity. Dr. Elkins said the University is 
actively encouraging the growth of a 
strong faculty, providing the installation 
of first-class library facilities and setting 
higher academic goals for its students. 

Intelligent guidance and sound finan- 
cial support are essential to the Univer- 
sity's continued development of quality 
and stature. Dr. Elkins added. "The 
Greater University of Maryland Fund," 
he concluded, "is not just another fund 
raising effort. Rather it is part of a 
broad program to make the University 
greater than ever. I am very gratified 
at the enthusiastic response of outstand- 
ing alumni who have volunteered to 
serve in this fund." 




Views of the banquet preceding the first organizational meeting of the Hoard of Gov- 
ernors for the Greater University of Maryland Fund, held December 10 at Baltimore's 
Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel. 




Organizational meeting of the Operating Committee. Greater I niversity of Maryland 
Fund held in the office of the Assistant to the President for Endowment and Develop- 
ment, College Park November 2 3. Left to right seated around the table: William K 
Press, S. Chester Ward. R. C. O'Connor. Grunie Hobbs, Dr. John Kraut:. Dr. Albert I 
Goldstein, Samuel R. McFarlane, Paul Mullinix, Virginia Conley, Mrs. Mildred Jones, 
John Heise and William H. Evans. In the background /'roc ceding from Dr. Goldstein's 
left: David L. Rrigham. Director of Alumni Relations: John Gywn, Director of the 
Alumni Fund: and A. E. Cormeny. Assistant to the President in ilia me of Endowment 
cuhI Development. 



Dr. Goldstein introduced to the 
members of the Board, Mr. A. E. 
Cormeny, Assistant to the President for 
Endowment and Development. Mr. 
Cormeny outlined the organizational 
structure and operating procedure oi 
the Fund. He particularly emphasized 
the vital roles which will be played by 



regional managers and district repre- 
sentatives. 

Dr. John Krantz, Vice Chairman oi 
the Fund in charge of Special Gifts, 
summarized the objectives of the Fund 
and its importance in increasing the 
stature of the University 

(Continued on page' 24) 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 




EDITORS NOTE 

The following account reports high altitude rocket experi- 
ments conducted by the University of Maryland, Upper 
Atmosphere Group, aboard the U.S.S. Launcher off the 
Virginia Capes. It is written by Professor S. F. Singer, 
Department of Physics and is reproduced here because it 
presents in a lucid and imaginative manner information 
indicative of the vital work being carried on by the 

University in this area. 

The University's newest rocket, the Oriole, is a one and a 

half stage, solid propellant rocket. It was conceived 

by Dr. Singer and designed by Richard T. Bettinger, 

graduate research assistant. Feasibility calculations 

were performed by Jyri Kork, graduate research assistant 

and construction was by F. Smith and H. Kriegsmann. 

Col. Louis J. Poudre is administrative assistant to 

Dr. Singer for all government research projects. 

responsible for logistics and administration. 

The Oriole, carrying a payload of one-half pound has an 

altitude of 500,000 feet. Its total weight is 22 pounds. 

The Oriole and a modified Terrapin will be used for the 

University of Maryland Antarctic Experiments 

planned for 1958-59. 



PHOTOGRAPHS BY E. HULL, AMERICAN AVIATION PUBLISHING CO. 



Upper Atmosphere Group Fires 
Oriole and Terrapin Rockets In Shipboard Tests 



SUMMARY 

This operation is the first part of a proposed Antarctic rocket 
program and was designed to test out shipboard operations, 
as well as new rockets and new experiments. The rockets 
fired were three Terrapins and three Orioles. They are small. 
low cost but reach high altitudes. For example, the Oriole 
rocket, designed and built at the University of Maryland, 
weighs only about 20 pounds, is finless, can reach 100 miles. 

The experiments were designed to produce artificial meteors 
with shaped charges; to investigate chemical reactions of 
nitric oxide; and to study temperatures and winds in the iono- 
sphere with nitric oxide and sodium vapor. 

All rocket firings were successful. Experiments were par- 
tially successful and are being analyzed. 



LAUNCHING OPERATIONS 

During the past few days we have completed an operation 
for firing very small high altitude rockets, some newly de- 
signed, from shipboard in order to learn new results about 
the properties of the outer atmosphere. This operation also 
acts as a sea trial for future rocket launchings from Navy 
ships to be conducted next year in the Antarctic. 

There are three purposes involved in the operation: 1 ) to 
test out the feasibility of firing small rockets from ships; 
2) to test out the new rockets as to their altitude capability 
and successful firing; and 3) to try out some new experi- 
ments for the upper atmosphere. 

Because of bad weather we have had to break off opera- 
tions after only one night of firing, October 29. but resumed 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




GraduaU Assistant 
Mellaril I . Bellinger 
illustrates the 
proportional tit < of 

the Oriole rot ket. 



Adjusting the firing 

mechanism for the Oriole 

launcher. The laum hei 

originally built for tinny 

the Terrapin rocket was 

adapted for use by 

the Oriole. 




again November 4-5. During one night we tired five addi- 
tional rockets — two were Terrapins and three Orioles. 

We can give an enthusiastic affirmative answer to question 
number one, namely that the feasibility of firing these rockets 
from shipboard has been proved to our complete satisfaction. 
The firings were coordinated by the Commander of Destroyer 
Squadron 6, Commodore G. G. Palmer and the men and offi- 
cers of his flagship U.S.S. Cone, destroyer, but were con- 
ducted from our launching ship appropriately named the 
U.S.S. Launcher YV-2 a converted LSM under commanding 
officer Lt. C. R. Derrickson and his officers and men. 

The operations were carried out under very difficult bound- 
ary conditions. They had to be done in twilight or at night 
with completely clear sky conditions so that optical observa- 
tions of the rocket and of the experiments at high altitudes 
was possible from the ground. In addition it was necessary 
! for the firing area to be clear of ships so as to reduce the 
danger of damage of an impacting rocket from its already 
minute value to practically zero. The U.S.S. Cone ran inter- 
ference and requested passing ships to divert their course 
slightly during the firing operation. But since twilight lasts 
for about 30 minutes, it can be seen that it takes a combina- 
tion of happy circumstances of clear skies, no ships in the 
area and relatively calm seas to effect a firing. 

We found that the ship's company was extremely alert and 
interested in the experiments; they acted as optical observers 
and helped in many other ways, for example, in the installa- 
tion of the rocket launcher on the deck and in preparing the 
rockets for firing, assembling of fins, etc. On the whole, the 
rocket operation also acted to boost the morale of the ship's 
company and the whole relationship was a very pleasant one, 
for all concerned. 

Some positive results were obtained as follows: 

We feel that we can prepare on an average of 20 rockets a 
day for firing with about three men. The handling efficiency 



is such that rockets can be fired as close together as five nun 
Utes using the same launcher. And finally, a rocket can be 
loaded on the launcher and tired on command in something 
like 10 to 20 seconds. This fact is important tor catching 
such rare unpredictable events as solar Hares which must be 
observed with rockets flying above the ionosphere. 

The shipboard operations with our small rockets can be 
considered to have been proved successful. All rockets func- 
tioned as expected. The preparation time was very short and 
comparable to land operations. In some respects shipboard 
operations were found to be easier since competent technical 
assistance was available at all times. We found, for example, 
that the set-up time to fire one Terrapin was 20 minutes, the 
set-up time for an Oriole about five minutes, i.e., that the\ 
could be fired at very close intervals and at short notice. For 
example, in one night's operation we fired five rockets — two 
Terrapins and three Orioles — and could have fired consider- 
ably more if rockets had been available. 

DIFFICULTIES ENCOUNTERED 
Some disadvantages were discovered and these may have 
influenced adversely the scientific results of the operation. In 
the first place only three days notice was given for com- 
mencing the operation. We received word on Wednesday 
evening to report aboard ship on the following Monday morn- 
ing. In the meantime we had to prepare payloads and, in the 
case of the Oriole, some rocket components, and we had to 
plan and set up ground stations at two places along the 
coast. As a result, some of the preparation of payloads was 
handicapped. Another adverse factor was ship traffic in the 
Norfolk area. We missed many opportunities for making 
firings due to ships in the vicinity of the launch ship. It is 
expected, however, that the range safety problem will not 



Setting up one of the two optical ground stations; this one located near 
the top of Cape Charles, Virginia. Left to right: Fred Hiss. Labora- 
tory technician; Dr. and Mrs. Hans Griem; Gilbert Bentley. labora- 
tory technician and Robert Wentworth, graduate research assistant. 



Dr. Singer and Dick Hettinger assem- 
ble the last stage of an Oriole rocket. 
Note plastic foam cube to protect tip 
of rocket against damage before bring. 





exist for operations far away from the coast but unfortu- 
nately under the terms set up for this particular operation, it 
was not possible to go beyond about 20 miles from the coast. 

Another adverse factor was weather. Since the optical ob- 
servations had to be done with very clear sky, we had to 
interrupt our operation after only one night out and resume 
operations again the following week. Even then the weather 
was poor with intermittent haziness and partial cloud cover. 
Also the moon had come up and affected our ability to ob- 
serve faint light emissions. 

Nevertheless, in view of the urgency of getting our rockets 
tested in for shipboard firings, we decided to sacrifice some 
of the scientific results in order to complete our operation 
within the shortest feasible time. 

ROCKET PERFORMANCE 

Two types of rockets were fired: The Oriole Rocket and 
the Terrapin High Altitude Research Rocket. 

The Terrapins, which were designed and built by Republic 
Aviation Corporation for the Upper Atmosphere Research 
Program at the University of Maryland, are designed for this 
operation to carry artificial meteor experiments and chemical 
bombs which are ejected into space at an altitude of over 
400,000 feet and photographed from ground monitoring sta- 
tions. Important data about the composition of the high 
atmosphere and such physical conditions of space such as 
temperature, winds and turbulence are expected to be ob- 
tained from these firings. 

The first Terrapin rocket was fired on October 29; its per- 
formance just from ground observation lived up to all expec- 
tations and its altitude is estimated to be over 400,000 feet. 
This particular rocket carried shaped charges and a bottle of 
high pressure nitric-oxide gas. While the shaped charges were 
not observed to go off, the high pressure bottle was exploded 
successfully at the highest altitude and produced a faint 
whitish glow in the night sky. This glow came from chemical 
reactions between the nitric-oxide and atomic oxygen which 
is thought to be present at this high altitude since the sun's 
rays break up the normal oxygen molecules into atoms. 

Two additional Terrapins were fired November 4-5. 

Accompanying the Maryland scientists aboard ship was the 
Project Engineer for the Terrapin rocket. Republic Aviation, 
Mr. Morris Roth. He directed the installation of the rocket 
and the fusing and arming of the explosive circuits. 

The Oriole rocket was test fired for the first time. It is 
a high altitude rocket of completely new basic design. Ita 
cost is minimal and so is its weight, about 25 pounds. This 
vehicle was designed and constructed entirely at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. The indications are that it reached its 
design altitude of over 500,000 feet. 

DISCUSSION OF EXPERIMENTS 
Of the rockets fired, one Terrapin carried a sodium pay- 
load, two Terrapins carried a nitric oxide and shaped charge 
payload, and three Orioles carried a flash bomb. 

All scientific results are based on optical observations. All 
firings must, therefore, be carried out in clear weather and in 
the absence of moon light or other disturbing illumination. 
Two elaborate optical ground stations were set up along the 
Virginia coast, at Wallops Island and near Cape Charles. They 
included special cameras with associated optical filters (inter- 
ference filters), photometer of the photoelectric type, high 
resolution interferometer (Fabyr-Perot) and sodium absorp- 
tion cell. The latter two are very refined optical instruments 
which were used specifically for the sodium experiments. 
The sodium experiments are based on a suggestion by Pro- 



fessor D. R. Bates of Belfast, Ireland and were pioneered by 
the A. F. Cambridge Research Center. In our adaptation we 
use the Terrapin, a two-stage solid propellant rocket, based 
on the Navy Deacon and the Army T-55 rocket. All sodium 
experiments must be done in twilight. The time interval is 
strictly limited, of the order of 25 minutes and corresponds 
to the sun below the horizon but illuminating the interval 
between 10 and 60 miles. The sodium vapor cloud produced 
by our specially designed sodium bomb glows by scattered 
sunlight. From this glow one can determine the temperature 
of the upper atmosphere and from the motion of the cloud 
and its diffusion the winds and turbulence existing in the 
ionosphere. 

The nitric oxide experiments were also pioneered by the 
Air Force. Chemical reactions of the nitric oxide give rise 
to a luminous cloud. This energy is stored in the form of 
dissociated oxygen and represents absorption of solar energy 
during the day. As a result of this stored energy, the nitric 
oxide will emit a glow visible from the ground. We were 
interested in determining the amount of light put out and the 
motion and diffusion of the cloud in order to determine winds. 

The flash bomb firings serve to pin-point the height of the 
rocket by accurate triangulation. 

The artificial meteor experiment is an attempt to produce 
for the first time artificial meteors by means of metallic jets 
from shaped charges. This experiment was suggested by Pro- 
fessor F. Zwicky of C.I.T. This experiment may tell what 
happens when high-speed particles travel through the atmos- 
phere. It should give information on their heating up, va- 
porization and disappearance, as well as other factors of inter- 
est in connection with the upper atmosphere. We must record 
the brightness and velocity of the meteor particles but this 
can be very difficult because of their faintness. Therefore, it 
is especially essential here to supplement the data by visual 
observations, the eye being much more sensitive than film. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 
During the course of the shipboard operation the possi- 
bility was discussed of making additional launchings on the 
same ship, the U.S.S. Launcher, next January or February, in 
the vicinity of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The ship will then be 
operating in conjunction with Operation Springboard, an an- 
nual training exercise, but would be available for these rocket 
firings. This suggestion came from Com Des Ron 6, Capt. 
G. G. Palmer and the ship's captain. Lt. C. R. Derrickson. 
The new captain of the ship, Lt. H. H. Schleuning. Jr., who 
was aboard and who will be taking over command later this 
month also concurred with this suggestion. The advantages 
would be as follows: Practically no ship traffic and therefore 
firing at will, completely clear sky day and night and calm sea 
conditions. 

This should give a possibility of testing out the Oriole 
rocket in more detail, both for optical and for telemetering 
experiments. We will also investigate the possibility of mount- 
ing our cameras to the Mark-25 radar which is used in con- 
nection with the Mark-37 fire control director on the accom- 
panying destroyer. This procedure should give us pictures 
which are only slightly inferior to pictures taken from a 
ground station on land. 

The following facts were ascertained regarding logistics: 
The U.S.S. Launcher will be operating under the Commander 
Caribbean Sea Frontier. The rockets can be loaded aboard 
before departure in early January. The instrumentation party 
from the University of Maryland with instrument heads can 
be flown from Washington to Guantanamo Bay via a Navy 
logistic aircraft, a service which runs every few days. 



10 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






The winner's smile belongs to Miss Peggy Wolfe, this 
year's Homecoming Queen. Riding in state around the 
stadium, she is flanked on the left by Mr. Fred liesley, '92. 
the University's oldest alumni present, and on the right by 
Mr. Clifton E. F idler, '96, Maryland's first football quarter- 
hack. Miss Wolfe is a transfer student from the University 
of Oklahoma, and a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority. 



Homecoming Festivities Keep Alumni Stepping 



Alumni and their families returned 
to the College Park campus October 
26 for a round of Homecoming festi- 
vities which included a golf driving 
contest. Homecoming Chapel Service, 
a luncheon, the Tennessee-Maryland 
football game an after-the-game recep- 
tion in the Student Union and the 
Homecoming Dance. 

One weary but obviously pleased 
alumnus, after completing the full 
schedule of events, said to a fellow 
alumnus, "Each year these Homecom- 
ings seem to involve more things to do 
and events to see. Either I've got to 
speed up or Dave Brigham's got to 
slow down!" 

Although clouded by a 16-0 loss to 
the Volunteers of Tennessee, most 
alumni attended each scheduled event 
starting with the first annual Golf 
Driving Contest staged at the Univer- 
sity's new driving range. For his top 
drive of 259 yards, winner Ray Bellamy, 
Arts and Sciences '55, was presented 



with a trophy. Placing second was 
Del Beman, driving 246 yards; third 
place went to Joseph Deckman, '31, 
President of the Alumni Association, 
driving 226 yards. A second trophy 
was presented to Miss Esther Reid. 
Home Economics '56, for the longest 
drive in competition with coed alumni. 
Her drive measured 179 yards. 

Following the parade of floats spon- 
sored by the various campus organiza- 
tions. Miss Peggy Wolfe was crowned 
this year's Homecoming Queen. Miss 
Wolfe was accompanied in her grand 
tour around the stadium by Fred 
Besley, '92, the oldest alumnus present, 
and by Clifton E. Fuller, '96, Mary- 
land's first football quarterback. Miss 
Wolfe is a transfer student from the 
University of Oklahoma and a member 
of Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority. 

After the game, alumni were guests 
of the University at a reception in the 
Student Union Building. By attending 
were able to miss much of the traffic 



the reception, alumni and their families 
congestion caused by the all-at-once 
departure from the Stadium area of 
some 26,000 fans. 

In the evening, students, faculty and 
alumni Hocked to the Homecoming 
Dance featuring the music of Charlie 
Barnet and the vocal harmonies of the 
Crew Cuts. Attendance was estimated 
at 2.000. At intermission, trophies were 
presented to winners of the float and 
house decoration contests. Based on 
originality of design and the overall 
effect, house decoration winners were: 
Sigma Kappa, first place: Alpha Ep- 
silon Phi, second place; Delta Gamma, 
third place. Sigma Kappa used the 
theme "Maryland Goes to the Orange 
Bowl". 

Float contest winners were: Sigma 
Alpha Mu. first place; Delta Sigma Phi. 
second place; and Alpha Tau Omega, 
third place. The SAM theme was 
"Fifty United States." 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



11 




Principal dedication speaker, 
William D wight. 




New Journalism Building Dedicated 



The university's new $350,000 journalism building 
was dedicated November 23 in the presence of top University 
and State administrative officers and distinguished members 
of the newspaper and public relations professions. 

In the principal address, William Dwight, President of the 
American Newspaper Publishers Association, explained the 
need for better trained and educated newspaper people to 
accurately report news of "bewildering developments that are 
occurring in our lives." 

Speaking at the ceremonies held in the Rotary Room of 
the Dining Hall and presided over by Dr. J. Freeman Pyle, 
Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration, 
were: Dr. Elkins, presenting salutation and welcome; the 
Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin, presenting commenda- 
tion from the State; the Honorable Louis L. Goldstein, Presi- 
dent of the Maryland State Senate, bringing greetings from 
the Senate; the Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, Vice-Chairman 



of the Judiciary Committee, Maryland State House of Dele- 
gates, bringing greetings from the House of Delegates; Mr. 
Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of the Board of Regents, 
bringing greetings from the Board; and Mr. Benjamin L. 
Williams, Manager of the Public Relations Division, Van 
Sant, Dugdale and Co., Inc., presenting commendation from 
the professionals in public relations in the State. 

Two well-known journalists presented commendation from 
the Maryland State Press Association. They were Mr. Oscar 
Morris, President of the Association; and Mr. E. M. Jackson. 
Jr., Chairman of the Association's Journalism Education 
Committee. 

A buffet luncheon was served in an adjacent dining room. 
All persons attending the ceremony were guests of the Uni- 
versity at the Virginia-Maryland game in Byrd Stadium. 
Inclement weather necessitated the transfer of guests in 
buses to Byrd Stadium. 



Rain-soaked special dedication guests and bench warmers watch the Terrapins hatter Virginia. 19-0. 

?5 -^ 






Student editors oj I he 

Diamondback learn page 

make-up techniques in 

the Rock ville plant 

that prints the 
student newspaper. 




A well-equipped laboratory in- 
creases the value and effectiveness 
of instruction in photography. 




Modern editorial offices of The Diamondback. 






Prof. Crowell, Head of the Department of Jour- 
nalism and Public Relations, helps in planning 
the academic goals of each of his students. 



-•^^t 



The front of the new Journalism Building. 





Dr. Carter Bryan instructing students in 
newspaper writing and editing techniques. 



Typical of the Department's many successful graduates is 
Ejner James Johnson (left) shown handing copy to James 
Mullikin, Assistant City Editor of the Baltimore News-Post. 

PHOTOGRAPH BY BALTIMORE NEWS-POS'I \M> SI Mm \MI RIC \N 



After describing the free press' role in reporting and in- 
terpreting news of this heavily scientific age. Governor 
McKeldin concluded his remarks, stating: 

"Here is a building dedicated to the cause of knowledge 
and enlightenment — not only for those who will study here — 
but for the readers of the journals and the listeners to the 
broadcasts prepared by tomorrow's journalists who will have 
learned their professions here. 

"Let us then dedicate this building also to that lasting 
peace for which the whole world yearns, the accomplishment 
of which must come — not from secret documents molding 
in padlocked drawers — but from the exposition of the lie 
and the dissemination of the fact — a prime function of the 
writer and broadcaster of news and comment — common 
today in the lands where freedom reigns — universal, we dare 
to hope in a coming day of dignity for all mankind." 

Mr. Dwight, in his address, said that the dedication was 
"a memorable occasion in the fields of education and jour- 
nalism in the United States and it is happening at a time 
of extraordinary import to all of us. 

"The newspapermen of today — and certainly of tomorrow 
— must have the intellectual equipment to comprehend the 
bewildering developments that are occurring in our lives. 
And this intellectual equipment should be fortressed by a 



Newspapermen are concerned, he said, that many Gov- 
ernmental agencies are withholding information to which the 
public is entitled. 

"The struggle for newspapermen to have full access to 
the news at all levels of government is never ending. The 
desire on the part of too many public officials, both elected 
and appointed, for secrecy presents a continuing challenge 
to newspaper people everywhere in the country. This state 
of the bureaucratic mind is not a creation of the present 
administration or of its immediate predecessors. It has been 
a reality as far back as 1789 when George Washington was 
President of the United States and the Congress passed the 
Housekeeping Act. That Act is still the law of the land. 
It was originally established to set up a cache for public 
records. But it didn't take some people long to discover that 
it could be developed into a handy haven for hiding public 
information." 

Bringing this point close to home, Mr. Dwight cited an 
incident occurring in Lexington Park. 

"Right here in Maryland a few weeks ago, in Lexington 
Park in St. Mary's County, there was an incident that in- 
volved freedom of the press. A weekly newspaper publisher 
was indicted after he published critical opinions on the 
appointment of two property review boards for handling 




broad cultural background, such as only an institution like 
the University of Maryland can provide." 

Mr. Dwight made particular reference to the Russian 
satellite: 

"When Sputnik sheds the heavy political and military 
implications of its existence, it shoots into the blue realm of 
scientific glory, a thrilling tribute to the men, of any nation- 
ality, who have at last broken the chains of earth and found 
a path that heads for the stars. 

"That this generation has found the force to defy gravity 
is a fact so exciting as to overwhelm the motions of fear 
and disappointment stemming from its Russian birth. 

"Should we concentrate on the satellite or on the missile? 
Does Sputnik have a military value that at the moment puts 
us in a weakened position? Have we lost face with other 
peoples of the world? These are some of the questions to 
which a bewildered American public wants the answers. Only 
men and women of intellectual capacity and with a solid 
educational training in liberal arts and the sciences can 
perform the role so necessary, of communicating these facts 
and ideas to the American people. We need men and women 
of professional stature in American journalism. There is a 
great opportunity for people of this calibre — opportunity for 
the material and spiritual satisfactions of life." 



road condemnation cases there. Fortunately the indictment 
was dismissed by a chief judge of the Circuit Court. But 
the implications of this case are frightening. It can happen 
in this county or in any county in the land. Public officials, 
elected or appointed, are servants of the people at all times. 
They are accountable to the people they serve. There is no 
justification for secrecy. Nor have they any right to forbid 
fair comment." 

Mr. Dwight concluded his remarks with the following: 

"Newspapers stand in greater need than ever of trained 
minds to meet the demands of a reading public that is itself 
better educated than ever before, with more time to see the 
country and world and to think about what is going on. 
They must meet an ever-widening public interest, report a 
rapidly expanding variety of public activity, serve a nation 
to whom the world is looking for leadership. 

"This Department of Journalism at the University of 
Maryland with the modern tools that such a fine building 
offers, located close by Washington, can perform distinguished 
service for the American people by training men and women 
to be dedicated newspaper people." 

Mr. Dwight is publisher of the Holyoke (Mass.) Tran- 
script Telegram and the Greenfield (Mass.) Recorder-Gazette. 



14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



For the college graduate of this decade the world in 
which he must make his living is "cold" no longer. In fact, 
it is quite warm and friendly and, for engineering graduates 
and other professional elite the climate is devilishly hot. 

Recruiters from big and small firms range the campus 
December through March listening, cajoling and explaining 
in the counter-part of a national talent search for the better 
student. And the soon-to-graduate student conducts an ag- 
gressive search of his own in an attempt to find the right job 
in which he can "grow," "put his training to best use," "find 
rock-ribbed security." 

In the vortex of this whirlpool of searchers stands the 
steady center of the University's Placement Service — dispens- 
ing detailed job information, patiently counseling, scheduling 
interviews — attempting to place a multitude of right men and 
women in the right jobs. 

The Service is actually a network of departmental faculty 
and student representatives with Mr. Lewis M. Knebel, As- 
sistant Dean of Men at the administration helm as Placement 
Service Director. Each Department Head appoints a faculty 
representative who, in turn, appoints a student representative. 
These volunteer persons receive bulletins and announcements 
regarding placement opportunities and recruiting schedules 
and dispense such information to interested students. Volun- 
teer representatives serve on special committees especially in 
connection with Career Week and, in addition, are charged 
with the responsibility of publicizing the activities of the Place- 
ment Service. 

More than 300 major national companies visit the Univer- 
sity each year seeking college graduates for their training 
programs and for a variety of employment. Such companies 
as du Pont, General Electric, Westinghouse, U. S. Steel, 
Bethlehem Steel, RCA Victor are listed among these. In ad- 
dition, many local companies come to the University: West 
Virginia Pulp and Paper Company of Luke, Maryland, Vitro 
Corporation of Silver Spring, Black and Decker Company of 
Baltimore, and Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory 
of Silver Spring. 

December through March recruiting visits are scheduled as 
industrial talent prospectors range the campus in a search for 
the better student. The Glenn L. Martin technology group 
is the happiest of their hunting grounds. In greatest demand 
(as might be suspected) are engineers — mechanical, electri- 
cal, chemical and civil engineers heading the list. Students 
who will graduate as mechanical engineers are usually signed 
up a year in advance. Next in demand are accountants, 
physicists and chemists. 

And for alumni who remember first job starting salaries of 
$20 a week and less here's the average starting salaries of 
new graduates: engineers, $475 a month; industrial man- 
agement majors, $450 a month; other business majors, $400 a 
month; accountants, $440 a month; agriculture majors, $375 a 
month; and graduates of the liberal arts, $375 a month. 

According to Mr. Knebel, most women graduates of the 
University work for a while after graduation. Most are not 
career-minded, however. Many work to support their hus- 
bands who are seeking higher degrees. The typical Maryland 
co-ed has, as her chief "career objective," marriage and the 
responsibility of home and family. 



Into mis seemingly prosperous scene, \ smali i 

cloud has moved across the horizon I ins year, about a dozen 

companies have cancelled recruiting visits to the campus as a 

result oi a slight recession in areas m which thej operate. Iii 
addition, many of the companies which will have representa 
lives on the campus tins winter have indicated thai the> will 
be hiring less manpower, Professional and .nmcli.ni econo 
mists can decide for themselves whether this would indicate 
a trend toward economic "readjustment" or "recession ." In 
the last three years all but a lew members ol each graduating 
class have been hired within a month ot their graduation 



Placement Service Serves 
Students, Alumni in a 
Buyer's Market 




Mr. Knebel pusses the good word to a brand new job seeker. 



Although the Placement Service is engaged in a number of 
special activities, it operates under four guiding objectives: 

1 ) To advise students on career opportunities and to pro 
vide resource material on jobs available. This particular ob- 
jective is carried out by personal consultation, career forums, 
and/or use of resource materials in the placement library. 
The Director helps students with their problems of career 
selection, field and company selection, job opportunity loca- 
tion, letter writing, and resume preparation. The information 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



15 




Recruiters are anxious to tell 
June graduates of opportunities 
in their companies 



library contains data on individual companies, jobs available, 
and materials on various business and career fields classified 
by location, by type of business or industry, by career, and, 
alphabetically, by company. 

2) The Office acts as a mediary between employers and 
students seeking employment by scheduling on-campus re- 
cruiting interviews and by setting up a register of students 
available for employment and referring jobs to them. Every 
day jobs leads are transmitted to the Placement Office by 
telephone or by personal visit. The leads are sent promptly 
to all qualified people on the register. 

3) Part-time jobs are provided for those students who need 
work experience before graduation. These may be part-time 
jobs during school or full-time summer jobs. A file of avail- 
able part-time and summer jobs is kept in the Placement 
Office at all times. In addition, two summer job forums are 
held, one before and one after Easter. 

Alumni have a special interest in the Placement Service. 
The act of graduation does not remove a graduate from 
placement benefits. Upon request, an alumnus may register 
his name and job objective with the Service thereby assuring 
him of transmittal of job leads as they pertain to his interests 



and as they are received in the Service office. Although most 
leads concern the graduating senior, requests to fill executive 
positions at $10,000 a year and above are received. 



One of the most important functions of the place- 
ment Office is the yearly advent of Career Week, composed of 
special interest forums. These forums are open to sophomores, | 
juniors, and seniors and are of particular value to those who 
have not yet decided upon a definite career. Career Week is 
an attempt to bring to the campus outstanding leaders in 
major areas to describe the present conditions of several in- 
dustries and special advice for the student-soon-to-be-a-job- 
seeker. 

Career Week this year included several interesting speakers 
and discussions. A forum "Opportunities for Graduates in 
Business" presented a panel of speakers to discuss the fields 
of transportation, marketing, personnel, accounting, banking, 
and public relations. A forum for engineering students was 
concerned with the proper way to apply for a job and a sam- 
ple interview was set up. Mr. Jesse Krajovic, College Rela- 
tions Director of The Martin Company directed the dis- 
cussion. As part of the program Mr. Krajovic reviewed 
sample application letters written by a number of students 
and conducted the mock interview. This meeting was open 
to students from the entire University. 

A forum for Home Economics majors featured Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Collins, Instructor, as the moderator for a panel of 
speakers discussing the extension service, research and gradu- 
ate degree work, utilities, fashions, and advertising. 

An "Opportunities in Agricultural Fields" forum considered 
the subjects of research, poultry industries, commercial sell- 
ing, extension, careers in federal employment, and foreign 
service in Agriculture. 

Other forums scheduled included "Opportunities for the 
Liberally Educated Student," "Opportunities in Education," 
and forums concerning the biological sciences, the physical 
sciences, and a forum concerning jobs for college women. 




Miss Flora M. Street. Supervisor of the Obstetrical 
Floor, University Hospital, represents that large num- 
ber of women graduates who have achieved important 
success in their chosen careers. A 1938 graduate of 
the School of Nursing, Miss Street served during 
World War II as a Captain in the U. S. Army Nurse 
Carps She is the new Vice /'resident of the Univer- 
sity's Alumni Association. 




Mrs. Thomas Mont, wife of the Terrapins head football coach, 
is a dedicated mother. She attended the University 1941-43 
and resumed her studies soon after her children readied 
school age. Mrs. Mont is a senior in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, majoring in sociology. Pictured here with their 
mother is Stephen, 10; Jeffrey, 8; and Danny, 7. Mrs. Mont 
represents those women graduates who have assumed the 
career task of maintaining a home and raising a family. 



16 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



The third in a series of arti- 
cles i>\ Mi IV Man detailing 

various aspects ol the I unci 

sity's rich and colorful past. 



Launching A College 

The Establishment of the Maryland Agricultural College 



By 

Frederick S. DeMarr 
Assistant Dean of Men 



Although thk maryi and agriculturai college was 
chartered by the General Assembly in 1856. its doors were 
not opened to receive students until September. 1859. The 
first two years were consumed by the job of selling the neces- 
sary amount of stock in order to comply with the terms of 
the state charter. After this it was necessary for the new 
Board of Trustees to select a faculty and provide facilities 
for the student body. Each of these major tasks contributed 
to the three year delay. 

Perhaps the most pressing problem was that of the facili- 
ties. There was in existence on the new campus ( Ross 
Borough Farm), the old inn building, two frame dwellings, 
a barn and other minor farm buildings. These structures, 
valued at approximately $14,000, would accommodate a por- 
tion of the faculty and the farm laborers, but certainly would 
not provide necessary classroom and dormitory space for 
the students. On August 24, 1858 the cornerstone of the 
first college building was laid. This structure, known as the 
Barracks, cost $5,300. It was five stories in height and con- 
tained 15 classrooms and offices on the first two floors and a 
total of 51 chambers for students on the other three floors. 

The first faculty consisted of four members, viz., George 
C. Shaffer, Professor of Agriculture; H. D. Gough. Professor 
of Mathematics; Batista Lorino, Professor of Languages; and 
Benjamin Hallowell, Professor of Philosophy. Professor Hal- 
lowell was selected as the first President of the Faculty. This 
title was employed until 1867, apparently to better distinguish 
the institution's head from the president of its Board of 
Trustees. 

Born in 1799 near Germantown, Pennsylvania, Professor 
Hallowell came to Olney, Montgomery County. Maryland in 
1819 to teach in a private school. It was here that he met 
a young lady whom he later married in the Sandy Spring 
Meeting House. In 1824 he opened a private school in 
Alexandria. Virginia. While in Alexandria, he founded the 
Alexandria Water Company and the Alexandria Lyceum. 
While conducting his school. Hallowell also served as Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry in the medical department of Columbian 
College, now The George Washington University. 

While in search for members of the new faculty, a trustee 
of the Maryland Agricultural College contacted Professor 
Hallowell and asked his views on what should be the loca- 
tion, objects and aims of the new institution. In the Auto- 
biography of Benjamin Hallowell it is stated 

I had desired for over thirty years to be connected with an 
educational establishment in which the muscles would be 
trained simultaneously with the intellect, in the various 



mechanical industries, and agricultural and horticultural 
pursuits, budding, grafting, and training fruit trees, vines, 
and shrubbery, the propagation of Bowers, etc., on which the 
vast amount of waste energies that I had witnessed among 
boys, especially, which were the occasion of nearly all the 
rudeness and disorder, might be advantageously and pleas- 
antly employed under skilled direction. 

Hallowell was unanimously elected as President and this tact 
was publicized in the college bulletin several weeks before 
he himself had heard of the selection. After conferring with 
the trustees' head, Charles Benedict Calvert. Professor Hallo- 
well accepted. He assumed his office in mid-October, about 
six weeks after the opening of school. The other three mem- 
bers of the faculty had apparently been awaiting his arrival, 
since all matters of administration and organization had been 
left untouched by them. Professor Hallowell pursued his new 
duties with great zeal; however a break in his already frail 
health caused him to resign in early 1860. after but a few 
months as President. 

The first commencement exercises were held in 1862 when 
Thomas Franklin and Wm. B. Sands received their diplomas. 
Two more students, Charles Baltimore Calvert, son of the 
President of the Board of Trustees, and W. B. Todd, gradu- 
ated in 1863. The Class of 1864 included David Hall, Edwin 
Hall. L. Roberts and Franklin Waters. Because of the Civil 
War and the hard times thereafter, there were no graduations 
until that of Francis A. Soper in 1871. 

The shortage of student personnel during the Civil War 
meant that the Maryland Agricultural College was going to 
have financial difficulties. The General Assembly designated 
the school as recipient of the land-grant funds under the 
terms of the Morrill Act of 1862. Even this was not enough. 
In 1866 the Trustees appealed to the legislature for aid. As 
a result, the state took over a one-half interest in the College 
and also 12 seats on the 17-mcmber Board of Trustees. 

There was a great turn-over in the office of President, as 
well as the student body. The Reverend J. W. Scott suc- 
ceeded Hallowell in 1860. followed by Professor Colby, 
1860-61; Professor Henry Onderdonk. 1861-64; and Profes- 
sor N. B. Worthington. 1864-67. In 1867-68 Professor 
C. L. C. Minor was the first to hold the title. President of 
the College. He was followed by Admiral Franklin Buchanan. 
1868-69 and Professor Samuel Register. 1869-73. 

The fact that the College was able to overcome financial 
difficulty and keep its doors open during the formulative 
years, although many of her older sister institutions were 
closed during this period of civil strife, is a monument to 
the early faculty and trustees. Better times were ahead 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1958 



17 




The man with the happy smile is 
Cyro Leal de Oliveira Mendes, a 
lawyer from Sao Paulo, Brazil- 
He is a graduate student in the 
College of Business and Public 
Administration, where he is study- 
ing economics and accounting. 
Mr. Mendes will continue his law 
practice in Brazil after a two-year 
stay at the University. 



Mrs. Safiningrat Soedjono is a 
student in Home Economics. As 
a housewife from Bandung, In- 
donesia, she is interested in learn- 
ing the latest, most scientific meth- 
ods used in American homes. She 
plans eventually to return to In- 
donesia and to put into practice 
in her own home what she has 
learned here. 



Shading his eyes from the sun is 
Julio Blanco, who obviously finds 
Maryland sunshine as bright as 
that of Santa Clara, Cuba, his 
home. He is a freshman in en- 
gineering and hopes to earn a 
master's degree before returning 
home. 



Mr. Ohn Mating, from Pyinm 
Burma, has the hopeful tool 
the student who wants to 
prove conditions in his n\ 
country. A graduate studem 
Plant Pathology, Ohn will re 
home when his studies are t 
pleted to become a teacher il 
agricultural college. 



Foreign Students Give Campus International Flavor 



Enrolled in the University this year are nearly three 
hundred foreign students from countries all over the world. 
They come from Asia, from Europe, from Latin America, 
from Canada: north, south, east, and west, are all represented 
on the University's College Park campus. 

All new students find their first experience with University 
life an exciting and bewildering affair, but for the foreign 
student, these feelings are intensified. Everything is doubly 
strange, doubly exciting, doubly bewildering. For under- 
graduates with no previous university experience, there are 
times when the new way of life seems almost completely 
overwhelming. 

On hand to help out during this period of adjustment is 
Professor Furman A. Bridgers, Foreign Student Adviser. The 
students flock to his office, requesting help in registration, in 
finding housing, in understanding immigration regulations. 
The office is busy almost constantly especially during the two 
weeks before classes start. Professor Bridgers runs his office 
with limited assistance: it is his responsibility to interview 
each student, phone for housing arrangements, and see that 
each student receives all the help possible in adjusting to 
community and University life. 

Within the community there are several organizations offer- 
ing their services to the foreign student. Recently, for ex- 
ample, the Progress Club of College Park, the Society of 
Friends of College Park, and the Foreign Student Service 
Council of Washington arranged for foreign students to be 
the dinner guests of American families September 13, 14, 
and 15 (a Friday, Saturday and Sunday). Experiences such 



as these express the American sense of hospitality and are 
helpful to foreign students trying to become familiar with 
American customs. 

The dinner invitations were part of an Orientation Week- 
end for foreign students, conducted the weekend before 
September registration. Undergraduates were required to 
attend the activities of Orientation Weekend and graduate 
students were welcome to attend if they wished. On Friday, 
September 13, classification tests were given to determine 
whether special instruction in English would be necessary. 
Based on the results of these tests, students may be required 
to take Foreign Language 1 — instruction in English taught 
as a foreign language. Some 35 students are now enrolled 
in the course. Speech 3 may also be taken if a student wants 
to reduce his foreign accent, and much personal attention is 
given those who take the course. 

Friday evening following the examinations, the first social 
event of the year took place for foreign students, with the 
annual Welcome Party. They gathered in the Student Union 
for an evening of square dancing, called by Mr. Edward 
Gordon of Michigan Park Hills, Hyattsville. The affair was 
a wonderful success. 

One of the outstanding events of the year for foreign 
students is Foreign Student Day. Sponsored by the Foreign 
Student Council of Greater Washington, it was held this 
year on October 25. Thirty students from the University and 
Professor Bridgers were guests for the evening of Mrs. Walter 
Lippman, at her home on Woodley Road, N. W. Through- 
out the day, the students were guests of the Cosmos Club, 



18 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Soedjono is pictured with Professor Bridgers in his office 
where he is discussing immigration regulations. 



Christodoulos Doudoulis, from 

Thessaloniki, Greece, is a first-year 
student in mechanical engineering. 
Although an M.I'., degree seems a 
long way in the future. Chris 
would like to return home even- 
tually to work for a firm of en- 
gineers. 



The young man pictured hit, is 
a first-year engineering student 
from Havana, (aha. Lorenzo I 
po.sito hopes to return to ( idui 
after his graduation. 



the National Geographic Society, the American Security and 
Trust Co., The Acacia Life Insurance Co., and the United 
States Department of Commerce. The various programs 
were designed to introduce the foreign students to the busi- 
I ness, educational, cultural and social life of the Nation's 
Capital. 

Miss Bahieh E. Mousa, a junior in the College of Arts 
and Sciences and a native of Jordan, met President Eisen- 
hower at White House ceremonies as a representative of the 
foreign students from the University. 

Judging from the news items in The International News- 
letter, a mimeographed publication issued occasionally by 
Professor Bridgers, there is no lack of social life during the 
school year. Community programs and campus events spon- 
sored by the International Club provide many opportunities 
Tor students of all lands to get together for recreation. In 
addition to its extensive social program, the International 
Club plays an important role in the cultural life of the 
(University by bringing to the campus speakers from various 
embassies and government agencies in Washington, as well 
jas sponsoring debates and panel discussions. 

Despite the assistance given the foreign students, problems 
Wise which the American boy or girl never has to worry 
■about. For example, a student visa does not allow its holder 
Ijto seek employment without permission of the Immigration 
Service. If he should be here without sufficient funds, a com- 
plicated procedure must take place before he can take part- 
time work. In many countries there is a restriction on the 
number of dollars one can purchase, so the possibility of 
[running short of funds is very real. At the end of a year 
|]a student must renew his stay, again through a process of 
Ailing out application forms for Immigration examination. 
Housing, too, may be a problem, especially if the student 
wishes to cook. Many of the students want a room with 
cooking facilities, a combination which is hard to find. The 
:ooking facilities are important to them because they like to 
be able to prepare meals as they would in their native coun- 



tries. A check over the list of addresses of foreign students 
indicates that many of them move around a bit before they 
finally get settled. 

The majority of foreign students are on student visas. They 
come here to study and eventually return home again: they 
are non-immigrant. Most of them come here on their own 
initiative at their own expense. Statistics for the United 
States as a whole indicate that of the 40,000 foreign students, 
62% receive no aid for schooling. A limited number have 
Fulbright grants which pay for travel expenses. Some receive 
Smith-Mundt Grants which pay all expenses. Broken down 
into percentages, 28.5% receive assistance from private insti- 
tutions, 4.8% have scholarships from their own government, 
and 4.7% receive scholarship aid from the United States 
government. 

At the University, as is the case in most American univer- 
sities, the majority of foreign students enrolled come from 
Asian countries. The largest number of foreign students 
representing a single country are Nationalist Chinese, with 
India in second place. In all, over fifty countries are repre- 
sented. The most popular departments of study are physics, 
chemistry, geography, botany, sociology, business administra- 
tion, physical education, and child study. 

Of course everyone wants to know for what particular 
reasons these students choose the University of Maryland. 
Some of them are children of diplomats or representatives 
of international organizations who are stationed in Washing- 
ton. Others have heard of the work of a particular professor 
in the field in which they study, and they come here to work 
with him. News of excellent departmental educational pro- 
grams travels far and wide. 

Still others are here because alumni of the University, living 
in many parts of the world, have recommended Maryland. 
Praise of the alma mater has so impressed brighl young 
students that they come here on the word ol one ol its 
graduates. 



IANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



19 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



Great Season Predicted for Millikarfs Men 



With a team that has more poten- 
tial than any he has had, Terrapin 
Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan sets sail 
on his eighth year at Maryland with a 
sparkle in his eye but also with tongue 
in cheek. The 1957-58 season promises 
to be one that will find some fine "big" 
boys on the court for the Terps. Also 
on the credit side is the return of eight 
lettermen. including four from last 
year's starting five and a real hustler 
and ball hawk who has returned from 
the service. But still Millikan has the 
usual problem, a big "if." 

There has been a great deal of excite- 
ment and anxiety created around the 
College Park campus that this would be 
the finest basketball team in Mary- 
land history and would be one that will 
bring the University national recogni- 
tion. And it is known throughout the 
basketball coaching fraternity that Mil- 
likan is one of the best. Yes, there is a 
great deal of potential and experience, 
but some of the "if" stems from the 
fact that the big boys on whom every- 
body is looking to in order to help make 
this an outstanding team are sopho- 
mores — Al Bunge, six feet, eight and 
one-half inches; Bob McDonald, six 
feet, seven inches; and Charles McNeil, 
six feet, six inches. The other part of 
the "if" is Milikan's real good big man 
Bunge. Late this spring, the highly 
touted Bunge, who had a great fresh- 
man year and naturally caused a lot of 
joy, contacted colitis. His recovery has 
been slow, but in early drills he has 
come along and should be ready for a 
fine season. Just when he will be at 
full strength and be the value to the 
team that Millikan knows he will be is 
a thought that cannot be answered. 
Only time will tell. 

Regardless of this necessary tongue 
in cheek factor, it has been quite some 
time since a Maryland team has had 
such an outstanding nucleus with which 

20 



to work in some terrific sophomores. 
Returning from last season's starting 
five are seniors Nick Davis, John Na- 
cincik, Perry Moore, and junior Jim 
Halleck. Other fine lettermen substi- 
tutes of last year back as juniors are 
Bill Murphy and Doc Weingarten. Add 
to that these terrific basketball players; 
Tom "Skinny" Young, a great floor 
man and ball-hawk who returns for his 
senior year following a hitch in the 
service; Gene Danko, the highly touted 
soph of last season who injured his 
ankle the second game of the season 
and didn't see action until the final 
three games; soph Jerry Bechtle, a high 
school All-American; soph Jerry Shana- 
han who was highly sought after and 
was a big star for the frosh last winter; 
and soph Pete Kruker, one of the 
keenest competitors on the team. 

Davis, Nacincik, and Halleck lead 
the returnees in scoring. Davis had 330, 
Nacincik 311, and Halleck 309, an in- 
dication of the balance of the scoring 
on the team. Halleck, along with 
Moore, is a tremendous rebounder. It 
is encouraging to think they will get 
such fine help from Bunge, McNeil. 
and McDonald. Bunge led the frosh in 
scoring and rebounding. He averaged 
17.2 points a game with his 241 points. 
He was followed by Shanahan with 235 
points and a 16.8 mark. McNeil was 
the other double figure frosh with 205 
points and a 14.7 average. The Terp 
frosh of last season, winning 12 and los- 
ing two, hit the 100 or better point 
total five times and were in the 90 
column four times. No other Mary- 
land team, freshman or varsity, ever 
hit the 100 mark. 

While speaking of the outlook, we 
cannot overlook the defensive strength 
that characterizes a Maryland team. 
Millikan's teams always have been one 
of the nation's top teams on defense 
and he has led the conference in this 



department all seven years he has been 
coaching here. There is no question that 
he has one of the top defensive basket- 
ball coaching minds in the game. His 
players are extremely well schooled in 
defensive skills. This season will be no 
exception. 

So the early prospects for the Red 
and White are good. "If" the credits 
can cancel out the debits then Mary- 
land, the team that took national cham- 
pion North Carolina into a double over- 
time last year before losing 65-61, 
could reach its highest pinnacle in its 
basketball history. 




Here comes John Nacincik! 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



A Sportswritefs Estimate of 
Tommy Mont and the 1957 
Terrapins 



Rather than rehash a lot oe old 
statistics and give alumni a game-by- 
game review of the past football season. 
I am reprinting here in its entirety a 
column written by Al Costello. staff 
reporter for the Baltimore News-Post. 
Mr. Costello says everything we want 
to say — and more. See for yourself. 



The heat was terrific; the humidity a 
smothering blanket, and maybe the man 
was suffering from some kind of rash 
when he said, ungrammatically but with 
rude emphasis: 

"They ain't got it and Mont ain't got 
it." 

It was a dog-day, was last September 
14. It wasn't fit weather for beast or 
football player. But there, down in 
Byrd Stadium, College Park, were the 
fledgling 1957 Maryland Terps, going 
through their last full scrimmage under 
game conditions prior to opening the 
season one week later against mighty 
Texas A & M in likewise-searing Dallas. 

The players were sweat-drenched. 
They pushed and tugged on the foot- 
ball with dutiful persistence rather than 
with the enthusiastic vigor a squad is 
expected to show just one week before 
the opener Try as they did, the boys 
were dragging with a listlessness that 
should have been alarming. 

And it was alarming to the ungram- 
matical but outspoken alumnus, who 
was carefully avoiding the blazing sun 
in a patch of shade high up in the sta- 
dium, where any stray breath of breeze 
would have to reach. But there wasn't 
any shade or breeze for Coach Tommy 
Mont and his boys. 

They had to "sweat out" both the 
immediate heat of the weather and the 
guaranteed "heat" that was sure to 
come from alumni, "M" Club, Terra- 
pin Club and other agencies close to 
the university, if another season, like 
the 2-7-1 record of 1956 resulted. 
Especially Mont. 

This is to say, as an opinion only, 
that Mont and his Terps have come a 
long way since that hot September day 
of pre-season practice. It is also an 
opinion, too, that the man who allowed 
as how "they ain't got it and Mont 
ain't got it" was dead wrong and, it is 
imagined, that as a red-hot alumnus, he 



must be glad of it. mm that the cool- 
ness of November has replaced the 
fiery breath of September. 

As the Terps closed with Virginia, 
they stood a respectable 5-5 in a sea- 
son that could have been another dis- 
astrous one. They started out with 
three losses in a row and came back to 
win five of the next seven. The teams 
that beat the Terps, Texas A & M, 
N. C. State, Duke, Tennessee and Clem- 
son have lost only 7 games among 
them. 

As early as the second game, when 
the Terps lost to N. C. State by a hor- 
rendous 48-13 score, there were grum- 
blings and under currents of talk that 
did not compliment Mont. At one 
stage, an assistant coach, a Mont man 
and loyal to the core, was asked if he 
would take over if Mont stepped down 
or was replaced in the near future. 

The assistant did not hesitate to let 
the questioner know exactly how 
Mont's staff felt. "I wouldn't take over 
under any circumstances and I am sure 
none of the other coaches would," he 
answered with finality. 

Through it all Mont said little and 
worked hard. Eventually his green 
juniors and sophs began to absorb his 
teachings. One by one they began to 
replace veterans and the soundness of 
Mont's coaching began to show up as 
the Terps grew tougher and tougher on 
defense. 

The conclusions that would have to 
be drawn are almost obvious. The 
opinion now is almost unanimous that 
Mont and his Terps have survived their 
most perilous hours; that Mont has 
proved he is a good, sound football 
coach; that the fires of competition have 
singed him only slightly and that he is 
very much smarter for it; and that, 
with excellent material coming along, 
before very long, possibly by 1958, 
M^ont and Maryland will be back up 
there in a photo finish with the coun- 
try's best for top honors, just as the 
Terps were in the best days of Jim 
Tatum. 

With all his trials and tribulations, 
Mont has grimly stuck to a dishearten- 
ing task with patience, dignity, diligence 
and GUTS. And apparently has 
whipped it. 



# 




^^ 




Stand-out Ed Cooke, senior end for the 
Terps this year — a fine receiver. good 
blocker and lop defensive man. Winner 
of the first Guckeyson Award this year. 




Rodney Breedlove. sophomore guard — one 
of the finest prospects al the I ; niversily 
in many a year. Breedlove will be a 
man to watch in IV58. 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



21 



News from the Clubs 




Ed Cooke expresses his thanks for 
Guckeyson award. 



M CLUB AWARDS 

Winner of the first John William 
Guckeyson Memorial Award presented 
by the "M" Club is outstanding Mary- 
land athlete, Ed Cooke. The award was 
made along with several others at the 
Club's annual banquet staged this year 
December 14 at the Hotel Statler, 
Washington. Presentation was made by 
C. Robert Boucher, General Chairman 
of the banquet. 

Captain Bill Guckeyson who gave his 
life in the defense of his country was 
one of the finest athletes ever to attend 
the University. 

First recipient of this award, Ed 
Cooke, is a 21 year old senior from 
Norfolk. Standing six feet, four inches, 
and weighing 235 pounds, he was de- 
scribed at the beginning of the football 
season as "one of the Terps' finest end 
prospects since the early 50's when the 
Red and White had such lanky stalwarts 
as Pete Augsberger and Lloyd Colter- 
yahn." In addition to his football 
prowess, Cooke is also a track star. 
During spring football practice, Ed 
participates full time with the track 
team. He was the indoor and outdoor 
shot-put champion in the ACC for the 
second consecutive year, setting a new 
school and ACC dual meet mark with a 
toss of 53 feet, one and one half inches 
in the Virginia meet. He also throws 
the discus and the javelin and won all 
three events in the Virginia meet. His 
track ability is also useful on the foot- 
ball field where he outruns some of the 



backs. He is a fine defensive player, 
hard to get around, and his speed, size, 
and exceptional ability to pass make 
him a dangerous target. 

A number of additional awards were 
presented. The Chales P. McCormick 
Award went this year to James R. 
Kappler, lacrosse player. Presentation 
was made by William W. Larash, First 
Vice President of the Club. The Talbot 
T. Speer Award was made to Alva B. 
Grim, Maryland track star; presentation 
was by Joseph Deckman, President of 
the University's Alumni Association. 
Howard ("Howie") B. Dare, Jr., foot- 
ball standout, received the annual A. V. 
Williams Award presented by Mr. Wil- 
liams, President of the Williams Con- 
struction Company. 

Honorary M Club memberships, 
presented by George Knepley, President 
of the Club, were awarded to Herbert 
H. Goodman, John W. Miller. General 
Curtis E. LeMay and Roy Howard 
Sievers. 

Edmund T. Daley, District Attorney 
for the District of Columbia, presented 
State of Maryland, Hall of Fame 
Awards to Charles E. Keller, Jacob M. 
Slagle, Theodore E. Straus and to Dr. 
Milton M. Whitehurst (in memoriam) 
received by his niece, Mrs. Camelia 
Whitehurst Kreiger. 

All-American Awards for lacrosse 
were presented to James R. Kappler 
and Ernest J. Betz. Coach Al Heagy ac- 
cepted for the absent Kappler. Presenta- 
tions were made by Mr. Deckman. 

The Outstanding Athlete Award was 
presented by William W. Cobey, Uni- 
versity Director of Athletics, to Roy 
Edward Sievers, the Washington Sena- 
tors brilliant first baseman. 

Ill and unable to accept the Club's 
Distinguished Service Award, General 
LeMay was represented by Major 
General Joseph F. Carroll, Chief of 
Security Division, USAF. Presentation 
was made by Dr. Elkins. General 
Carroll told the gathering he has special 
pride in the University for the reason 
that the largest AFROTC is located 
there. 

Following the formal presentations, 
Mr. Boucher expressed the Club's ap- 
preciation for the excellent work per- 
formed by Toastmaster Morrie Siegel 
and Dr. W. Lawrence Smallwood, Pro- 
gram Director. 



BALTIMORE CLUB 

About 230 alumni attended the Pres- 
idents' Reception at the Park Plaza 
Hotel, November 21. The party was 
given by the Baltimore Club of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Asso- 



ciation to introduce its members to Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins. President of the Uni- 
versity; Joseph Deckman, President of 
the General Alumni Council; and Sam 
Silber. President of the Baltimore 
Alumni Club. 




Pictured as she receives a plaque in recog- 
nition of years of devoted service to the 
New York Alumni Club and the General 
Alumni Association is Miss Sarah Morris, 
past Vice President of the General Alumni 
Council. Shown with her are Mr. Joseph 
Deckman (left), Past President of the M 
Club and now President of the Alumni 
Association, and Mr. David Brigham, cur- 
rently a member of the Alumni Council 
and Secretary-Treasurer of the Alumni 
Association. The presentation took place 
at a banquet held December 10 at the 
Harvard Club in New York City. 



ALUMNI CLUB OF 
GREATER NEW YORK 
Tuesday, December 10, was a big night 
for University of Maryland Alumni in 
the New York area. Sixty-eight alumni 
had sent in reservations for the banquet 
held at the Harvard Club, but the sub- 
way strike and traffic tie-up threatened 
to reduce the number to a handful. In 
spite of the traffic problems, the final 
count showed that 75 people had come. 
After dinner, Toastmaster Pete Eire- 
man introduced Dave Brigham. Direc- 
tor of Alumni Relations for the Uni- 
versity. Dave presented a plaque to 
Miss Sarah Morris from the Alumni 
Association in appreciation of her 
many years of devoted service to the 
Alumni Association and the New York 
Alumni Club. He told of Miss Morris's 
service as Vice President of the Alumni 
Council and as President of the New 
York Club, as well as her contributions 
to the success of "Charlie Keller Day" 
and her tireless efforts in behalf of the 



22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Newly elected officers of the Alumni Club 
of Greater New York are pictured left 
to right: Norman Thater, Treasurer; Dr. 
Irving Schein, Vice President; Hal McGay, 
President, and Ginnie Bennet, Secretary. 



New York Club. Toastmaster Eireman 
presented Miss Morris with a corsage 
of white orchids from the New York 
Club. 

Eireman then presented a slate of 
new officers suggested by the nominat- 
ing committee. Unanimously elected 
were Hal McGay, President; Dr. Irving 
Schein. Vice President; Ginnie Ben- 
nett, Secretary, and Norman Thater, 
Treasurer. 

After President McGay took over 
the chair, he introduced Joseph Deck- 
man, President of the General Alumni 
Council, as main speaker of the eve- 
ning. Mr. Deckman briefly told some 
of the history and tradition of the State 
of Maryland and its University adding 
that "the University of Maryland has 
some ivy of its own to be proud of." 
Mr. Deckman went on to discuss the 
University's academic standing and the 
program which has been set up for the 
University's future. In outlining the 
unified efforts of the Alumni Associa- 
tion and the University administration, 
Mr. Deckman told of weekly meetings 
of The Directors of Alumni Relations 
and University Relations with Presi- 
dential Assistant A. F. Cormeny to dis- 
cuss plans and problems of the new 
Greater University of Maryland Fund 
program. Purposes and objectives asso- 
ciated with this program, as enumer- 
ated by Mr. Deckman, are: develop- 
ment of a basic pride in the University 
by the alumni, making each school in 
the University the best in its field, 
active membership of interested alumni 
in strong enthusiastic alumni clubs, and 
closer faculty-alumni relations. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1958 



President McGay then introduced 
Hob Ward of the University's football 

coaching stall. Ward commented on 

the bright future oJ Maryland's football 
team oexl year, and reassured the 

members of the firm and sensible basis 
on which the University's entire athletic 
program is built. Next Mr. Ward 
showed and commented on a color 
movie of the Maryland-North Carolina 
football game including highlights of 
the visit of Queen Elizabeth to Bj rd 
Stadium. 

The meeting was adjourned and the 
members retired to the lounge. At this 
point Mr. Eireman once more called 
for the attention of those assembled 
and read two telegrams of congratula- 
tion addressed to Miss Morris, one 
from her employer, Matthew O'Brien, 
and one from Betty Mae O'Brien who 
is now a student at the University. The 
chuckle of the evening came when Mr. 
Eireman misread the telegram from 
Betty Mae, who is Miss Morris' god- 
child, and called her instead, Miss 
Morris' grandchild. 



Campus Notes 

(Continued from page 6) 



Other grants supporting research on 
the Baltimore campus including $1,282 
went to the School of Dentistry and 
$6,785 went to the school of Pharmacy. 

A total of $101,730 in research 
grants was awarded to faculty members 
on the University's College Park cam- 
pus. The funds are supporting investi- 
gations in poultry, botany, chemistry, 
entomology, zoology and psychology. 

UNIVERSITY AGAIN HOST FOR 

SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

SUMMER INSTITUTE 

The National Science Foundation has 
named the University as one of 99 
host institutions for the 1958 teaching- 
training programs for high school 
teachers in biology, chemistry, general 
science and physics. 

Associate Professor Joshua R. C. 
Brown, of the Department of Zoology, 
ha"s been appointed to head up the 
program. 

Approximately 5,000 high school and 
250 college teachers of science and 
mathematics will benefit during the 
summer of 1958 from these programs 
sponsored by the National Science 
Foundation at 108 summer institutes 
in 104 educational institutions. Awards 
of the grants total $5,340,000. 



"The summei institutes program ol 
the Foundation is m step with current 
plans foi strengthening the trainio 
scientists in the United States s.h.i 
Dr. Acan I Waterman, Directoi ol 
the I oundation. 

"Good science teachers are apt to be 
the first to stimulate an interest in 

science among our young people in 

secondary schools Bui it instruction is 

nol stimulating, and contains outdated 
concepts, it tends to weaken \ouths 
motivations toward science careers. 
Foundation-supported summer insti- 
tutes provide opportunities tor thou 
sands ol hard-pressed high school sci- 
ence teachers to learn at first hand the 
rapidly advancing developments in to- 
day's science, mathematics, and engi- 
neering." 

The Foundation grants to each sum- 
mer institute, including the Universits 
of Maryland, will cover costs of tuition 
and other fees for a specified number 
of teachers — from 20 to 1 00, the aver- 
age size to be approximately 50. Most 
institutes will pay stipends directly to 
participating teachers at a maximum 
rate of $75 per week. Additional al- 
lowances for dependents to a maximum 
of four and for travel are provided. 

Dr. Brown said today that he would 
accept inquiries and applications from 
high school teachers of Maryland. Dis- 
trict of Columbia, and surrounding 
states immediately. He advised that 
they be addressed: 

Dr. Joshua R. C. Brown. 
Department of Zoology, 
University of Maryland 
College Park. Maryland. 

1950 TV SCRIPT AWARD 
COMPETITION OPENS 

The Department of Speech announces 
the opening of the 1958 Victor Frenkil 
TV Script Award competition for stu- 
dents enrolled in colleges and univer- 
sities offering courses in radio and /or 
television. 

Entries should be sent to George F. 
Batka, Director. Radio-Television De- 
partment, Department of Speech. Uni- 
versity of Maryland at College Park. 
The winner will be notified by mail and 
public notice will be made through the 
pages of Variety and Broadcasting- 
Telecasting magazines on or about 
March 25, 1958. 

Entries must be original, not previ- 
ously produced, dramatic scripts, one 
hour in length. One entry per person 
only. All entries must be submitted in 
standard two-column television script 
form. Entrants should refrain from 
(Continued on next page) 

23 



using unusually complex production 
elements. Entries must be received by 
March 15, 1958. One prize of $500 
will be awarded the author of the best 
adjudged script. 

Entries will be judged on the basis 
of universality of theme and originality 
of content. Board of judges will be 
two faculty members from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland and one each from 
the executive or production depart- 
ments of stations wjz-tv, wbal-tv, 
and wmar-tv, Baltimore. Maryland. 
Decision of the judges will be final and 
no judges will comment on scripts. 

Entrants who wish their scripts re- 
turned should enclose an envelope and 
return postage with their manuscripts. 
Although all manuscripts will receive 
careful handling, the committee cannot 
assume responsibility for any script or 
original material submitted with a 
script. 

The University of Maryland Speech 
Department reserves first production 
rights on the prize-winning script. All 
subsequent production rights become 
the property of the author. 



Mr. McCormick Heads 
1958 Heart Fund Campaign 
Mr. Charles P. McCormick, Chairman 
of the Board of Regents and leading 
Baltimore industrialist, has been named 
National Chairman of the 1958 Heart 
Fund Campaign. The campaign is to 
be conducted throughout the country 
during February for support of re- 
search, education and community serv- 
ice of the Association, its affiliates and 
chapters. 

In accepting the appointment, Mr. 
McCormick, Board Chairman of the 
McCormick Company, world's largest 
producers of spices, tea and extracts, 
said: 

"This campaign will mark the tenth 
anniversary of the American Heart As- 
sociation as a national voluntary health 
agency, and as the spearheading force 
in the fight against diseases of the heart 
and circulation. 

"At a time when our attention has 
been urgently directed to the need for 
research in other fields of science, I am 
sure the American people will be more 
generous than ever before in support 
of heart research. We have come to 
understand that only through expanded 
heart research can we obtain the know- 
ledge so vitally needed to overcome this 
most serious threat to the nation's 
health — an enemy that is responsible 
for more than 800,000 deaths each 
year, or about 54 per cent of all deaths. 

"The accomplishments of research 



during the past ten years have taught 
us that there is indeed new hope for 
hearts' and that a gift now to the Heart 
Fund is an investment in the future — 
our children's future and our own." 

Mr. McCormick pointed out that the 
1958 campaign will reach its high point 
and climax with a nationwide door-to- 
door collection on Heart Sunday, 
February 23, with more than 1,500,000 
Heart Fund volunteers participating. A 
special solicitation of local business 
establishments in communities through- 
out the country, known as "Heart Day 
for Business." is planned for February 
4. 



Fund Operation 

(Continued from page 7) 



Those attending represented approxi- 
mately 1 7,500 alumni across the coun- 
try. They were: 

H. Edmund Semler, Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Mullinix, Mrs. Mildred Jones, Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Nystrom, Clayton Rey- 
nolds, J. E. DeKowzan, Morris Fedder, 
Eugene J. Magnani, Miss Jean Mag- 
nani, Virginia Conley, Mrs. Bessie 
Arnurius, Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Bohn. 
Bernard Smith, Charles B. Koons, Mr. 
and Mrs. Donald Jackson. Miss Helen 
V. Kramer, Thomas Beam, A. G. van 
Reuth, J. J. Krajovic, Dr. William H. 
Triplett, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Block, 
L. M. Silvester, J. W. Belcher, F. O. 
Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. William C. 
Strasser. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes Haw- 
kins, Dr. and Mrs. H. S. Rubinstein. 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry V. Davis, Mr. and 
Mrs. William E. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip Kyne, Mr and Mrs. S. Chester 
Ward, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Evans, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Archer, Dr. R. L. 
Hornbake, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Cissel, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. McCartney, Mr. and 
Mrs. R. C. O'Connor, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Stevens, Dr. and Mrs. A. O. 
Kuhn, Mr. and Mrs. William M. 
Kricker, Mr. Howard Soper. Donald 
Peacock, Dr. and Mrs. Edgar F. Ber- 
man. Dr. Harry Levin, Harry Boswell, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gurnie Hobbs, Dr. and 
Mrs. Homer K. Vann, Dr. and Mrs. 
John Krantz, Dr. Howard F. Kinna- 
mon. Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Chaffinch, 
Dr. and Mrs. T. R. O'Rourk, Howard 
Filbert, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Cormeny, 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Gwynn, Dr. and 
Mrs. Albert E. Goldstein, Dr. and Mrs. 
W. H. Elkins, Mr. and Mrs. S. R. 
Newell, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Orp- 
wood, Mr. and Mrs. Austin Diggs. 







College of 




AGRICULTURE 




A. B. 


Hamilton 



NATIONAL JUDGES 

Roscoe Whipp, '42, Associate County 
Agent, Rockville, received the thrill of 
a life time when the Maryland 4-H 
Dairy Cattle Judging Team which he 
coached won the National Contest at 
Waterloo, Iowa, in competition with 
representatives from 32 states. 

The Maryland team scored 1918 
points to win, followed closely by 
Michigan with 1912 points, with third 
place going to Washington. Maryland 
teams for a number of years have won 
this national contest and represented 
the United States in the international 
judging contest held each summer in 
England. 

Membership on the Maryland team 
was won by the four young people 
through years of training and in judg- 
ing competition at local, county, state, 
and regional contests. The team was 
composed of youths of families long 
identified with the dairy industry. They 
were Jerry Ensor, 19, of Forest Hill, 
Harford County, who placed third in 
the entire contest; Roberta Messer, 16, 
Gaithersburg, Montgomery County; 
James Ray Hill, 19, Woodbine, How- 
ard County; and Howard Stiles, 20, of 
Mount Airy, Frederick County. 

MARKET ANALYST 

Charles Harris, '57, is Assistant Market 
Analyst for the American Cyanamid 
Company and is located at 30 Rocke- 
feller Plaza, N. Y. 

HOOPES HONORED 

Herbert Hoopes, '30, was honored by 
his many friends at the Annual Meet- 
ing in Frederick for his two terms as 
head of the Maryland State Grange. 

HEADS U. N. MISSION 

Roger Burdette, '33, has returned to 
Lima, Peru as Acting Head of the Food 
and Agriculture Mission of the United 
Nations. Burdette and his family spent 
5 years in Chile where he was in charge 
of marketing work for FAO. Their 
daughter, Natalie, is a sophomore at 
Maryland in Business Administration. 

JUDGES ARGENTINE CATTLE 

J. Homer Remsberg, Past President of 
the Maryland Alumni Association and 
noted Holstein breeder of Middletown, 
Maryland, judged cattle at Argentina's 



24 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



world-famous Rosario Show last sum- 
mer. Judging cattle in South America 
is becoming a habit for Homer. For 
three successive years, 1952-1954, he 
officiated at the Chilean National Hol- 
stein Show. In 1955 and 1956 he 
judged cattle in Columbia. It proves 
the old statement. "A good man is al- 
ways in demand." 

SMITH CIVIC LEADER 

Verlin W. Smith, '42, Oakton, Virginia 
has combined his professional and civic 
interests to improve soil conditions in 
his county. As head of the farm sales 
department of the Francis Powell Hill 
Realty Company he became interested 
in rural zoning and planning problems. 

' Working with the County Agricultural 
Agent they were successful in having 
the Soil Conservation Service study 
their soil problem. Smith also serves 

', as a member of Fairfax County Zoning 
Appeals Board. 

SEEDING IN SAUDI ARABIA 

The most recent activities of Dr. J. 
Richard King, Ph.D. 1935, is given 
publicity in an article in the September. 
1957 Southern Seedsman. Dr. King is 
on leave from Louisiana State Uni- 
versity to head a U. S. Air Force 
experiment in Agriculture at the Dhah- 
ran Airfield in Saudi Arabia. The pur- 
pose of the project, which will ulti- 
mately cover 100 acres of the once 
barren sandy plain, is to supply fresh 

i vegetables and fruits for the isolated 
base without the expense of flying them 
in from hundreds of miles away and 

| as a morale builder among the air base 
personnel. As an extra dividend, mod- 
ern farming methods will be demon- 

! strated in an ancient land. During 
World War II, Dr. King helped develop 

', a project for raising fresh vegetables 

; for our troops on Guadalcanal. 

! 

ALLARD TO HAITI 

Howard F. Allard, B.S. 1936, M.S. 
Botany 1937, his wife and two children 
are currently on three months' leave 
in this country after spending several 
years in Agriculture with the I.C.A. in 
Peru. They are awaiting reassignment 
to Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 

Dr. Robert E. Jones, M.S. 1940, 
Ph.D. Botany 1942, is now President 
of the NORKEM Corporation of Yak- 
ima, Washington. Dr. Jones and his 
associates are suppliers of agricultural 
chemicals for extensive farming opera- 
tion in the Yakima area. 

Among recent visitors in College 
Park were Dr. E. C. Pierce, Ph.D. Bot- 
any 1942, his wife and two children. 
(Continued on next page) 



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ton, Ohio. 

OCTOGENARIAN FLOWER WINNER 

It will be of interest to alumni that Dr. 
J. B. S. Norton, Professor Emeritus of 
Botany, and his wife recently received 
the best in show award for a dahlia 
that was entered in the Hyattsville 
Horticultural Club show. Dr. Norton 
is a charter member of the club that 
was organized in 1917. He was retired 
from the University in 1942 at the age 
of 70. 

SMOOT TO FORT DIETRICH 

Dr. John J. Smoot, B.S. 1942, M.S. 
1948, Ph.D. Botany 1951, has recently 
accepted a position as plant pathologist 
with the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, Agricultural Marketing Service. 
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PROFESSORS PRESENT PAPERS 

Dr. Ellis R. Lippincott, Professor of 
Chemistry, presented papers at two in- 
ternational meetings last summer. One 
was at the meeting of the European 
Spectroscopy Society at Freiburg, Ger- 
many; the other, at the International 
Symposium on Hydrogen Bonding in 
Ljubljana, Yugoslavia. Dr. Lippincott 
also attended the meeting of the Inter- 
national Congress of Pure and Applied 
Chemistry in Paris before returning to 
the United States. 

Dr. William J. Bailey, Research Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, with Charles N. 
Bird, presented a paper at the Division 
of Organic Chemistry of the American 
Chemical Society in New York, Sep- 
tember 1957. With William G. Carpen- 
ter and Matthew Hermes, Dr. Bailey 
also presented a paper at the meeting 
of the Division of Polymer Chemistry. 

Dr. Wilkins Reeve, Professor of 
Chemistry, presented a paper at the 
Division of Analytical Chemistry of 
the American Chemical Society in New 
York at the September meeting. 



26 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



DR. BROWN AT CALIFORNIA 

Dr. George M. Brown, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, is at the California 
Institute of Technology for research 
during his sabbatical year. 

NEW FACULTY MEMBER 

Dr. Alfred C. Boyd, Jr. has joined the 
faculty as Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry. He received his degree from 
Purdue University in June 1957. 

DRS. PARKER AND I. ARENAS 
VISIT DR. WHITE 

Dr. C. A. Parker of the Admiralty 
Materials Laboratory, Holton-Heath, 
Poole, Dorsett, England was a recent 
visitor to Dr. Charles E. White, Profes- 
sor of Chemistry. Dr. Parker is inter- 
ested in fluorescence analysis and in 
trace analysis. 

On October 3 Dr. White had as a 
visitor Dr. Arquidamo A. Larenas of 
the Universidad Central, Quito, Equa- 
dor, South America. Dr. Larenas, who 
speaks no English, was accompanied 
by his daughter who acted as interpreter 
while he and Dr. White discussed 
fluorescence and trace analysis. 

NOTES FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ENGLISH 

Harold J. Herman, '52, has returned 
to the University of Maryland as an 
instructor in the Department of Eng- 
lish. Since 1952, Mr. Herman has been 
a graduate student and part-time 
teacher of English at the University of 
Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. 

Paul W. Whitney, 51, has been ap- 
pointed instructor in the Department 
of English. Since 1951, Mr. Whitney 
has studied at the University of Chi- 
cago and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and has taught English at Temple 
University in Philadelphia and at West- 
minster College in New Wilmington, 
Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Cecil R. Ball, M.A. '34, Associ- 
ate Professor of English and a member 
of the Maryland faculty since 1932, has 
returned to the College Park campus 
from two years of teaching in the Uni- 
versity's program for military personnel 
in Europe. Dr. Ball taught Maryland 
classes in France and Germany. 

Dr. Minerva Martin, Instructor in 
English since 1945, is teaching this year 
in the University's junior college for 
military dependents in Munich, Ger- 
many. 

DR. SUTTON JOINS FACULTY 

Dr. Paul Sutton, Jr., has been appointed 

Instructor in Philosophy for 1957-58. 

(Continued on next page) 




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He replaces Dr. W. E. Schlaretzki, who 
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ELECTED SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Dr. Lucius Garvin, Head of the De- 
partment of Philosophy, was recently 
elected Secretary-Treasurer of the 
American Philosophical Association. He 
is also serving currently as Program 
Chairman of the Annual meeting of the 
American Society for Aesthetics, held 
in Washington, D. C. from October 
25-27. 



DR. LEED NAMED DEPUTY DIRECTOR 

Dr. Russell E. Leed is the new Deputy 
Director for the Production Division of 
the Atomic Energy Commission's Oak 
Ridge Operations. A native of Denver, 
Pennsylvania, Dr. Leed received his 
bachelor of science degree in chemistry 
from Franklin and Marshall College. 
He continued his graduate work while 
teaching at the University of Maryland, 
and received his master's and doctor's 
degrees in physical chemistry from the 
University. 

Dr. Leed succeeds Charles A. Keller 
who recently was named Director of 
the Production Division. As Deputy 
Director, Dr. Leed shares responsibility 
for the Commission's production pro- 
grams at Oak Ridge; Paducah, Ken- 
tucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. 

He first became associated with the 
atomic energy program in 1950 as a 
research participant associated with the 
homogeneous reactor project at Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory. He joined 
the Commission as a chemist in 1951, 
and was Assistant Chief of the Plant 
Operations Branch when promoted to 
his current position. 

MR. ERBE ELECTED PRESIDENT 

Mr. T. H. Erbe, '36, of the T. H. Erbe 
Company, has recently been elected 
President of the Chartered Life Under- 
writer Chapter of the Travelers Insur- 
ance Company, Hartford, Connecticut, 
one of the largest life insurance com- 
panies in the nation. 

While at the University, Mr. Erbe 
was a member of Phi Delta Theta social 
fraternity and Omicron Delta Kappa 
honorary leadership fraternity and he 
is now a member of the Merchants 
Club, the Mt. Washington Club and 
is Past President of the Optimist Club 
of Roland Park. 



28 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Mr. Erbe has been in the insurance 
business for 20 years and has given 
many lectures before civic groups and 
medical associations. "Chartered Life 
Underwriter" is a professional degree 
awarded only to those who pass rigid 
examinations and meet stipulated re- 
quirements of performing insurance 
service to the community. 

DR. HARRISON TO OXFORD 

Dr. Arthur P. Harrison, who received 
his B.S. 1948, M.S. 1950, and Ph.D. 
1952, in Bacteriology, has recently 
left for Oxford University, England, 
where he will study under Professor 
Sir Cyril Hinshelwood. Sir Hinshel- 
wood was the 1956 recipient of the 
Nobel prize in Chemistry. Dr. Har- 
rison, since graduating from Maryland, 
has been on the staff of the Biology 
Department at Vanderbilt University. 

SPEECH DEPARTMENT SPONSORS FORUM 

The Speech Department and the Cal- 
vert Debate Club sponsored a Forum 
on Monday, October 21, from 4 to 
5:30 p.m. in the Student Union Audi- 
torium. 

The topic for discussion concerned 
the "Right-to-Work" labor laws and the 
important issues involved in the 1957- 
58 intercollegiate debate proposition: 
"Resolved: That the Requirement of 
Membership in a Labor Organization 
as a Condition of Employment Should 
Be Illegal." 

Featured speakers were Mr. Arthur 
Irwin, Staff Attorney of the U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce, and Mr. Jack 
Barbash, Director of the Research and 
Education Department of the Industrial 
Union Department of the AFL-CIO. 
Both speakers were among the more 
informed experts on this phase of labor 
problems. 

Morris Rogers, President of the Cal- 
vert Debate Club opened the Forum 
and Miss Dorothy West, Club member, 
introduced the speakers and served as 
moderator. The Forum consisted of 
short speeches by these authorities and 
a question-answer period for the audi- 
ence. All interested persons were in- 
vited to attend. 



MUSIC FACULTY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Bryce Jordan, co-author (with 
Homer Ulrich, Head of the Depart- 
ment) has written a Student Manual 
for Music: A Design for Listening. The 
manual is to accompany the textbook 
recently published by Dr. Ulrich, 
Music: A Design for Listening. 
(Continued on next page) 




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Professor Rose Marie Grentzer is the 
author of a major article on music 
education throughout the world in the 
new edition of the Encyclopedia Ameri- 
cana. She is also the editor of a new 
basic series of music books for the ele- 
mentary school, to be published by the 
C. C. Birchard Company. Professor 
Grentzer is curriculum consultant in 
music for a course of study being writ- 
ten for the Washington, D. C. public 
schools' elementary music program and 
curriculum consultant to the music 
committee which is writing a course of 
study for elementary school music in 
Baltimore County. She recently pre- 
sented a lecture-demonstration to grad- 
uate students at the Eastman School of 
Music, University of Rochester. Dur- 
ing the summer she gave six lecture- 
demonstrations at the University of 
Wisconsin's Summer Workshop in 
Music Education. On October 17 she 
gave the elementary music demonstra- 
tion for the annual meeting of the 
Maryland Music Education Association 
in Baltimore. 

STRAUSBAUGH ELECTED PRESIDENT 

At its annual meeting October 10th at 
the Emerson Hotel in Baltimore, Pro- 
fessor Warren L. Strausbaugh, Chair- 
man of the Department of Speech and 
Dramatic Art, was elected President of 
the Maryland Society for Crippled 
Children and Adults. For the past year 
Professor Strausbaugh has been serving 
as its Vice-President. 

PARTICIPATE IN LEADERSHIP CLINIC 

Mrs. Hester Beall Provenson, Assistant 
Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art, 
participated in a Leadership Clinic at 
the National Convention of the General 
Federation of Women's Clubs at the 
Statler Hotel, October 8. 

The Moderator of the Leadership 
Clinic was Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 
former member of the University of 
Maryland Board of Regents. 

The other participants were Dr. Al- 
bert S. Croft, Department of Speech, 
University of Oklahoma, and Mrs. 
Henry M. Robert, Jr., Past President 
of the General Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 

ROSS ADDRESSES MEETING 

Dr. Sherman Ross, Professor of Psy- 
chology, presented an address on "Psy- 
chopharmacology" to the Research and 
Development Section of the American 
Drug Manufacturer's Association at its 
meetings on October 8-9 in Rye, New 
York. Dr. Ross has recently returned 



30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



to the campus from a period of service 
as Assistant Chief, Psychopharmacology 
Service Center, National Institute of 
Mental Health, where he helped found 
and establish this Center. 

ACTIVITIES IN THE DEPARTMENT OF 
HISTORY 

The Department of History is one of 
the busiest and most active on the 
campus. There are 25 full-time teach- 
ers, of whom 5 are full Professors, 2 
are Associate Professors, 8 are Assistant 
Professors, and 10 are Instructors. The 
Department is responsible for the in- 
struction of approximately 2,700 under- 
graduate students and 43 graduate stu- 
dents. Its course offerings embrace a 
wide field of subjects in American His- 
tory, European History and certain 
special areas as Latin America, Mexico, 
Canada, the British Empire, the Far 
East, Southeast Asia, and the Middle 
East. Expansion of our courses to em- 
brace the Middle East started this year. 
After a careful search, we invited Dr. 
Helen Rivlin from the Harvard Middle 
East Institute to assume the position. 
She is a Ph.D. of Oxford University but 
did her undergraduate work at Roches- 
ter and took her M.A. at Radcliffe. 
The introduction of courses on the 
Middle East should attract considerable 
interest. The offerings embrace both 
undergraduate and graduate courses. 

The Department has a very active 
chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the na- 
tional honorary history fraternity. 
Speakers of prominence are presented 
at its monthly meetings, which are 
always well attended. In addition, the 
University was host to a regional con- 
ference in connection with the sesqui- 
centennial celebration and another one 
is scheduled for the spring of 1958. 
Dr. Richard H. Bauer has served as a 
member of its National Council for 
several years and has continuously acted 
as advisor to the local chapter. 

Members of the instructional staff 
have a very active program of research 
under way which promises to result 
in a continuing output of publications 
during the coming few years. Recogni- 
tion of this fact was given by the Com- 
mittee on Research and Publication, 
which awarded monetary grants to 5 
members of the Department in 1956-57 
and for this current year grants have 
been made to 6 members. Several of 
the research projects will be submitted 
for publication during the coming year. 
In this connection, special mention 
should be made of the projects of Dr. 
Wilhelmina Jashemski, who was the 
recipient of grants from the University 
(Continued on next page) 



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and the American Philosophical Society 
and who was given sabbatical leave 
during the second semester of 1956-57. 
Dr. Jashemski is making a significant 
study of Roman gardens. In connec- 
tion with her projects, she spent her 
sabbatical leave doing archaeological re- 
search in Greece, Asia Minor, and 
Pompeii. Another result of the trip was 
the making of approximately 3,500 
slides, which doubtless constitute the 
finest collection in their subject matter. 
These are of much value in connection 
with teaching her classes on the campus. 

In addition to the University research 
grants, special recognition has come to 
several members of the staff in connec- 
tion with their work. Associate Pro- 
fessor Donald C. Gordon has been a 
Fulbright scholar in Australia for the 
past year and will return to the campus 
for the coming second semester. As- 
sistant Professor David Sparks is cur- 
rently on sabbatical leave and is the 
holder of a Social Science Research 
Council grant, which has enabled him 
to work in Huntington Library (Cali- 
fornia) in connection with his projected 
biography of General Henry Wager 
Halleck. Assistant Professor Roland 
Stromberg has been given a grant by 
the Rockefeller Foundation to do re- 
search on the general problem of col- 
lective security. 

During the past year, members of 
the Department have completed and 
McGraw-Hill Book Company has pub- 
lished a textbook entitled American 
Civilization. The book was several 
years in the making. Thirteen members 
of the staff have contributed chapters 
but the final job of editing and rewrit- 
ing was completed by Drs. Gewehr, 
Gordon, Sparks, and Stromberg. This 
book represents a new approach to the 
problem of American History at the 
college level by presenting only basic 
ideas, institutions, developments, and 
American contributions. The text was 
published in May, 1957 and has been 
well received. 

Professor Horace S. Merrill has a 
new book in the Library of American 
Biography (Little, Brown and Com- 
pany, 1957). It is titled Bourbon 
Leader: Grover Cleveland and the 
Democratic Party. In addition, Dr. 
Merrill contributed "The Supreme 
Court and Economic Policy, 1877- 
1914" in the revised edition of Prob- 
lems in American History, edited by R. 
W. Leopold and Arthur Link (Prentice- 
Hall, 1957). 

In addition to their campus teaching 
duties, the History staff has carried a 
major responsibility in connection with 
the off-campus and overseas programs. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Egbert F. Tingley 

TRAINING IN INDIANA 

Army Private Philip N. Steel, Jr., '56, 
is receiving on-the-job training in fi- 
nance under the Reserve Forces Act 
program at Fort Benjamin Harrison, 
Indiana. Steel received basic combat 
training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. 

He was employed by the Swiss Jewel 
Company and the Herman D. Steel 
Company, Philadelphia, before enter- 
ing the Army. While at the University, 
he was a member of Alpha Epsilon Pi 
fraternity. 

ATTENDS INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR 

Each summer the American Friends 
Service Committee organizes Interna- 
tional Seminars, for students. These 
seminars take place overseas as well as 
in this country. The theme of this 
year's seminar was: "An interdepend- 
ent world: The effect of national con- 
ditions in international actions." 

This summer, Abraham I. Salome, a 
Dutch graduate student in the Depart- 
ment of Geography, participated in the 
seminar held in Sedonia, Arizona. Here, 
in the beautiful Oak Creek Canyon, 30 
students from 18 different countries met, 
in August, for four weeks. Most of the 
foreign students had been at American 
universities for one year. 

After introductions by specialists, in 
their fields, the topic was discussed 
from the anthropological, the political, 
the economical and the ethical point of 
view. The general conclusion was that 
the world situation, at the present, is far 
from desirable. American participants 
and, to a lesser degree, the West Euro- 
peans thought the threat of Russian 
Communism the main cause of world 
tension. The seminar members from 
Asia and Africa, however, emphasized 
the fact that hunger and discrimination 
are the root of all problems occurring 
at the present. 

Besides the general discussion topic 
other problems were discussed: for in- 
stance, the education systems, as found 
in the different countries. During the 
so-called nationality evenings the stu- 
dents introduced their country to the 
group. Several interesting trips in the 
area were made. Old Indian cliff dwell- 



32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ings, the ghost town of Jerome, the 
Grand Canyon of the Colorado and the 
Hopi villages (where the Hopi snake 
dance took place) were visited. In- 
formal discussions and recreational ac- 
tivities contributed also greatly to the 
success of the seminar. 

The International problems were not 
solved by the group, but they all went 
home, or back to their universities, 
with the feeling of having learned some- 
thing about each other, each other's 
countries, the United States and 
Arizona. 

GUEST SPEAKER AT CONFERENCE 

A guest speaker for the second day 
of the ninth annual Office Management 
Conference held at the University 
October 24, 25, and 26 was Miss Phyl- 
lis Brown. 

Miss Brown, currently Editor in the 
Associate Membership Division of the 
Research Institute of America, is an 
expert in problems of human relations 
on the job. Business managers, ranging 
from supervisors to company presi- 
dents, take her advice on such ques- 
tions as how to encourage the discour- 
aged employee, how to correct a 
subordinate, how to handle a woman 
employee. One of her most famous 
reports, "How to Handle Women," has 
proved of enormous help to supervisors 
and personnel directors throughout the 
country. 

Miss Brown spoke on "Dealing with 
People Effectively" with particular ref- 
erence to women employees. After the 
technical presentation, the Conferees 
had an opportunity to discuss cases re- 
lated to the subject in small round 
tables which were followed by a sum- 
mary of various viewpoints by Miss 
Brown at the close of the session. 

Under the general chairmanship of 
Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, the Conference 
was sponsored by the University's Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administra- 
tion in cooperation with the Area Three 
Chapters of the National Office Man- 
agement Association. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Gardner P. H. Foley 
Kryle W. Preis 



DR. COLLINS IS 
PHARMACIST-DENTIST-PHYSICIAN 

Dr. Clarence E. Collins, '97, of Cris- 
field, Md., is probably the only alumnus 
who possesses certificates issued by the 



State Boards for three professions: 
Pharmacy, Dentistry and Medicine 
Born in Laurel, Del., in 1872, Dr. ( ol- 
lins attended the National College of 
Pharmacy and passed the Maryland 
Board of Pharmacy in 1895. In 1897 
he received the D.D.S. degree from the 
University of Maryland. For two years 
he practiced in (risliekl. Prom 1899 
to 1902 he was a Demonstrator on the 
Faculty of his alma mater. In 1902 he 
received the M.D. degree from the 
University of Maryland and began the 
practice of medicine in Crisficld, where 
he still practices at the age of eighty- 
five. Dr. Collins has been part-time 
Health Officer of Crisfield since 1910. 
From 1928 to 1946 he was associated 
with the U.S.P.H.S. Since 1940 he has 
been associated with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration. He was President of the 
Chamber of Commerce (1912-24), 
President of the Red Cross of Somer- 
set County (1920-32), and a member 
of the City Council (1914-18). In 
1934, Dr. Collins began his research 
with the aloe vera plant which his son 
found growing wild in the Florida 
Everglades. He discovered that juice 
from the plant's leaves contains valu- 
able therapeutic elements. After long 
experimentation Dr. Collins made an 
ointment (Alovera) that is now used 
extensively in the treatment of all kinds 
of burns, especially those resulting from 
overexposure to x-rays and radium. 

MACKAY PAST MAINE PRESIDENT 

Dr. George W. MacKay, '00, who, 
at the age of eighty-one, practices in 
Millinocket, Me., was President of the 
Maine Dental Society in 1916-17. A 
Fellow of the American College of 
Dentists (1938), Dr. MacKay was a 
member of the Maine Board of Dental 
Examiners for ten years. He began 
practice in Millinocket following his 
graduation. 

HARPIN: DENTISTRY AND MUSIC 

Dr. Adelard Harpin, '98, of Worces- 
ter, Mass., has been a dental truant 
of the first order. Besides his profes- 
sional interests, he has participated to 
a very impressive extent in civic activi- 
ties and in the field of music. For twelve 
years he was Commissioner of Parks and 
Recreation of Worcester; he also served 
for twelve years as a Trustee of the 
Worcester Trade High School. Dr. 
Harpin has sung in all the principal 
cities of the United States and Canada. 
For a half century he was a Choir 
Director in the churches of Worcester. 
He achieved wide recognition in musi- 
cal circles by his work as organizer 
(Continued on next page) 




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Telephone: W Arfield 3-8500 



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and Director of the Gounod Male 
Quartette and as organizer and Direc- 
tor of the Philharmonic Choral Society 
(450 members). 

MARTIN IS PAST RHODE ISLAND PRESIDENT 

Dr. Henry A. Martin, B.C.D.S., '05, 
was President of the Rhode Island State 
Dental Society in 1925-26. A native of 
Newport, he has practiced in that city 
since his graduation. Dr. Martin was 
Vice-President of the Newport Dental 
Society for ten years and was Grand 
Knight of his Knights of Columbus 
council in 1913. He has supplemented 
his important professional activities by 
participating also in important local 
civic activities: member of the Plan- 
ning Board for ten years, member of 
the Board of Tax Assessors for five 
years, Chairman of the Board of Tax 
Appeals for four years, and Dental 
Inspector, Board of Health for thirty- 
eight years. 

PAST GRAND MASTER OF S.E.D. 
FRATERNITY 

Dr. Daniel D. Schwartz, '36, who 
practices in Paterson and Little Falls, 
N. J., is the immediate Past National 
Grand Master of Sigma Epsilon Delta 
fraternity. He had been Master of the 
New Jersey Graduate Chapter in 1948. 
Dr. Schwartz has also served as Chan- 
cellor of the Knights of Pythias, Presi- 
dent of the Passaic County Council for 
the Improvement of School Health 
Services, President of the Paterson Club 
Leaders, President of the New Jersey 
Club Leaders Association, and Presi- 
dent of the United Jersey Verein. Dur- 
ing the World War Dr. Schwartz was 
in the Army Air Force, 1943-46, and 
was separated with the rank of Captain. 

ENGLANDER CONNECTICUT STATE 
PRESIDENT 

Dr. Jesse J. Englander, '32, of Bridge- 
port, is President of the Connecticut 
State Dental Association (1957-58). 
Dr. Englander is a Past President of 
the Bridgeport Dental Association 
(1943-44) and the Probus Civic Club 
(1946-47). In 1946 he was elected 
National President of Probus. He served 
on the Board of Governors of the State 
Association from 1950 to 1955. He 
has made a fine contribution in the 
field of dental literature as Editor of 
the Journal of the Connecticut State 
Dental Association (1945-50) and of 
the New England Dental Journal, 
(1950-51). Dr. Englander is a member 
of Alpha Omega, Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon, and Gorgas Odontological 
Society. 



34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



1MONEKR IN ULTRASONICS 

Dr. Robert H. Brotman, '22, of Bal- 
timore, has pioneered in the use of 
ultrasonics in dentistry. He is the 
official investigator for the use of Cavi- 
tron in Maryland. At the 1956 meet- 
ing for the Maryland State Dental 
Association he gave a clinic on the uses 
of ultrasonics in preparations. Through- 
out his career Dr. Brotman has been 
an important contributor in the field 
of lay education. He has contributed 
articles for the lay reader to several 
national magazines, and his Let's Look 
at Your Teeth has achieved wide dis- 
tribution. The list of high offices held 
by Dr. Brotman reflects a large sphere 
of interests: President of the Baltimore 
Alumni Chapter of Alpha Omega, 
President of the Ritchie Civic Club, 
Noble Grand of the I.O.O.F., Chair- 
man of the A.Z.A. organizations in the 
Fifth District, and Chairman of the 
Beth Jacob School and Center. Dr. 
Brotman is the father of Dr. I. Norton 
Brotman, '36, and the brother of the 
late Dr. A. Alfred Brotman, '41. 

SPOON ON BOWMAN GRAY FACULTY 

Dr. Riley E. Spoon, Jr., '43, (March), 
of Winston Salem, N. C, has 
served since 1946 as Instructor in Den- 
tistry at the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine. Dr. Spoon is Past President 
of the Second District Dental Society 
and of the District Officers Conference 
of the North Carolina Dental Society. 
He has presented papers and clinics 
before North Carolina local, district and 
state meetings. Dr. Spoon served in the 
Army Dental Corps, 1943-46. 

CLENDENIN PAST PRESIDENT OF 
D. C. SOCIETY 

Dr. George B. Clendenin, '29, of 
Bethesda, Md., is a Past President of 
the District of Columbia Dental Society, 
Past Master of his Masonic lodge, and 
Past President of the Bethesda Rotary 
Club. Dr. Clendenin is a Fellow of the 
American College of Dentists and a 
member of the Maryland State Board 
of Dental Examiners. 

PAST NORTH CAROLINA PRESIDENT 

Dr. Linus M. Edwards, '07, of Dur- 
ham, N. C, was President of the North 
Carolina Dental Society, 1934-35. Dr. 
Edwards is a fellow of the American 
College of Dentists. 

MCGRAIL COMBINES TWO CAREERS 

Dr. Clement J. McGrail, '23, of New 
Haven, Conn., is undoubtedly one of 
the most businesslike men in the dental 
profession. He also must be one of 
(Continued on page 39) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 




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35 



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By Hazel Hatch Goff 

If the recent visit of Queen Elizabeth 
to our country gave you the yen to 
travel — or if (like us) you just don't 
like cold weather and long for the 
sunny climes — then this is the time 
to vacation in the many, many play- 
grounds of the south — or of the 
world! 

A friend of ours — each year — takes 
one of these exciting "guided tours" 
arranged in detail for you by the 
travel bureaus — no reservations to 
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Cozy, intimate bar, serving 
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Continental Dining Room 

for elegant dining 

Fleur-de-Lis Lounge 

Open for luncheon & dinner 

Cafe' de Paris 

Sidewalk cafe' 

MISCHANTON'S 

Easlpoinl Shopping Center ot Open nightly til 2 a.m. 
Northpoint Rd. & Eastern Ave. ample parking 
ATwater 8-0130 



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Sometimes just a business trip or 
a long weekend can break the mono- 
tony of a winter in the north and be 
an uplift in helping sustain us until 
spring arrives again with all of the 
beauty of new life and growth to 
Maryland. 

Now, if your fancy is captured by 
a travel folder from abroad, as one 
of the ever increasing number of 
travelers to Europe, and no limit to 
your itinerary — if time and money 
are no object, there are hundreds of 
tours to choose from. 

Traveling Europe in 1958 you 
might be interested in the Ski Jump- 
ing and World Championships to be 
held in Finland in March; the famous 
Bicycle Races in France in July; Tulip 
Time in the Netherlands in May; the 
Irish Derby (for racing fans) in June; 
Opera, Concerts, etc. when the City 
of Munich celebrates its 800th An- 
niversary; Ice Hockey in Norway; 
and it seems (from the folders) that 
every country is holding a Festival of 
something or other to attract the 
tourist to their land in 1958. 

Then there are the famous night 
spots, the magnificent cathedrals, the 
wonderful beaches — natural play- 
grounds with gayety planned for you; 
celebrated promenades; gracious hos- 
pitality at fabulous hostelries and, of 
course, choicest foods. 

But, to get back to America, the 
advertisements vie with one another 
to tell us where one can find the most 
elaborate hotels, the most luxuriously 
appointed resorts, the most exotic 
foods, the most restful or the gayest 
of clubs. 




Wonder 

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CUSTOM MADE SLIP COVERS & DRAPERIES 

8571 Georgia Ave. - Silver Spring, Md. 

JUniper 9-9619 
Open Monday, Thursday & Friday Nights 



36 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



/a 



men 



Wherever we go there'll be music, 
and music lovers are always happy to 
rind a Chickering piano for they know 
that means the very finest in piano 
making. 

KRANZ WILLIS MUSIC at 327 
NORTH CHARLES STREET, is one 
of the most famous names on the 
street, Maryland's largest and best 
stocked music store. One of the most 
valuable aids to the customer is John 
Jacobs with 40 years experience in 
the sheet music department and well 
qualified to help you in selecting the 
right music for your particular needs. 

The piano department carries a full 
line of grands, spinettes and consoles 
to fit every need, plus a consulting 
service to help you and advise you 
concerning care and upkeep or techni- 
cal problems. The department is un- 
der the managership of Denny Shaw, 
who for many years was a consulting 
engineer to several piano manufactur- 
ers and a master craftsman piano 
technician. 

If the traveler in the seat next to 
you wants to talk — and you just don't 
feel like talking — take along a book to 
read and you'll never be lonesome. 
Somehow a good book is always a 
good traveling companion. 

Books that are good reading this 
month from COKESBURY BOOK 
STORE, 516 NORTH CHARLES 
STREET, include these: 



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Tel: ME 8-4000 




Best American Short Stories of 1957 

House Party — Virginia Rowens 

Saturday Review Treasury 

The Long RifU — Stewart Edward 
White 

Story of Walt Disney — Diana Disney 
Miller 

His-Her Bedside Companion — Nor- 
man M. Lobsenz 

Attorney for the Damned — Arthur 
Weinberg 

Ayn Rand 

Alone — Vladimir 



A tlas Shrugged- 

Not by Bread 

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While we play — or vacation — or 
just rest, let's not forget the less 
fortunate — the ill, or those whose 
lives are filled with cares and sorrows 
due to the ravages of disease. 

Charles Perry McCormick, Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents of the 
University of Maryland, Baltimore in- 
dustrialist and pioneer in management 



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37 




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methods, as President of McCormick 
& Company, has been named Na- 
tional Chairman of the 1958 Heart 
Fund Campaign. The campaign is to 
be conducted throughout the country 
during February for the support of 
research, education and community 
service of the association. 

The oft-quoted remark, "Give a 
busy man the EXTRA JOB and it 
will be well done" is rightly true in 
the case of Mr. McCormick, and be- 
cause he gives of himself so gener- 
ously, he will have full support of his 
co-workers. 



Another campaign which will re- 
quire our efforts during the coming 
month is the 1958 March of Dimes 
which officially opened on January 2, 
marking the twentieth year in which 
the public has joined with the Na- 
tional Foundation for Infantile Paral- 
ysis to fight polio and its after-effects. 

Former U. S. Senator George L. 
Radcliffe, is chairman of the March of 
Dimes in Maryland. 

Outlining this year's campaign, Mr. 
Radcliffe says that "We must face 
more than one challenge this year, 
and all of them are of vital import- 
ance. Our slogan for 1958, "Help 
Them Live Again," tells its own story 
of the 90,000 polio victims on 



crutches, in braces, in wheelchairs and 
in iron lungs." 

He points out that there are still 
37,000,000 Americans in the polio 
age group who have not yet been 
protected fom paralytic polio by Salk 
vaccinations, and that March of 
Dimes funds will also be used this year 
for the rehabilitation of polio victims 
and for research into science and 
medicine. 

Other March of Dimes programs 
include the National Foundation's 
epidemic and emergency service, 
which makes available equipment 
and medical personnel to stricken 
areas, and its program of research, 
which finances scientific investigation 
into the cause and treatment of para- 
lytic polio through grants to labora- 
tories and medical schools throughout 
the nation. 

The 1958 March of Dimes con- 
tinues through January 31. 



give to the 

MARCH of 
DIMES 




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WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Free Parking after 6 P.M. 



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The Newest French Restaurant 
in Georgetown 



Closed Sundays 
FE 3-6440 



Chef: Eugene Bast/sse 
WISCONSIN & M STS., N.W. 

Free Parking for Lunch and Dinners 



38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



52nd ANNIVERSARY 



1906 




1958 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 



Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 



PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25. Md. CUrtis 7-1112 



Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
mannerl Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefs! 

Nate's and Leon's 

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College of 
EDUCATION 

M. Marjorie Mac Murray 
STUDENT NEA 

The officers for the University of 
Maryland chapter of the Student Na- 
tional Education Association this year 
are: 

President — Pat Hensley of Fort Dix, 
New Jersey. 

Vice President — Margaret Kline of 
Silver Spring, Md. 

Secretary — Joyce Cox of Bel Air, 
Maryland. 

Treasurer — Nancy Overton of Uni- 
versity Park, Maryland. 

Faculty Advisors — Professors F. 
Schneider and W. Matson. 

At their opening meeting, Dean An- 
derson and Dean Denemark spoke. 
Other speakers this semester include Dr. 
James Hymes, newly appointed Head of 
the Department of Childhood Educa- 
tion at the University of Maryland, and 
Mr. Berwick who is the new Director 
of the Maryland State Teachers Asso- 
ciation's division of Future Teachers of 
America. Other activities include a 
Christmas party for a ward at Chil- 
dren's Hospital, a panel discussion of 
students who are student teaching, at- 
tendance at the state convention in 
Salisbury and a tour of the NEA head- 
quarters building in Washington. 

DR. KEEDY JOINS STAFF 

Dr. M. L. Keedy joined the staff of 
the University in September, 1957, as 
Associate Director of the Junior High 
School Mathematics Research Study. 
Dr. Keedy is a mathematician with a 
special interest in the problems of 
mathematical education. He received 
his B.S. degree from the University of 
Chicago, his M.A. and Ph.D. from the 
University of Nebraska. He has taught 
in the public schools and has served on 
(Continued on next page) 




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the staffs of the Illinois Institute of 
Technology, Nebraska State Teachers 
College, North Dakota State College, 
and the University of Nebraska. Dur- 
ing the year just past he served as a 
consultant to high school teachers of 
mathematics and science in the state of 
Nebraska, in the Science Teaching Im- 
provement Program, which is an activi- 
ty of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. In addition 
to his duties with the Junior High 
School Mathematics Research Study, he 
teaches courses in mathematics in the 
University of Maryland mathematics 
department, and will work with student 
teachers in the areas of mathematics 
and science. 

Dr. Keedy's appointment brings him 
to the land of his ancestors. His grand- 
father emigrated, as a boy. to Nebraska, 
from Keedysville. Maryland. Dr. Keedy 
indicates that he has not yet visited 
that small Maryland town, but that he 
intends to do so when the pressures of 
becoming oriented ease a bit. 

JACOBSEN JOINS INDUSTRIAL 
EDUCATION STAFF 

Dr. Eckhard Jacobsen recently joined 
the Industrial Education Department's 
staff with a rank of Associate Profes- 
sor. Dr. Jacobsen earned his doctor of 
philosophy degree at the University of 
Connecticut. His undergraduate work 
was done at the State Teachers College, 
Oswego, New York. 

Dr. Jacobsen's major responsibilities 
include courses in drafting and design. 
Prior to his coming to the University, 
he taught at the State Teachers College 
at Fitchburg. Massachusetts. Dr. Jacob- 
sen comes to his new position with a 
rich background in teacher education, 
public school work, and industrial ex- 
perience. 

Dr. Jacobsen is married and has four 
children. 

DR. PATRICK APPOINTED 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick has been ap- 
pointed as State Chairman for Mary- 
land for the national organization. Fu- 
ture Business Leaders of America. Mrs. 
Jane H. O'Neill of the College of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration has 
been appointed as Associate Chairman. 
The FBLA is actively sponsored by 
the United Business Education Associa- 
tion which is a department of the Na- 
tional Education Association and col- 
leges in the 48 states, District of Co- 
lumbia, Hawaii, and Cuba. These chap- 
ters are organized by states and indi- 
vidual possessions into State Chapters 
of FBLA who have their own state 



40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



officers and conduct state conventions 
each spring. 

The Maryland Slate Chapter of 
FBLA will hold their first annual con- 
vention on the University of Maryland 
campus, April 25 and 2b, 1958. 

The purposes of FBI. A are to develop 
competent business leaders, strengthen 
the confidence of young men and 
women in themselves and their work, 
create more interest and understanding 
in the intelligent choice of business 
occupations, participate in worthy un- 
dertakings for the improvement of busi- 
ness in the community, encourage and 
practice thrift, improve and establish 
standards for entrance into business oc- 
cupations, and finally, to encourage 
improvement in scholarship, develop 
character, train for useful citizenship, 
and foster patriotism. 

Each local and state chapter conducts 
a program whereby recognition is given 
these young people for outstanding 
leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. 

LEMBACH TEACHES WORKSHOP 

Professor John Lembach is now 
teaching an art education workshop for 
elementary school teachers of Balti- 
more and vicinity every Wednesday 
evening from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Howard 
Senior High School. 



DR. HYMES LECTURES 

Dr. James L. Hymes, Jr., Chairman 
of the Childhood Education Depart- 
ment spoke to the following groups: 

Oct. 3 — Baltimore Association for 
Pre-school Education 

Oct. 22 — Radnor Township, Pa. 
Public Schools 

Oct 28 — Potomac Association of 
Cooperative Teachers 

Oct. 31— Maryland State Confer- 
ence of Pupil Personnel 
Workers 

Nov. 1 — Founders Day, Mills Col- 
lege of Education 

Nov. 14 — Montgomery County 
A.C.E. 

Nov. 16 — Tidewater Pre-school As- 
sociation and Peninsula 
Mental Health Associa- 
tion, Hampton, Virginia 



LEADER AT SEMINAR 

Mrs. Margaret A. Stant, Assistant 
Professor of the Childhood Education 
Department, was a leader of a seminar 
on kindergarten teaching at a workshop 
at Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 

(Continued on next page) 



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DR. MALEY IS CONSULTANT 

Dr. Donald Maley was a speaker and 
consultant at the Fayette County Teach- 
ers' Institute held on September 27 at 
Connellsville, Pennsylvania. Dr. Maley 
spoke on the topic "How Can Indus- 
trial Arts and Vocational Education 
Teachers Do a Creditable Job of Teach- 
ing a Class with Students of Various 
Levels of Ability?" This marks the 
third straight year that Dr. Maley has 
appeared before similar groups in vari- 
ous parts of Pennsylvania. This year's 
talk was highlighted with an effective 
array of visual aids developed especially 
for the topic. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

Col. O. H. Saunders '10 
A. Lawrence Guess '51 



DRS. HUFF AND REID ATTEND SCHOOL 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff and Dr. Luther 
J. Reid attended the One Day School 
for Chemical Engineering Teachers held 
Friday, October 18, 1957 at the Daniel 
Boone Hotel in Charleston, West Vir- 
ginia under the auspices of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers. 
The topic of the school was Modern 
Ammonia Synthesis. The session in- 
cluded a plant inspection trip to the 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Com- 
pany ammonia plant at Belle, West 
Virginia. 

EARNS ADVANCED DEGREE 

Mr. Harry E. Hughes, Jr., B.S.M.E., 
'51, was recently awarded an M.S.M.E. 
by Lehigh University. He received the 
degree during the 79th Founder's Day 
exercises of Lehigh University held 
October, 1957 in Packer Memorial 
Church on the University campus. 

DEAN MAVIS CO-AUTHORS PAPER 

A paper on destructive impulse load- 
ing of reinforced concrete beams by 
Dean F. T. Mavis and Dr. M. J. 
Greaves, published in the September 
Journal of the American Concrete In- 
stitute reports an extensive study by the 
authors of the resistance of structural 
elements to heavy blast forces and de- 
structive impulse loads. The research 
has also been summarized in a sound 
motion picture. 

DONOHUE DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE 

William J. Donohue, Jr., '37, long as- 
sociated with the design and develop- 



42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ment of fuses and other weapon com- 
ponents at the Naval Ordnance Labora- 
tory, has received many commenda- 
tions and been granted a number of 
patents for his designs. He also holds 
the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service 
Award. 

FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION 

The scope of activities of the Fire 
Service Extension Department of the 
College of Engineering in the field of 
the control and reduction of fire losses 
has recently increased in tempo. This 
is by means of an intensification of a 
program to conduct short courses con- 
cerned with fire prevention and fire 
protection at selected locations through- 
out Maryland. One such was held at 
New Windsor in September and an- 
other at Cambridge in October. The 
attendance and interest in this type 
activity serves to emphasize that this 
public service program of the Uni- 
versity renders a worthwhile service in 
the field of humanitarian fire safety. 

COMMITTEE MEETS AT MARYLAND 

The University was the scene of a 
meeting of national import in the field 
of fire safety November 5-8, 1957. 
This was the meeting of the Commit- 
tee on Rural Fire Protection of the 
National Fire Protection Association. 
Included on the agenda was considera- 
tion of standards of primary concern 
and application to rural fire safety. The 
present trends in de-centralization of 
industry and population has greatly in- 
creased the significance of the fire prob- 
lems in other than urban areas. This 
committee under the Chairmanship of 
Mr. Robert C. Byrus, Director of the 
! Fire Service Extension Department 
brought to the campus representatives 
from approximately twenty states, repre- 
: senting industry, educational institu- 
i tions, insurance groups, and the fire 
) service. This committee functions in 
both a technical advisory and educa- 
1 tional capacity in active cooperation 
with the Department of Agriculture. 

\ PROFESSOR SCHULTZ-GRUNOW LECTURES 

Professor F. Schultz-Grunow of the 
Institute of Applied Mathematics in the 

; Technical University of Aachen lec- 
tured on Friday afternoon, October 1 1, 

' at the University on the topic "On 

I Mechanisms Producing Longitudinal 
Waves in Boundary Layers". The lec- 
ture was held at 3 p.m. in Room 315 

I of the Mathematics Building under the 

auspices of the Institute for Fluid 

Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 




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The lecture was a sequel to his paper 
on the same topic presented before the 
12th Congress for Theoretical and Ap- 
plied Mechanics in Brussels, 1956 and 
is related closely to research on bound- 
ary layer transition initiated several 
years ago at the University of Maryland 
by Dr. Theodore Theodorsen and car- 
ried on by Professors F. Hama and 
J. R. Weske of the Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

Professor F. Schultz-Grunow holds 
the Chair of Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics and is the Director of the 
Institute for Applied Mechanics at the 
Technical University of Aachen (West 
Germany's largest Technical Universi- 
ty), received his scientific training at 
Munich and Goettingen. He was a 
member of the research staff of Pro- 
fessor Prandtl's Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics Research and ranks among 
the outstanding representatives of the 
Prandtl School of Aerodynamics Re- 
search. 

He is a prominent scientific figure 
in Germany and throughout Europe as 
one of the younger leaders of the 
(German) Society for Applied Mathe- 
matics and Mechanics (GAMM). 

Professor Schultz-Grunow also is a 
Fellow of the Institute of the Aeronau- 
tical Sciences. 

BAILEY DOING GRADUATE WORK 

William R. Bailey, M.E. '50, is doing 
graduate work in Economics at the 
University of Pennsylvania. Since grad- 
uation he worked for four years with 
the Brown Instrument Division of Min- 
neapolis-Honeywell in Philadelphia; 
two years as a Naval Reservist at Nor- 
folk during the Korean affair; one year 
with a small consulting firm and recent- 
ly he has been research engineer with 
the Lukens Steel Company. He writes: 
"Both engineering and life have been 
good to me: I married a Philadelphia 
girl in 1951 and we now have a four 
month old boy." 

DR. LONG ELECTED SECRETARY 

Dr. Ralph H. Long, Jr., of the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Department was re- 
cently elected Secretary of the Wash- 
ington Section of the American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers. Assistant 
Professor Harold D. Gather was ap- 
pointed Chairman of the Student Af- 
fairs Committee for the Section. 

DR. GEE APPOINTED 

Dr. Edwin A. Gee, Ph.D. 1948, Chemi- 
cal Engineering, of E. I. duPont de 
Nemours & Company, Pigments De- 



44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



partmcnt, has been advanced from his 
important technical supervisory re- 
sponsibilities to Assistant Director of 
Sales. 

DR. HUFF TO PRESIDENT'S CONFERENCE 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Chairman of the 
Department of Chemical Engineering, 
was an invited delegate to President 
Eisenhower's Conference on Technical 
Research and Distribution for the Bene- 
fit of Small Business. This conference 
met in Washington, September 23-25, 
inclusive. The impact of engineering 
and applied science upon business has 
been explosive. The conference ex- 
plored ways and means for extending 
to the small organization the benefits, 
hitherto available chiefly to large busi- 
ness. Dr. Huff has had extensive ex- 
perience in industrial research and con- 
sultation. 

DR. RAESTON RETIRES 

Dr. Oliver C. Ralston, a member of 
the University's Advisory Committee 
on Metallurgy in the Department of 
Chemical Engineering retired October 
1st from his duties as Chief Metallurgist 
in the United States Bureau of Mines. 
His associates and friends tendered him 
a farewell reception on September 19th 
at the Hotel Burlington in Washington, 
D. C. Among the many attending was 
Dr. Huff. 

ATTEND SYMPOSIUM 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Chairman, and 
Dr. Luther J. Reid, Assistant Professor 
of the Department of Chemical Engi- 
neering were invited by the E. I. du- 
Pont de Nemours and Company to 
attend an educational symposium on the 
catalytic synthesis and large scale manu- 
facture of ammonia held Friday, Octo- 
ber 18th, at Charleston, West Virginia. 

J. H. RUMBAUGH RETURNS 

Jeffrey H. Rumbaugh, B.S. in Electrical 
Engineering, 1957, has returned to the 
University as Instructor in Electrical 
Engineering. 

NESLINE TEACHES AT M.I.T. 

Frederick W. Nesline. B.S. in Electrical 
Engineering, 1951, received the Ph.D. 
from Yale in 1956. At present he is an 
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 

PETTIT REPORTS TO EGLIN 

Charles G. Pettit IV, B.S. in Electrical 
Engineering, 1957, recently reported to 
the Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. 
Mr. Pettit was commissioned into the 
Air Force at the June commencement. 
(Continued on next page) 



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CAPT. LUCE RETIRES 

Capt. Robert F. Luce, who retired 
July 1, 1957, taught surveying in the 
Civil Engineering Department for the 
past 9 years. He received his B.S. de- 
gree in Engineering from the Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale University in 
1910. He served in various technical 
and administrative capacities with the 
U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey from 
1910 to 1947 when he went on inactive 
status with a rank equivalent to Cap- 
tain in the Navy. Capt. Luce is a 
U. S. Licensed Marine Officer, Master, 
Unlimited, on any ocean. He lives at 
3130 Wisconsin Avenue, Washington, 

D. C. "Smooth sailing" Captain. 

TWO JOIN STAFF 

Two new instructors. Messrs. Robert L. 
Pumphrey and Raymond J. Krizek, 
joined the staff of the Department of 
Civil Engineering on Sept. 1, 1957. Mr. 
Pumphrey received a B.S. degree in 
Civil Engineering at the University of 
Maryland in 1953. Prior to coming to 
Maryland he worked with the U. S. 
Geological Survey, Thieblot Aircraft 
Co., and the Washington District of the 
Corps of Engineers. In 1954 and 1955 
he served as a lieutenant in the U. S. 
Air Force at Boiling Field. Mr. Pum- 
phrey is married and has one daughter. 
He lives at 3032 Gumwood Drive, Uni- 
versity Hills, Maryland. Mr. Krizek 
received a B.E. degree in Civil Engi- 
neering at Johns Hopkins University in 
1954. He worked for the J. E. Greiner 
Co., Glenn L. Martin Co., and the Bal- 
timore District of the Corps of Engi- 
neers and served in the Army at Ft. 
Belvoir, Va., from 1955 to 1957. Mr. 
Krizek is single and lives at 9115 49th 
Ave., College Park, Md. 

DR. BLACKBURN EMPLOYED BY STATE 

Dr. J. B. Blackburn, Department of 
Civil Engineering, was employed by the 
Maryland State Roads Commission this 
past summer. His work involved the 
design of experiments for studies of 
problems related to highway design. 

CONSULTANT ON FOUNDATION 
PROBLEMS 

E. S. Barber, Department of Civil En- 
gineering, worked as consultant to the 
U. S. Bureau of Public Roads on 
foundation problems this past summer. 
He made several inspection trips to 
Louisiana, North Dakota, Minnesota, 
Iowa and Missouri to advise on design 
of foundations for Interstate Highways. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING ALUMNI 

Gerald L. Longanecker, '54, 7604 23rd 
Ave., Hyattsville, Md., is working for 



the Nuclear-Products Division, ACF 
Industries in Washington, D. C. 

Fedon Dimitriades, '57, is working 
for the Louisiana State Department of 
Health in New Orleans. His address is 
P. O. Box 630. 

John Pavlides, '57, is now serving in 
the Navy with the C.E.C. Corps, Dis- 
trict Public Works Office, Charleston, 
South Carolina. 

Paul Manoukian, '57, is serving in 
the Army with the Unit Signal Survey 
Team at Ft. Meade, Md. 

Emerick Toth, '57, is now working 
with the U. S. Geological Survey at 
College Park, Md. This past summer 
he toured Europe. 

Bob Mathey, '51, 5309 38th Ave., 
Hyattsville, Md., is with the Bureau 
of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Russell H. Davis, '57, was scheduled 
to complete eight weeks of basic com- 
bat training September 28 under the 
Reserve Forces Act program at Fort 
Knox, Ky. He previously worked as a 
civil engineer for the J. E. Greiner Co. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Mrs. June Wilbur 



NEW FACULTY MEMBERS 

New members of the faculty are Mrs. 
Norma Compton in Textiles and Cloth- 
ing, Marjorie Jones in Practical Art, 
Helen Stephens in Home Management, 
Dr. Virginia Sidwell and Mrs. Iva Ham- 
mell in Foods and Nutrition. 

PROFESSOR CROW ON CIVIL DEFENSE 
COUNCIL 

Professor Jane Crow, President of the 
Maryland Home Economics Associa- 
tion, is representing the Home Econom- 
ics Associations in Civil Defense Region 
2 on the Women's Civil Defense Coun- 
cil. Region 2 includes Delaware. Wash- 
ington, D. C, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, 
Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia and 
Maryland. Miss Crow is also on the 
National Organizing Committee for the 
International Congress of Home Eco- 
nomics meeting in the United States 
in 1958. 

Other faculty members who are ac- 
tive participants in the Maryland Home 
Economics Association at the present 
time are Faye Mitchell who is Treas- 
urer, June Wilbur who is Chairman of 
Consumer Interests and Ruth Parker 
who is Co-Chairman of Membership 
Promotion. 



46 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



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Miss HODGSON EXHIBITS \ki WORK 

Miss Eleanor Hodgson oi the Depart 
ment of Practical An has recently had 
exhihits of her work shown at the ( hi- 
cago Institute of Ait with the Midwest 
Designer-Craftsman Exhibit and at the 
Smithsonian Institution with the Wash 
ington, I). C. Kiln Club Exhibit. Dur- 
ing the past year she completed work 
for a master of line arts degree from 
Cranbrook Academy of Art. 

RECEIVES ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 

Mrs. Richard E. Coss, formerly Betty 
Schmidt and a graduate of the College 
of Home Economics, received the 
American Gas Association Home Serv- 
ice Achievement Award during the 
annual convention of the American Gas 
Association in St. Louis, Missouri, on 
October 8. The award, sponsored by 
McCall's magazine, included a bronze 
plaque and $200.00. Mrs. Coss received 
the award for outstanding public serv- 
ice to Hagerstown homemakers. 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



ANNUAL BANQUET AND ELECTION 

The annual banquet of the Law School 
Alumni Association will be held on 
Saturday evening, March 29, 1958, at 
7 p.m. at the Sheraton Belvedere Hotel 
in Baltimore. As usual, invited guests 
of honor will include the Unites States 
Senators for Maryland, federal judges, 
Governor Theodore R. McKeldin, 
Judges of the Court of Appeals of 
Maryland, the Attorney General of 
Maryland, the United States District 
Attorney for Maryland (our out-going 
President Leon H. A. Pierson of the 
Class of 1923), and President Elkins. 
Members of the graduating class of the 
Law School are also invited as guests, 
and honors and awards will be pre- 
sented by Dean Roger Howell. 

The annual election of officers will 
be held on this occasion, and the Nom- 
inating Committee, appointed by Presi- 
dent Leon H. A. Pierson, has presented 
to the Secretary the following list of 
officials for the year 1957-58: 

President — Benjamin Rosenstock, 
Esq.. '25 — Frederick 

First Vice-President — Hon. Emory 
H. Niles, '25 — Baltimore 

Second Vice-President — Hon. Lay- 
man J. Redden, '34 — Denton 
(Continued on next page) 




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Third Vice-President — Mary Arabi- 
an, '44 — Baltimore. 

Secretary-Treasurer — G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, '29 — Baltimore 

Executive Committee: 

Rignal Baldwin. Esq., '27 — Baltimore 

Thomas M. Berry, Esq., '40 — Cum- 
berland 

Clayton C. Carter, Esq., '46 — Cen- 
treville 

Hamilton P. Fox, Jr.. Esq.. '47 — - 
Salisbury 

J. Harold Grady, Esq., '42 — Balti- 
more 

David Harkness, Esq., '38 — Prince 
Frederick 

W. Albert Menchine, Esq.. '29 — Bal- 
timore County 

J. Hodge Smith, Esq.. '39— Rock- 
ville 

Marvin H. Smith, Esq., '41 — Denton 

Leonard Weinberg, Esq., '19 — Balti- 
more 

The Nominating Committee: 

Honorable Stanford I. Hoff. '34 — 

Chairman 
Honorable J. Harold Grady, '42 
Frederick W. Invernizzi. Esq., '35 
Herbert L. Cohen, Esq., '48 
Frederick J. Green, Jr., Esq., '48 

Any additional nominations are re- 
quired under the Constitution to be sub- 
mitted by petition signed by ten mem- 
bers and delivered to the Secretary at 
the School of Law at least 30 days 
prior to the date of the banquet. 

Each year the annual banquet and 
business meeting is the chief function 
of the Law School Alumni, and we feel 
it offers a fine opportunity to renew old 
acquaintances and have an enjoyable 
social evening together. In 1958. the 
five-year classes of 1953, 1948, 1943, 
and each fifth year theretofore will 
have special tables reserved for their 
special every-fifth-year reunion and we 
trust that these classes will begin early 
to plan for a good attendance to enjoy 
the affair and welcome the graduating 
class. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND FIFTH 

ANNUAL DRIVE 

The Fifth Annual Scholarship Fund 
Drive will be conducted by a special 
letter from the Scholarship Committee 
to all Law School Alumni, and personal 
contact through area and class repre- 
sentatives beginning in late 1957 and 
running to June. 1958. This practice of 
having an annual drive was begun five 
years ago in response to a growing 
recognition that an expanding scholar- 
ship program was a desirable, if not 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



necessary, part of maintaining the high- 
est standing of the School among other 
A-grade law schools of the country and 
a belief that many of our alumni would 
like to make this a part of their annual 
giving. To date, it has resulted in dona- 
tions sufficient to support the award of 
23 scholarships over the last four school 
years and the gradual growth of a 
sustaining fund amounting to a little 
over $8,000. The results of the Fourth 
Drive in 1956-57 show about 300 con- 
tributors and total receipts of $4,638. 
a substantial increase over the average 
of the first three drives. We trust that 
the Fifth Drive will continue this for- 
ward movement. 

HORNEY NAMED APPELLATE JUDGE 

Judge William R. Homey, LL.B. "23, 
is the newest judge on Maryland's high- 
est court. He was elevated by Gov. 
Theodore McKeldin from the Circuit 
Court to the Court of Appeals, filling 
the vacancy caused by the retirement 
of Judge Stephen R. Collins. Judge 
Horney will represent the First Appel- 
late Circuit — all of the Eastern Shore — 
on the five-member court until next 
November when he must stand for 
election to a full 15-year term. 

With the appointment. Associate 
Judge J. DeWeese Carter will be moved 
to the chief judgeship of the second 
circuit. Recommendations for a new 
associate judge for this circuit are being 
made. Chief contender is Thomas J. 
Keating, Jr., a practicing attorney of 
Centreville, Maryland, a graduate of 
the University's Law School. 

SOWERS DIRECTS PUBLIC RELATIONS 

William R. Sowers was recently ap- 
pointed Director of Public Relations of 
Coastal Foods Company. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



CHAIRMAN OF HOSPITAL DRIVE 

Dr. M. E. Strobel. of Reisterstown, 
Maryland, is serving as chairman of 
the Professional Division of the Carroll 
County General Hospital Fund Cam- 
paign for the Reisterstown-Glyndon 
area. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

An RCA-EMV-3 Electron Microscope, 
(costing approximately $27,000) has 
been installed in the Department of 
Anatomy under a $30,000 grant from 
(Continued on next page) 




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the United States Public Health Service, 
National Institute of Health. This in- 
strument will be used for cancer re- 
search and other research projects 
jointly with the Departments of 
Pathology and Microbiology. 

Dr. Frank H. J. Figge, Professor of 
Anatomy and Head of the Department 
has announced receipt of the following 
research grants: 

$10,000 for leukemia research. Dr. 
Figge, (N.I.H. National Cancer Insti- 
tute) 

$10,000 for research in the therapeutic 
effects of Porphyrins. Dr. Figge. (N.I. 
H. National Cancer Institute) 
$5,000 for research on Neurosecretions. 
Dr. Theodore F. Leveque. (N.I.H. Na- 
tional Institute of Neurological Diseases 
and Blindness) 

$5,000 for research on the anatomy of 
the lung. Dr. Vernon Krahl. (Renewal) 
$5,000 for research on dynamics of 
amniotic fluid and maternal foetal ex- 
change. Dr. Robert E. McClafferty. 
(Renewal) 

Dr. Roger H. Davidheiser was re- 
cently awarded the Ph.D degree in 
Anatomy. His thesis was entitled 
"Studies on Enzymatic Porphyrin 
Biosynthesis in Horderian Glands and 
other Tissues of Mice." Dr. Davidheiser 
will remain in the Department of 
Anatomy as Research Fellow and In- 
structor in Anatomy. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

The following papers were delivered 
this fall by members of the Department 
of Pharmacology at the John Jacob 
Abel Centennial Meeting of the Society 
of Pharmacology and Experimental 
Therapeutics at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity: 

"Estimation of Vinamar and Fluomar 
in Blood," Ruth Musser, Chung Park 
and John C. Krantz, Jr: 
"Studies on the Pharmacological Action 
of a New Series of Antispasmodics," 
Harold Bryant and John C. Krantz. Jr.; 
"Studies on the Vasodepressor Action 
of 8-Aminotheophylline." Raymond M. 
Burgison, John Hensela and John C. 
Krantz, Jr.; 

"Pharmacology of Hexarluoro-diethyl- 
ether." Alfred Ling. Edward B. Truitt 
and John C. Krantz. Jr.; 
"The Clinical Use of Hexafluoro-ethyl- 
ether in the Treatment of Mental Ill- 
ness," A. Kurland. A. Esquibet and 
John C. Krantz, Jr. 

A $25,000 grant from the United 
States Navy has been received for 
studies in toxicology. Dr. Krantz. 

A $25,000 grant from the United 
State Public Health Service, N.I.H.. for 
studies on the pharmacology of alcohol 



50 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



has been awarded to Dr. Edward B. 
Truitt. 

Dr. Raymond M. Burgison has been 
awarded a $5,000 grant for studies on 
hypotensive agents by the Brayton 
Pharmaceutical Company. Chattanooga. 
Tennessee for 1957-1958. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Dr. William H. Amberson, Professor 
of Physiology and Head of the Depart- 
ment, has returned from a sabbatical 
leave January 1 during which he con- 
ducted research at the Marine Biologi- 
cal Laboratories, Woods Hole, Massa- 
chusetts, and wrote a new college text- 
book titled, •"Outline of Vertebrate 
Physiology." 

Dr. John White and Miss Sylvia Him- 
melfarb have been awarded a three 
year grant of $8,780 per year by the 
United States Public Health Service, 
N.I.H., for research in muscle physiolo- 
gy- 
Richard H. Glasser was recently 
awarded the Ph.D degree in Physiology. 
He has been appointed Instructor in 
Physiology at the University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine. 

Dr. Dietrich C. Smith, Associate 
Dean and Dr. Frederick P. Ferguson, 
Professor of Physiology have been 
awarded a $64,000 grant from the 
United States Public Health Service, 
N.I.H., to run for four years, for re- 
search on the effects of predecompres- 
sion stress upon water and electrolyte 
distribution and renal function. 

The following papers were delivered 
at the Meeting of the American Physi- 
ological Society at Iowa City, Iowa: 
"Crystallization and Properties of Delta 
Protein, a New Fibrous Protein," John 
White and Sylvia Himmelfarb; and 
"Hypokalemia and Respiratory Alky- 
losis in Anesthetized Dogs during 
Acute Decompression Stress," Deitrich 
C. Smith and Frederick P. Ferguson. 
Dr. Henderson Irwin, class of 1912, 
whose life typifies that of the country 
doctor, was recently honored for his 
44 years of service to his home com- 
munity. Eureka, North Carolina. 

Dr. Irwin, also a leader in education, 
was honored by the dedication of a 
portrait which will be hung in the lobby 
of the Eureka school. 

A graduate of Davidson College and 
the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine, Dr. Irwin served his intern- 
ship at the University Hospital. He later 
began practice in Charlotte, North 
Carolina prior to his coming to Eureka. 
His one desire was said to practice in 
a rural community close to nature and 
humanity. 

(Continued on next page) 



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51 



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College of 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

EDWARD M. DOWNEY APPOINTED 

The appointment of Edward M. 
Downey, '52, to the public relations 
staff has been announced by J. Walter 
Thompson Company in Chicago. 

Mr. Downey is a native of College 
Park. He served as a 1st Lieutenant in 
the United States Air Force. Prior to 
joining the J. Walter Thompson staff, 
Downey was Director, Chicago Division 
of Jack Morton Productions. 

MAJOR HARRY A. SOMMER CITED BY 
ARMY 

Major Harry A. Sommer, '57, has been 
presented the Certificate of Achieve- 
ment in recognition of outstanding per- 
formance of duty as Assistant Quarter- 
master, Headquarters V Corps, from 
June 28, 1954 to January 14, 1957, 
and as Quartermaster, Headquarters V 
Corps from January 15, 1957, to May 
19, 1957 in Frankfurt, Germany. 

His citation read in part "His initia- 
tive, aggressiveness and devotion to 
duty set an example for all members of 
his organization. Major Sommer, 
through superior performance of duty, 
reflects great credit upon himself and 
the United States Army." 

The presentation was made at Fort 
Leavenworth, Kansas where the Major 
is attending the three months Associate 
Course given by the USA CGSC (U. S. 
Army Command and General Staff Col- 
lege). 

During his Army career, Major Som- 
mer has served with the 34th Infantry 
Division in Europe (January to Octo- 
ber, 1942); Korea with the 78th QM 
Base Depot (July, 1948 to July, 1949); 
and the Tokyo QM Depot, Tokyo, 
Japan (July, 1949 to June, 1950). 

Following his graduation from the 
Associate Course in December, the 
Major will resume his duties as S-4 
with Headquarters U. S. A. Military 
District South Dakota, 210 East 10th 
Street, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

BRANDEL JOINS RENSSELAER FACULTY 

Major Ralph E. Brandel, '54, is a new 
member of the faculty in Naval ROTC 
at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
Troy, New York. Major Brandel is to 
instruct the Marine Science subjects and 
will be public information officer on 
the staff of Captain Ernest W. Long- 
ton, USN, Commanding Officer of the 
unit. 



Coming to Rensselaer after complet- 
ing the nine months Amphibious War- 
fare course at Marine Corps School, 
Quantico, Virginia, Major Brandel had 
been with the 1st Marine Division for 
30 months, first in Korea and later at 
Camp Pendleton, California, where he 
was an engineer officer and operations 
officer for the 1st Engineer Battalion. 
He was Reserve Facilities Officer at 
Marine Corps Headquarters, Washing- 
ton, for three years and in that post 
was in charge of the Corps' reserve 
facilities throughout the world. Prior 
to that Major Brandel was with the 2nd 
Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, 
North Carolina, and before that served 
overseas for 27 months, seeing duty 
on 37 Pacific islands in the closing part 
of World War II and after the end of 
hostilities. He attended Ohio State and 
Notre Dame universities, leaving col- 
lege in 1942 to join the Marines as a 
private. He was commissioned an offi- 
cer in 1944. Major Brandel completed 
his college work for the bachelor's de- 
gree at the University in 1954. He is 
a native of Coshocton, Ohio. 



School of 

NURSING 



Mrs. Selma Kleckner 



NOTES FROM THE ALUMNI 

Miss Annette Leaf, '44, is now residing 
in San Francisco, California. 

Peggy Lewis Moore, '52, is now liv- 
ing in Syracuse, New York. Her hus- 
band is associated with the New York 
State Publishers Association. 

Mrs. Esther Garrett Cox, '42, states 
that she and her husband are now com- 
pleting a two-year tour of Guam. This 
being their second tour of Guam, they 
are able to appreciate the many changes 
and improvements that have taken 
place since 1947. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



PHARMACY SCHOOL GRADUATES 
RECEIVE FACULTY APPOINTMENTS 

The following graduates of the School 
of Pharmacy have received new faculty 



52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



appointments: 

Dr. George P. Hager, Dean of the 
College of Pharmacy, University of 
Minnesota. 

Dr. LeRoy C. Keagle, President and 
Dean of the New England College ol 
Pharmacy. 

Dr. John Autian. Assistant Professor 
of Pharmacy in the College of Phar- 
macy. University of Michigan. 

Dr. John J. Sciarra, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry in 
the School of Pharmacy. St. John's 
University. 

MISS GITTINGER TO PRESENT PAPER AT 
PAN AMERICAN MEETING 

Miss Georgianna Simmons Gittinger, 
Instructor in Pharmacology, expects to 
attend the Fourth Pan American Con- 
gress of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, 
which will convene in Washington. 
D. C, November 3-9, 1957. Miss Git- 
tinger will present a paper in the Sec- 
tion on History of Pharmacy. She is 
also a member of the Ladies' Commit- 
tee on Entertainment and Tours. 

This will be her first opportunity to 
attend a Congress, although she was a 
member of each of the three preceding 
ones, at Havana, at Lima, Peru, and at 
Sao Paulo, Brazil. She presented papers 
in absentia at Lima and at Sao Paulo. 

Miss Gittinger has many Latin Amer- 
ican connections, and has visited in 
some of the countries south of the Rio 
Grande. She has published brief, in- 



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formal papers on themes dealing with 
the histois ol Pharmacj and ol Medi- 
cine as developed in Latin America; 
and is an Honorarj Member ol the 
Peruvian Society of the Histon ol 
Medicine. She has also published trans- 
lations from the Spanish, and numerous 
hook reviews ol Latin American studies 
in History ol Medicine and allied sci- 
ences. 

DR. B. I . All I N ATTENDS Ml I II I ■> 
si \I1NAR 

Dr. Benjamin F. Allen. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy, represented the 
School of Pharmacy at the second in- 
dustrial seminar sponsored by Eli Lilly 
and Company in Indianapolis during 
the week of August 25-30. 1957. 

Unique in the industry, the industrial 
seminar was introduced by Lilly in 
1955 to acquaint educators with new 
developments in the fast-moving phar- 
maceutical manufacturing field. 

Eighty-four educators, including dele- 
gates from Canada and Puerto Rico, 
spent five days in attending lectures by 
Lilly scientists and executives on re- 
search, development, control, produc- 
tion, and marketing, and in touring the 
Lilly laboratories. Among the subjects 
of greatest current interest to the group 
was the development of a new vaccine 
to curb the expected epidemic of Asian 
influenza. 

ENTERS SECOND PHASE OF TRAINING 

Army Private Howard R. Schiff, '56, 
recently began the second phase of six 
months active military training under 
the Reserve Forces Act program at Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. 

Schiff is receiving eight weeks of 
medical training at the Fort's Brooke 
Army Medical Center, which will be 
followed by six weeks of advanced unit 
training. The 22-year-old soldier was 
formerly a pharmacist at Read Drug & 
Chemical Company. 

DR. DUNNING HONORED 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning, '97, was hon- 
ored at a dinner on his eightieth birth- 
day, held at the Sheraton-Belvedere 
Hotel, on October 24. He is a former 
Professor of Chemistry. Department of 
Pharmacy, and is Chairman of the 
Board of Directors of Hynson, Westcott 
and Dunning, Baltimore pharmaceutical 
manufacturer. He is the recipient of 
pharmacy's highest award, the Reming- 
ton Honor Medal. He also received 
the first honor award made by the 
Alumni Association of the University's 
School of Pharmacy. 

(Continued on next page) 



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PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
RECREATION and 
HEALTH 

Dr. Theron A. Tompkins 

DR. MOHR ATTENDS MEETING 

Dr. Dorothy R. Mohr. Professor of 
Physical Education, attended the meet- 
ing of the Maryland Association for 
Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion on Friday, October 11, at the 
Edmondson High School, Baltimore, 
where she acted as Panel Moderator for 
the Girls Physical Education Section 
Meeting. 

Dr. Mohr will attend the Fall Con- 
ference of the Eastern District Associa- 
tion of Physical Education for College 
Women to be held at Buck Hill Falls, 
Pennsylvania from November 1 through 
November 3. She will speak at the 
Sunday morning meeting of this con- 
ference. 

Dr. Mohr is conducting research on 
volleyball testing for junior and senior 
high school girls in two Montgomery 
County schools. She is also conducting 
research on Physical Fitness Testing for 
college women, using major and non- 
major classes at the University. 

DR. BERGMAN DELIVERS TALK 

Dr. Rita E. Bergman gave a talk "The 
Contribution of the Helicopter to Mass 
Transportation", on August 7 at the 
National Aviation Education Workshop 
held at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. 

TEACHERS ATTEND MEETING 

The following teachers attended the 
Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health Section Meeting of the Mary- 
land Teachers' Association in Baltimore 
on Friday, October 1 1 : Dean L. M. 
Fraley, Dr. B. H. Husman, Dr. Doro- 
thy R. Mohr, Dr. Dorothy F. Deach, 
Mr. Harold Freeman, Mr. Jack Lowder, 
and Dr. Ellen Harvey. 

PHYSICAL THERAPISTS MEET 

Dr. Gladys E. Wadsworth, Educational 
Administrator of the Physical Therapy 
curriculum. College of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation, and Health, attended 
a meeting of the Council of Physical 
Therapy School Directors of the Ameri- 
can Physical Therapy Association in 
Bandera, Texas October 28, through 
October 30, 1957. The entire program 
was devoted to Physical Therapy Edu- 
cation and included group discussions 
of the responsibility of the teacher to 
the profession, development of teachers 
who are able and willing to accept this 



54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



responsibility, the relation of the Physi- 
cal Therapy curriculum to the pattern 
of University education, and challenges 
for the future. 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION WORKSHOP 

A state wide Teacher I raining Work- 
shop in Outdoor Education was held at 
Camp Greentop, Catoctin Mountain 
Park. I hurmont, Maryland, October 
7-9. Sponsored by the Maryland State 
Department of Education and the Out- 
door Education Project of the American 
Association for Health. Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation, the Workshop was 
co-chaired by Mr. Herbert Steiner, 
Supervisor of Physical Education and 
Recreation for the state and a graduate 
student at the University of Maryland. 
and by Dr. Warren Evans, Supervisor 
of Physical Education for Frederick 
County, a graduate of the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. 

Approximately 100 persons attended 
and were divided into three sections for 
working purposes, to experiment under 
the guidance of specialists and consult- 
ants, in the three areas of shooting, 
fishing and nature interpretation. Ad- 
ditional special sessions were held on 
audio-visual aids, on insect and plant 
collecting, on nature crafts, and on 
resource materials. 

Teachers, principals, supervisors and 
administrators were present represent- 
ing the public and private institutions 
of the state. Dr. Ellen Harvey served 
on the planning group and was in at- 
tendance as were Dr. Lester Fraley, 
Dean, Dr. Burris Husman, Mr. Harold 
Freeman, Mr. Jack Lowder, and Miss 
Koy Freundschuh, all of the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health of the University. 

DR. HARVEY PARTICIPATES ON PANEL 

Dr. Harvey, Recreation Coordinator of 
the College of Physical Education, 
Recreation & Health, recently partici- 
pated on a panel before the Third 
Annual Meeting of the Maryland Pub- 
lic Health Association. October 4th. 
Subject — "Our Senior Population" 
(Recreation). 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

A National Conference on Recreation 
for the Mentally 111 was held No- 
vember 17-20 at the Hotel Woodner 
in Washington, D. C, sponsored by the 
American Association for Health, Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation. Dr. El- 
len Harvey has been asked to attend 
as has a graduate student, Robert Bing, 
who is minoring in recreation. 
(Continued on next page) 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



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SOCIAL NOTES 



ENGAGEMENTS 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Vincent Hedeman of 
White Avenue, Baltimore, announce 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Sonya Mae, and Mr. Joseph Lane Salter, 
Engineering '53. Miss Hedeman and 
Mr. Salter have planned a June wed- 
ding. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. L. Rea of 
Upper Marlboro have announced the 
engagement of their daughter, Kathryn, 
to Mr. R. Bowie Clagett. Miss Rea 
attended St. Mary's Female Seminary 
and George Washington University and 
is a 1949 graduate of the University's 
College of Arts and Sciences. She has 
done graduate work in music and art 
at the University and is presently teach- 
ing art at Frederick Sasscer High School 
in Upper Marlboro. Mr. Clagett is a 
graduate of the University and the 
Law School of Georgetown University. 
A late December wedding is planned. 

Mr. and Mrs. Colvin Carter of Stone- 
leigh, Baltimore, announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Margaret 
Louise, to Mr. William Stanley Tilgh- 
man. The wedding will take place 
December 7. 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Welsh, of 
Belmar Avenue, Baltimore, have an- 
nounced the engagement of their 
daughter, Carolyn Ann, to Mr. Joseph 
P. Bodo, Jr. Mr. Bodo is a member of 
the senior class of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, University of 
Maryland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph E. Cooper of 
Marlinton, West Virginia, announce the 
engagement of their daughter, Doris 
Ella, to Norbert M. Lustine. Miss 
Cooper and her fiance both attend the 
University. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred L. Kaufman, 
of Frederick, have announced the be- 
trothal of their daughter, Barbara Lee, 
to Mr. Randolph Burlin Rosencrantz. 
Mr. Rosencrantz attended the Univer- 
sity and is stationed with the Army at 
Fort Bragg, North Carolina. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. League of 
Simpsonville, South Carolina, announce 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Elizabeth Anne, and Dr. Miner Ells- 
worth Kyger. Dr. Kyger attended 
graduate school at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity and the University of Maryland, 
where he received his M.A. He re- 
ceived his Doctor of Philosophy degree 



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56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



at Catholic University in Washington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Otis B. Altman of 
Sylvania, Georgia, announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter. Linda 
Frances, to Dr. Walter I.. Widdowson 
of Westover, Maryland. Dr. Widdow- 
son attended the University of Georgia 
School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Bertram 
Hanauer have announced the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Elizabeth, to 
Mr. Adolph Murray Brueckmann. BPA 
'55. Miss Hanauer was also graduated 
from the University. 

Mr. and Mrs. James McSherry Shriv- 
er have announced the engagement of 
their daughter, Mary Madeline, to Mr. 
Haswell Franklin. Mr. Franklin, a 
graduate of Gilman School and Johns 
Hopkins University, is a student at the 
University of Maryland School of Law. 



WEDDINGS 

Miss Mary Clara Turner married Lt. 
Richard Bland on Saturday. November 
2, in St. John's Church. Clinton, Mary- 
land. Lt. Bland is a 1954 graduate of 
the University's College of Arts and 
Sciences and of the University of Vir- 
ginia Law School. 

Miss Eleanor Ann Crezee married 
Mr. Gerald Albert Haddaway on Sat- 
urday, October 19 in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. Mrs. Haddaway is a 1954 
graduate of the University's College of 
Arts and Sciences and she was a mem- 
ber of Gamma Phi Beta while at the 
University. 

Miss Judith Gordon Warrenfeltz be- 
came the bride of Lt. Jabez Loane on 
Saturday, October 26 in Hagerstown, 
Maryland. Mr. Loane is a 1956 gradu- 
ate of the University's School of Law. 

The former Miss Sarah Katherine 
Venable's marriage to Mr. Judson 
Rawlings Wood of Germantown, is 
announced by her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Frank Venable of Da- 
mascus, Virginia. Her husband is pres- 
ently a student at the University's 
School of Law. 

A wedding September 22 united 
Miss Verena Belle Voll of Utica, South 
Dakota and Dr. Charles Milton Linthi- 
cum, a graduate of the University's 
School of Medicine. The couple left on 
a wedding trip to Puerto Rico. They 
will be at home in Linthicum Heights, 
where the bridegroom has his practice. 

Miss Kathryn Louise Mudd, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mudd of 
Pomfret, Maryland, became the bride 
of Richard Earl Farrall, Jr., son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard Farrall, Sr. of Wal- 
dorf, in St. Joseph's Catholic Church 
on September 14. Mr. Farrall who is 



presently employed bj the Federal Gov- 
ernment in Washington, graduated from 

La Plata High School and thereafter 

attended Maryland University, Mr, and 

Mrs. Farrall are making then home in 

Washington. D. ( '. 

Mrs Roberta Settle Barlow. Nursing 

'57, was married in August. I l >57. She 

is now living in Albuquerque, New 

Mexico. 

Dr. Michael ( . Meyers, Dentistry 
'54, and Dr. Barbara 1 Seifert, Dentist- 
ry, '54, were married in Baltimore on 
April 27. 

Dr. Francis J. Kihn. Dentistry '56. 
married Adrienne 1 . Batchelor of Bal- 
timore on November 17. 1956. 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio, Dentistry 
'46, of Baltimore, married Rocella 
Bentlev of Baltimore on July 27. 



BIRTHS 

Marilyn and Stanford Berman, Engi- 
neering '50, announce the birth of a 
son, Scott Mitchell on August 2, 1957. 
The School of Nursing alumni an- 
nounce births of many of their gradu- 
ates: Mr. and Mrs. Bruce D. Ferrell, a 
daughter. Julia Elizabeth, on April 19, 
1957. Mrs. Ferrell was Margaret 
Boyes Coulter, '55. Mr. and Mrs. 
David Jude Jones, a daughter, Sheldon 
Elizabeth, on May 15, 1957. Mrs. 
Jones was Katherine Sheldon Ferrell. 
'55. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bronson 
Harrison Staley, a daughter, Dorothea 
Ruth, on May 22, 1957. Mrs. Staley 
was Margaret Helen Marshall, '54. Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard V. Nathanson. a 
daughter, Judith Marsha, on May 29, 
1957. Mrs. Nathanson was Joyce Bev- 
erly Udell, '53. Mr. and Mrs. David N. 
Bates, a son, Daniel Duane, on June 4, 
1957. Mrs. Bates was Evelyn Baxter, 
'50. Mr. and Mrs. Andres J. Bittner, 
a son, John Lawrence, on June 20, 
1957. Mrs. Bittner was Margaret Ann 
Walter. '49. Mr. and Mrs. Roland O. 
Richardson, a son, Roland Emmett, on 
June 20, 1957. Mrs. Richardson was 
Mildred Merlene MacKinzie, '54. Mr. 
and Mrs. Isaac S. Banks, a son, Isaac 
Smith, Jr.. on July 18. 1957. Mrs. 
Banks was Freda Beatrice Parker, '56. 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Smith. Jr., a 
daughter, Catherine Ann, on July 24, 
1957. Mrs. Smith was Catherine Jac- 
queline Adkins, '52. 

Dr. and Mrs. Murray Storch, Dentist- 
ry '41, of Passaic. N. J., announce the 
birth of a son. Michael David, on 
April 21. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lino E. Rodriguez, 
Dentistry '52, announce the birth of a 
daughter, Nivia Lizzette, on March 4. 
(Continued on next page) 



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Dr. and Mrs. John N. Grabner, 
Dentistry '51, announce the birth of a 
daughter. Margarethe Suzanne, on 
April 10. 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice E. Hinds, 
Dentistry '52, of Silver Spring, Md., 
announce the birth of a daughter, Susan 
Corinne, on August 10. Mrs. Hinds is 
the former Jane Clark, who was for 
several years a technician in the De- 
partment of Anatomy. The maternal 
grandfather is Dr. John F. Clark, '22. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Johnson, 
Jr., Dentistry '54, announce the birth 
of a son, Ernest Albert, on August 14. 

Dr. and Mrs. John V. Conte, Den- 
tistry '54. announce the birth of a 
daughter, Mary Frances, on June 28. 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Johnson, 
Dentistry '57. of Fort Myers, Fla., an- 
nounce the birth of a son. William 
Alexander, on August 7. 

Dr. and Mrs. James C. Bulger, Den- 
tistry '55. announce the birth of a 
daughter. Elizabeth Ann, on May 26. 
Dr. Bulger, who completed a tour of 
duty with the U. S. Air Force at 
Mitchel A.F.B., entered the University's 
School of Medicine in September. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jules J. Levin, Den- 
tistry '56, announce the birth of a son, 
Roger Philip, in June, 1956. Dr. Levin 
is in the U.S.P.H.S.. assigned to the 
U. S. Coast Guard Academy in New 
London. Conn. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 




GLEN D. BROWN 

The morning of November 8, 1957 
brought to a close an illustrious ca- 
reer of one of Maryland's best known 



58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



educators. Glen D. Brown had been 
called to his last class. There were no 
sounds of class bells, tramping of stu- 
dents' feet, rustling of papers or shuf- 
fling of chairs. The only noise was that 
of a hospital in the early dawn of an- 
other day. 

It was destined to be a day of deep 
regret for the many who knew Cilen 
Brown. A friend and servant of man- 
kind had been called away. His name 
spelled success and attainment for those 
he had encouraged and stimulated to 
get an education. His name was sym- 
bolic with industrial education for the 
thousands of students who passed his 
way. 

Education was his chosen profession- 
al area, but in the last analysis, his 
chief interest was in people. His greatest 
satisfaction came from seeing people 
grow in stature and develop into per- 
sons of quality and leadership. 

Mr. Brown was a builder of hu- 
manity. People and their qualities were 
the substances with which he daily 
worked and was so skillful in molding, 
and shaping. He leaves behind no 
monumental buildings, bridges, or sky- 
scrapers as might an engineer. Instead, 
he leaves us with a legacy of people, of 
human attainment that towers above 
man's material accomplishments. 

Sixty-six years ago in Howard 
County. Indiana, Glen David Brown 
was born in a log cabin. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Howard, 
Fulton and Miami Counties in Indiana. 
He received his A. B. degree in 1916 
from the Indiana State Teachers Col- 
lege, Terre Haute; and his M. A. from 
the University of Indiana. 

In his early educational career in the 
public schools of Indiana Mr. Brown 
served in the following capacities: 
public school teacher, instructor of in- 
dustrial arts, and social sciences, high 
school principal, supervisor of indus- 
trial arts, supervisor of pre-vocational 
education, director of vocational educa- 
tion, and assistant city superintendent 
of schools. 

Since coming to Maryland in 1931, 
Mr. Brown held the following positions: 
supervisor of part-time education, Bal- 
timore City; principal. Boy's Advanced 
Occupational School, Baltimore City; 
Professor and Head of Industrial Edu- 
cation Department, University of Mary- 
land; State Administrator, National 
Youth Administration; Part-time Super- 
visor, Trade and Industrial Education, 
Maryland State Department of Educa- 
tion and Acting State Director of Voca- 
tional Education; Assistant State Di- 
rector for Vocational Education and 
(Continued on next page) 



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WEDDINGS, BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
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LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



CHESTNUT FARMS 
DAIRY 

ADams 2-1011 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial 
Education; State Supervisor of Adult 
Education, and Director of the Balti- 
more Division of the University of 
Maryland Off-campus Course Center. 

Since 1954 Mr. Brown served the 
University of Maryland in the capacity 
of Professor of Industrial Education. 

As an indication of the esteem with 
which he was held by the student body 
a testimonial dinner was held in his 
honor in the Spring of 1956. Distin- 
guished educators and students from 
Maryland and nearby areas traveled to 
College Park this night to pay tribute 
to a man they loved and respected. Here 
again people gathered to pay honor to 
a man who believed in people and who 
was a builder of people. 

Amid the handicaps of diminishing 
sight and a serious diabetic condition 
Mr. Brown continued to teach and ad- 
vise students at the College Park 
campus and at the Baltimore Center. 
The rigors of travel and class schedules 
were diminished by a love to be with 
people and in particular, students. His 
office was rarely empty of people seek- 
ing advice. There was no statement of 
office hours on his door, for every hour 
was an office hour for anyone who 
needed help. 

Glen D. Brown gave generously of 
himself and all he possessed. His herit- 
age to mankind is rich in its contribu- 
tion through education. No greater task 
can be allotted any man than the de- 
velopment of the human resources, and 
this has been the lot of Glen D. Brown, 
distinguished educator and friend to 
man. 

Mr. Brown is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Suzette Wilcutts Brown, who re- 
sides at 4608 Calvert Road, College 
Park; a daughter, Mrs. Mary Ellen 
Feagins; and two sons, Glen David, Jr., 
and Joseph Edward. 

WEBSTER C. TALL 

Webster C. Tall, LL.B. T3, died Octo- 
ber 23 in Lutherville, Maryland. He 
had been ill since last August. He is 
survived by a wife and a son. Mr. 
Tall was an insurance lawyer, a mem- 
ber of the Eastern Shore Society, active 
in Republican politics, and a member 
of the First Baptist Church in Balti- 
more. 

MRS. IVORY REITER SMITH 

Mrs. Ivory Reiter Smith, Nursing '52, 
was suddenly stricken with a severe 
case of chicken pox in August, 1957. 
Following the onset of this disease was 
the complication of an overwhelming 
viral pneumonia which precipitated 
congestive heart failure and caused her 



death. Mrs. Smith was the mother of a 
fifteen months old daughter, Lisa 
Loraine. Her daughter will remain with 
her father Dr. Milledge G. Smith, who 
is in general practice and surgery in 
Brunswick. Georgia. 

DR. CLEMENT A. ZERDESKY 

Dr. Clement A. Zerdesky, Dentistry '28, 
expired June 3, 1957 due to cancer of 
the pancreas. Dr. Zerdesky was ill for 
six months and had two operations per- 
formed, but all in vain. He suffered 
severely and weighed about 80 pounds 
when he died. 

DR. EPPRIGHT 

Dr. C. Dennis Eppright, '06 (B. C. 
D. S.), of Mission, Texas, died on 
May 9. Dr. Eppright had practiced in 
San Antonio and Manor before going 
to Mission in 1917. Dr. Eppright was 
widely known throughout the Rio 
Grande Valley for his half century of 
capable service in his profession. 

DR. M. M. SCHWARTZ 

Dr. Max Morton Schwartz, '23, of 
Jersey City, N. J., died on January 30, 
1957. Dr. Schwartz was a member of 
Alpha Omega and the Gorgas Odonto- 
logical Society. 

DR. MICHAEL VARIPATIS 

Dr. Michael Steven Varipatis, '39, of 
Baltimore, died on April 17. Born 
January 13. 1917 in Clarksburg, 
W. Va., Dr. Varipatis received his pre- 
dental training at the School of Den- 
tistry. Following an internship at the 
Baltimore City Hospitals, he practiced 
in Essex, Md., for a year before enter- 
ing the Army. Dr. Varipatis served 
from September, 1941 until his dis- 
charge as a Major in April, 1946, with 
18 months in the European Theatre. 
On his return to practice, he was made 
Chief of Oral Surgery and Anesthesiol- 
ogy of the Dental Clinic, Baltimore 
City Hospitals. He was a member of 
Psi Omega. His survivors include his 
wife, Mrs. Stella Klosterides Varipatis, 
and three sons: Stephen, Basil, and 
John Varipatis. 

DR. PRESTON MCCLAIN 

Dr. Preston Le Roy McClain, '27, of 
Baltimore, died on May 25. Born in 
Tyaskin, Md., September 30, 1903, Dr. 
McClain entered Maryland from Bar 
Harbor, Me. He was a member of Xi 
Psi Phi. Dr. McClain is survived by 
his wife, Mrs. Helen L. McClain, and a 
daughter, Carol Dee McClain. 



60 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



RIVERS & BRYAN 



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DR. A. E. HENNEN 

Dr. Albert Karl Hennen, 'OH < B I 
D.S.). of Wheeling. W. Va., died on 
May 24. Dr. Hennen was a Past Presi- 
dent of the Wheeling District Dental 
Society. Born in Palatine, W. Va., on 
August 21. 1882, Dr. Hennen had 
practiced in Wheeling during Ins entire 
career. He was a member of Psi 
Omega and Theta Nu Epsilon. His 
survivors include his wile. Mis. Flor- 
ence Kirkland Hennen; a son. 1 ail; and 
two daughters: Mrs. Atwood Haning 
and Mrs. l.ee North. 

DR. .1. 11. HOFFMAN 

Dr. J. Henry HolTman. "91. of Balti- 
more, died on July 22. Dr. HolTman 
practiced in Baltimore till his retire- 
ment in 1927. During the period of his 
retirement from professional activities 
Dr. HolTman conducted an antiques 
store on North Howard St. and be- 
came a well-known figure in that field. 
He was the brother of the late Dr. 
Charles S. Hoffman of the B.C.D.S. 
Class of 1878. 

DR. A. P. LAURESKA 

Dr. Anthony P. Laureska, '3 I , of Balti- 
more, Md., died on July 26. Dr. 
Laureska came to Maryland from 
Scranton, Pa., where he attended St. 
Thomas College. He was a member of 
the Gorgas Odontological Society and 
Theta Nu Epsilon. His survivors in- 
clude his wife, Mrs. Dorothy Woolford 
Laureska; a son, Timothy A.; and two 
sisters: Mrs. Frank Reiley and Mrs. 
William Duncan. 

DR. GEORGE H. HAGUE 

Dr. George Henry Hague, '05, of 
Elizabeth, N. J., died on March 10, 
1957. Dr. Hague was a member of Xi 
Psi Phi. 

DR. E. A. O'DONNELL 

Dr. Edward A. O'Donnell, '03, of 
Gardner, Mass., died on April 25, 
1955. 

DR. CHRISTOPHER RYAN 

Dr. Christopher A. Ryan, '19, of Pied- 
mont, W. Va., died on September 8. 
Dr. Ryan was a member of Psi Omega 
and the Gorgas Odontological Society. 
He served several terms as Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Potomac Valley Den- 
tal Society. His survivors include three 
sisters: Miss Mary Ryan and Miss 
Katie Ryan, of Piedmont, and Mrs. 
James A. Welsh, of Westernport, Md.; 
and a brother, John T. Ryan, of 
Pittsburgh. 

/Continued on next page) 



I - ' . .' ■ ■ ■ 1 1 i . / 

alumni of I 

1 Id ' ' ■'/ 

\Kr. ly/.i/.'./ 

LUSTII1E mCHOLSOH 

Oldlmabile 

9 H 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
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JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



61 



DR. H. C. YERGER 

Dr. Howard C. Yerger III, '47, of 
Ridgewood. N. J., was killed in an air- 
plane crash on August 21. The plane, 
with two other occupants, was caught 
in a sudden storm and plunged into the 
ocean near Keansburg. N. J. Born in 
Bellefonte. Pa., on May 4. 1918, Dr. 
Yerger received his B.A. degree from 
Pennsylvania State College in 1942. 
During World War II he served in the 
Medical Department of the Army, 
1942-44. In 1953 he was commis- 
sioned in the Army Dental Corps and 
assigned to the Second Armored Divi- 
sion, stationed at Mainz, Germany. He 
was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma and 
Psi Omega fraternities. An active par- 
ticipant in several aspects of commu- 
nity activity. Dr. Yerger was a member 
of the Ridgewood Committee for 
Fluoridation, a director of the Fair- 



lawn Boys Club, Dental Chairman of 
the Regional Civil Defense organiza- 
tion, Concert Chairman of the Orpheus 
Glee Club, and a Past President of the 
Fairlawn Choral Society. Surviving are 
his wife, Mrs. Jeanne Delier Yerger; 
three children: Howard C, Susan, and 
Robert Michael; and his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Howard C. Yerger, of Wayne 
Township. 

DR. JAMES DELANEY 

Dr. James Delaney, '04, of Rocky 
Mount, N. C, died on August 15, 
1956, his seventy-sixth birthday. Dr. 
Delaney had practiced up to a few days 
before his death. Born in Warsaw on 
August 15, 1880, Dr. Delaney attended 
Wake Forest College before entering 
Maryland. He had practiced in War- 
saw and in Salisbury before removing 
to Rocky Mount in 1938. Dr. Delaney 
was a member of Psi Omega. 



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DR. BENJAMIN DABROWSKI 

Dr. Benjamin A. Dabrowski, '40, of 
Baltimore, died on April 28, 1957. ] 
Born in Baltimore on January 18, 1910, i 
Dr. Dabrowski attended Baltimore City 
College and received his A.B. degree 
from Johns Hopkins University in 
1932. On his graduation from Mary- 
land in 1940, he was awarded the 
University Gold Medal for Scholarship, 
an honor certificate (Magna Cum 
Laude). the Alexander H. Paterson 
Medal (for excellence in prosthetics), 
and membership in Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon. In 1940 he was appointed a 
Fellow at his Alma Mater; in 1941 an 
Instructor; and, in 1952, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Oral Roentgenology. Dr. 
Dabrowski presented clinics and papers 
at meetings in several states. In his 
senior year he was President of his 
Class and Treasurer of Psi Omega. Dr. 
Dabrowski is survived by his wife. Mrs. 
Ann Gurbelski Dabrowski; two chil- 
dren, Bernard A. and Carla Ann 
Dabrowski; and two sisters, Mrs. Jose- 
phine Jagielski and Mrs. Pearl Sped- 
den. On the morning of the funeral, 
the School was closed to permit the 
Faculty and the students to pay tribute 
to their highly regarded and greatly 
respected associate and teacher. 

DR. BURT IDE 

Dr. Burt Ide. '02, of Baltimore, died 
on August 26. Born in Bradford, N. Y., 
on March 11, 1876, Dr. Ide practiced 
in Lockport, N. Y.. before he opened 
his office in Baltimore in 1913. He 
served on the Faculty of his alma 
mater from 1920 to 1947. In 1924 he 
became Professor of Operative Den- 
tistry and in 1947, Professor Emeritus 
of Operative Dentistry. Dr. Ide was 
the University Gold Medal man of his 
class, and in his career he fulfilled the 
promise indicated by his achieving that 
award. He was President of the Mary- 
land State Dental Association, 1923-24, 
and in 1929 he was honored by being 
the first dentist appointed to the Mary- 
land State Board of Health. Dr. Ide 
was a Fellow of the American College 
of Dentists and a member of Xi Psi 
Phi, Gorgas Odontological Society and 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon. He was a 
charter member of the Baltimore Lions 
Club and the Torch Club. Dr. Ide was 
a member of the group, representing 
the School and the Alumni Association, 
that founded the Journal of the B. C. 
D. S. Dr. Ide is survived by his wife. 
Mrs. Mary Frederick Ide, and a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Paul Johnson. His brother. 
Dr. Ira C. Ide, of the Class of 1903, 
died in 1953. 



62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



DR. B. S. WELLS 

Dr. Benjamin Sargent Wells. '14, of 
Baltimore. Md., died on August 19. A 
native of Keyser, W. Va., Dr. Wells 
received his predental training at St. 
John's College. He rendered a long and 
important term of service as a mem- 
ber of the Faculty of his alma mater 
in various capacities: as Head of the 
Prosthetics Clinic, the first Instructor 
in Roentgenology, the first Instructor in 
Biology, and. since 1930. Instructor 
in Crown and Bridge. Dr. Wells was 
President of the Baltimore City Dental 
Society (1935-36). President of the 
Maryland State Dental Association 
(1949-50), and President of the Na- 
tional Alumni Association. He was also 
a Fellow of the American College of 
Dentists, a charter member and Grand 
Master of the Oriole Chapter of Psi 
Omega, and a member of Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon and the Gorgas Odonto- 
logical Society. Dr. Wells is survived 
by his wife, Mrs. Thelma Everngam 
Wells; his mother, Mrs. Margaret B. 
Wells; a brother. Dr. George E. Wells; 
a daughter, Mrs. Martha Meekins: and 
a son. Dr. B. Sargent Wells, Jr., of 
Salisbury, Md., who is a member of the 
Class of 1950. 

DR. H. H. STREETT 

Dr. H. Hayward Streett. '99. of Balti- 
more, Md., died on July 27. Born in 
Rocks. Md.. on September 9. 1876, Dr. 
Streett was an outstanding leader in 
four areas of activity in Maryland den- 
tistry; practice, education, organization 
and medico-dental relations. He was 
Associate Professor of Prosthetics on 
the Faculty of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery. 1910-1916. From 1920 
till his retirement in 1946 he was Chief 
of Dental Service of the Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital. He was Past President 
of the Baltimore City Dental Society 
and of the Maryland State Dental As- 
sociation (1913-14). A Fellow of the 
American College of Dentists, Dr. 
Streett was a charter member of Oriole 
Chapter of Psi Omega and a member 
of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. He pre- 
sented papers and clinics before meet- 
ings of the A. D. A., the Maryland 
State Association and the Baltimore 
City Society. At the fortieth reunion 
of the Class of 1914, held in June, 1954, 
he was made an honorary member of 
the Class in recognition of his "splendid 
services as a teacher" and his "many 
fine contributions to his profession on 
both the local and national levels." Dr. 
Streett is survived by a son, Dr. H. 
Baldwin Streett, and a sister, Mrs. Wal- 
ter C. Michael, of Roanoke, Va. 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 1958 



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manufacturing and wholesale 

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63 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron \\ orks 60 

I S. Adkins 63 

Advertisers Engraving Company 50 

Alcazar 51 

Aldo Cafe 38 

Alliance Plumbing & Heating Co 45 

American Disinfectant Company 56 

American Office Equipment Co., Inc 28 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Products (Anchor Fence) 47 

Arcade I'oniiac Compam 53 

Arnold's Village Shop 44 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Association 39 

l t. Vrwood & Co.. Inc 53 

Ah in L. Aubinoe Outside Back Cover 



Baltimore Asphalt Block & Tile Co 40 

Baltimore Business Forms 25 

Baltimore Check Room Service 43 

Baltimore Envelope Co 55 

Baltimore-Washington Express Co 43 

Bank ot C'ristield 63 

Barber & Ross Hardware. Inc 30 

Bard-Avon School 43 

Bartlett Real Estate 62 

Jeanette Beck. Inc 3X 

Bergmann's Laundry 49 

Harry A. Boswell Co 47 

F. S. Bowen Electrical Contractor 34 

Brentwood Inn 56 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 61 

Briggs Meat Product Co 31 

Buck (.lass Co 52 



Carey Machinery & Supply Co 43 

Thos. E. Carroll & Son 46 

Caton Ridge Nursing Home 41 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 52 

Chaney's Garage 48 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 60 

Cloverland Farms Dairy ">7 

Cohn & Bock Co 62 

Cokesbury Book Store 37 

Collegiate Publishing Co 43 

C Olson Merriam Co 29 

Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Assocn 30 

Wm. Cook Funeral Home 32 

A. Myron Cowell 48 

Crosse & Blackwell Co . .'. 26 

Crout, Snyder & Crandall 50 

Crown Oil & Wax Co 58 

Cullen Photo Co 57 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 61 



Jack Daniels Buick. Inc 34 

Danzer Metal Works Co 59 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 33 

F. A. Davis & Sons 40 

Del-Haven White House Cottages 30 

J. H. DeVeau & Son, Inc 44 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc 58 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 43 

I )i iimmond <t Co., Inc 50 



Norman S. Earlcy & Son 59 

Embassy Dairy 35 

C. Engels & Sons 56 



I armers Cooperative Assocn 58 

J. H. Filbert, Inc 56 

I iisl Federal Savings & Loan Assn 53 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... 32 

Frederick Underwriters, Inc 58 

Fuller & d'Albert. Inc 47 



( laramond Press 27 

S. A. Gatti & Son, Inc 46 

Henry B. Gilpin Co 57 

Albert F. Goctze Packing Co 55 

( ioodbody & Company 59 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 33 

J. E. Greincr Co 28 

M. .1. (irove Lime Co 5K 



I he Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 50 

llannes Formal Wear 42 

Harrington Hotel 49 

Harvey Dairy, Inc 46 

Hedin House Hotel 54 

I [endler's Ice Cream 56 

I leppner Engineering Co.. Inc 49 

Hillyard Sales Co 31 

Robert F. lloti 42 

The HofTberger Co 32 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

George Hyman Construction Co 48 



International Travel Dept. A. A. A. 



37 



Eddie Jacobs 37 

Johnston. Lemon & Co 31 



N. E. Kefauver. Jr 62 

Frances Scott Key Hotel 59 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 42 

King Bros.. Inc., Printing 26 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 51 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 51 

Kramer Hardware & Supply Co 45 

Kranz-Willis Music Co 36 

Kustom Klothes & John W. Singer 40 



Lamar & Wallace 31 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince Georges Co.. Inc. 45 

Maurice Leeser Co 39 

Liberty Radio & Television Service 61 

Loewy Drug Co., Inc 63 

Lord Calvert Hotel 30 

Loveless Electric Co 35 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 61 



G. B. Macke C orp 30 

Mangels. Herold Co., Inc 41 

Maria's Restaurant 27 

The Martin Co 54 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 43 

Maryland Steel Products Co 50 

Masser's Motel & RtEtaurant 59 

Meadowgold Ice Cream Co 45 

Metropolitan Tourist Co 40 

Harry S. MicKey Electric Co 52 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assocn. ... 27 

Miller Brothers 36 

Mischanton's Restaurant 36 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro.. Inc 50 

Modern Machinist Co 49 

Modern Stationery Co 26 

Moon Palace 38 

Morrison & Bready. Inc 42 

Murray-Baumgartncr Co 40 

Myers & Quigg, Inc 49 



McCormick & Co.. Inc 29 

John J. & F. Rowland McGinity 56 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co.. Inc 34 

McNeill Surveys, Inc 31 



National Bank of Cambridge 39 

National Equipment & Supply Co 44 

New China Inn 55 

J. Nichols, Produce 61 

Norman Motor Co 34 

North Washington Press. Inc 45 



Old Dutch Tile Co 44 

Oles 1 nvelope Corp 28 

( )lncy Inn 60 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc 39 



Palmer Ford. Inc 54 

Park Transfer Co 39 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors. Inc 55 

Pimlico Hotel 39 

Pioneer Refrigeration Co 26 

Place Vendome 38 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 30 

Puritan Compressed Gas Corp 56 



Quick Service Laundry 47 



Refrigeration Supply Co 35 

Restorff Motors 45 

Rex Engraving Co 48 

Rivers & Bryan, Inc 61 

Rocco's Charcoal House 61 

Roma Restaurant 29 

Rose Exterminator Co 41 



Salisbury Milling Co 63 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 51 

Schofield Co., Inc 37 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) 56 

Seidenspinner. Realtor 34 

Shoreham Hotel 31 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 35 

Russell W. Smith. Insurance 50 

Southcomb, Inc 41 

Southeastern Floor Co 42 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 62 

Standard Duplicating Co 42 

Standard Engineering Co 54 

Stanley Coal Co 59 

Wm. P. Stein. Inc 36 

F. M. Stevenson Co.. Inc 51 

Sturdee Metal Products Co 56 

Suburban Trust Co 57 

Mano Swartz 37 

Sweetheart Bakers 62 



Thomas Distributing Co 58 

Thomsson Steel Co 35 

Wm. J. Tickner & Sons. Inc 33 

Tilghman Packing Co 63 

Trailer Village 29 



Velleggia's Italian Restaurant 62 

James T. Vernay & Sons Co 41 



Wallop & Son, Insurance 44 

Walton & Madden 55 

Washington (oca Cola Bottling Works .... 54 

Washington Stair <* Ornamental Iron Works 47 

Washington Woodworking Co.. Inc 42 

J. 1. Wells Co., Inc 63 

West Indies & Latin American Travel Service 61 

Wilkins Coffee Co 58 

Perry O. Wilkinson 44 

J. McKenny Willis 63 

W. R. Winslow Co 47 

Wolf Cohn 38 

Wonder Silk Store 36 

Worcester Fertilizer Co 62 

Wye Plantation 63 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






I if 4r ^r *». 




M *4 

11*11 



THE HERITAGE 



The University of Maryland is a great University with a rich and historic past. In 
the course of its 150 years of life, the School of Medicine uas founded in 1807 to 
become the fifth oldest in the United States; the School of Law in 1813 to become 
the fifth oldest in the United States; the School of Pharmacj in 1831 to become the 
third such school founded in this country; the first School of Dentistr) in the world 
founded in 1840; the third oldest College of Agriculture in the Western Hemi- 
sphere, founded in 1856. The University can also boast of a College of Engineering 
almost 100 years old and a School of Nursing more than 75 years old. The first 
experimental work in the field of agriculture in the Western Hemisphere is also 
part of the Alumni heritage. 



THE PRESENT 



Today, the University is comprised of 15 fully-accredited graduate and under- 
graduate schools and colleges serving approximately 40,000 students and operating 
on campuses located at College Park and Baltimore and at some 200 overseas 
centers around the world. The University's physical plant is comprised of some 130 
buildings valued at $90,000,000. Approximately 2.000 administrative and faculty- 
personnel make up the various teaching, research and service staffs. The annual 
average operating budget is $30,000,000. 



THE ALUMNI 



Some 30,000 living alumni of the University form a large reservoir of support for 
the University. They reflect credit upon the University through their varied accom- 
plishments and, joined together by a bond of common experience, exhibit a loyalty 
and pride in the University and assist morally, financially and with their time and 
talents in the building of a cohesive Alumni Association and a greater University 
of Maryland. 



THE FUTURE 



An 100 percent increase in student enrollment is anticipated for 1972. Exceptional 
expansion of both College Park and Baltimore physical plants is expected under a 
ten-year plan. Your Alumni Association is anticipating an 100 percent increase in 
alumni membership and participation and an 100 percent increase in alumni accom- 
plishment. In a very great sense, the future of the University depends upon you! 



WASHINGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




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Meeting and Banquet Facilities 



DUPONT CIRCLE 
Alvin L. Aubinoe, Pres. 



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L515 19th Street, N.W. 
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the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Volume XXIX • Number 3 
March-April • 1958 



APR 0-1958 



ication of the 



University of Maryland 




In This Issue: 



The Age of Education - An Address by Dr. El kins 

New Main Library Placed in Opera i ion 

'Flying Follies' Cheer U.S. Servici mi n \broad 

Terps Smother North Carolina 



ALUMNI-VARSITY FOOTBALL 

ALUMNI SPRING REUNIONS 

LACROSSE AND BARBECUE 



Saturday, April 12, 1958 



AT THE COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 



II A.M.— 12 Noon 

12 Noon 
2:30 P.M. 



The Schedule 

Alumni Barbecue Luncheon 
In Student Union Picnic Area 

Lacrosse with Washington & Lee 

Alumni-Varsity Football Game 
Byrd Stadium 



Ticket Prices For Lacrosse and Football Contests Are 



$1.50 for reserved seat; $1.25 general admission; 
$ .50 for students (Elementary and High School) 



4:45 P.M.— 5:45 P.M. 



6 P.M. 



Alumni College Business Meetings 

(Agriculture, Arts & Sciences, Business & Public 

Adm., Education & Engineering) 
Student Union Building 

Bullet Supper, Class Reunions and 
Alumni Program in Dining Mall 



SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE DAY INCLUDE THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BAND 

THE WORLD RENOWNED AIR FORCE DRUM AND BUGLE CORPS 

50 GREAI FOOTBALL ALUMNI— PROFESSIONAL SIARS AND ALL-AMERICANS 

Make checks payable i<< M (I I IB ami forward today to: 
Athletic Office, Box 2V5. College Park, Md. 




COVER: 

Maryland seemed to be /leaded toward il\ greatest basketball KOSOn wlnn 

they toppled tough North Carolina, 74-61. For some inten sting photographs of 
facial expressions <>f Coaches Millikan ami McGuire tei pagt i 15 ami 16 



PHOTOGRAPH 


( Rl Di is 




( over: w i km r sevi kin | Staff) 


Page 15, 


above h \kkis a iur. 


Page 5, upper riuht : U.S. MARIN] CORPS PHOTOS 




H ashington, l> < 


lower right: W mi HAOY ENTERPRISES 




below \i DANEOGEB (Si 


Page (>: James coi lson, Staff Photographer, 


i' iges 16 


& 17: \m km K BEVERI1 


1 lie Diamondback 


Page 19 


WERNER M VI kin . v 


Page 7: \i d\ni (,(.i k. (Staff) 


Pag 


\l DANI (,<,| K | Stl 


Pages 10. II. 12 and 13: M DANEGOER iSin/lt 







the 



Maryland 



MARCH APRIL • 



magazine 



Volume XXIX 



Number 3 



Alumni Publication of 
the University of Maryland 

B OARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
ALVIN L. AUBINOE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of tho University 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMT.' 

JOSEPH H. DECKMAN, '31, President 
FRANK BLOCK, '24, Vice-President 
MISS FLORA STREETT, '38, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 



ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FI NANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-90181 (EM 3-2553 















THE article describing the new Main Library at College Park was omitted from this issue 








at press time for the reason that the date for the dedication of the facility has been advanced 


In This Issue — 






from March 25 to May 3. An article covering the dedication ceremonies and a complete 




FEATURES 




description of the new library will be carried in the May-June issue. 










2 


Alumni Diary 




4 


Campus Notes 




6 


The Age of Education — An Address hy Dr. Elkins 




1(> 


'Flying Follies' Cheer U.S. Servicemen Abroad 




15 


Alvin L. Aubinoe Appointed to Board of Regents 




15 


Dr. Kuhn Appointed Executive Vice President 




16 


15,000 Fans Watch Millikan Out-Gesture McGuire 




18 


Fund Completes First Month of Operation 




20 


Twenty-Four Lettermen Return to Spring Football Drills 




~>0 


News from the Clubs 


MEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS 


AND COLLEGES 






25 


Agriculture 




28 


Arts and Sciences 




35 


Department of Air Science 




36 


Business and Public Administration 




36 


Dentistry 




42 


Education 




44 


Engineering 




47 


Home Economics 




48 


Law 




48 


Medicine 




51 


Nursing 




53 


Pharmacy 




55 


Physical Education. Recreation and Health 




55 


Special and Continuation Studies 




56 


Social Notes 




58 


Completed Careers 




64 


Index of Advertisers 




Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 






College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 








1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council- 



The General Alumni Council: 

(School and College Representatives) 

AGRICULTURE 

Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
Arthur B. Hamilton, '29 
Clayton Reynolds, '22 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

W. Gilbert Dent, Jr., '26 
Charles Ellinger, '37 
Ralph G. Shure, '32 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42 
Alvin S. Klein, '37 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 

DENTAL 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene D. Lyon, '38 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, '22 

EDUCATION 

Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 
William B. Prigg, '53 

ENGINEERING 

Joseph H. Deckman, '31 
Charles R. Hayleck, '43 
Howard L. Keller, '43 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Miss Irene Knox, '34 

LAW 

Leon H. A. Pierson, '23 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 

MEDICAL 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. Mary France Dennis, '47 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Miss Flora M. Streett, '38 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



Ex-Officio Members of the 
Council: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 

Baltimore — Samuel Silber, '34 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

Richard E. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '39 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher, '37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

Like Spring we are breaking out all over. Fortunately, it is in a rash of alumni 
activity. Immediately ahead is the Alumni-Varsity Football Game which is com- 
bined with class reunions at College Park. The big date is April 12 and high- 
lights include a tour of the new library, an alumni barbecue at 1 1 a. m.. Lacrosse 
at noon, the football game at 2:30 p. m. and school business meetings, a buffet 
supper and class reunions in the evening. 

Our diary has something to say about progress on the Greater University Fund 
and the alumni leadership and financial support being provided. Notations have 
also been made of the activation of alumni clubs and of plans for Commence- 
ment Week celebrations in Baltimore. 

Well up on the ladder of satisfaction must be found two actions of recent date. 
Both concern the General Alumni Council and their efforts to discover alumni 
needs and to do something about them. Deans of the colleges have met in con- 
ference with Presidents of school and college Alumni Associations and Alumni 
Clubs. Together they have discussed successes and failures, accomplishments and 
short-comings. These efforts have resulted in a new understanding and, to some 
extent, in new directions and new targets. 

At the same time the Alumni Policy Committee has recalled an old saying to 
the effect that, "We cannot do everything at once, but we can do something at 
once." The General Alumni Council has adopted three basic concepts for alumni 
effort. First, the welfare of the total University is to be the prime interest. 
Second, the alumni will undertake only those programs in which a helpful interest 
is expected and will avoid any efforts which might conflict with University policy. 
Third, the alumni effort will be of a progressive and flexible nature to meet the 
ever changing development of the University. 

The alumni effort without attempting to go into detail seeks to embrace in an 
organized manner all available alumni loyalty. The search is on for the catalyst 
which will spark alumni effort, harness the complete alumni potential of energy 
and dedication to the end that alumni themselves may be a major factor in 
carrying the University to her full potential of greatness. 

To each of us a question . . . what is the role of the alumnus in this new 
effort? Each must answer that question in accordance with his own particular 
interest. Perhaps he will assist in organizing an alumni club or in support of the 
Greater University Fund. Maybe he will direct an outstanding young student to 
the University or send in an item of news for the alumni publication. Maybe he 
will enter a subscription to Maryland Magazine for a fellow alumnus, a prospec- 
tive student or his high school library. Possibly a rare book will be sent for the 
Library or a scholarship will be established as a memorial. We cannot say or 
know exactly what each of us will do at this time. The real encouragement 
comes from the fact that we are thinking. We are looking for a way and we will 
find a way. Some day every alumnus will be able to say, "I am still an important 
part of my University." 

As ever. 




/ a^< — . 



David L. Brigham. 
Alumni Secretary 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




If you want to know more about what the 
college crisis means to you, send for the free 
booklet "The Closing College Door" to: Box 
36, Times Square Station, New York 36, N. Y. 



ihis could be 
the college your child 
wants to enter in 1967. 



It could be any college in the country in 
another ten years. Or every college, for that 
matter. It's a sobering thought. 

Farfetched? 

Not in the least. The blessing of a growing 
population has brought with it a serious 
threat to our cherished system of higher edu- 
cation. College classrooms and laboratories 
are already alarmingly overcrowded by 
mounting enrollments. Admissions authori- 
ties see no letup ... in fact, expect to have 
twice as many applicants clamoring at the 
gates by 1967. Even more critical is the fact 
that faculty salaries remain pathetically in- 
adequate, and qualified people, dedicated 
but discouraged, are seeking greener fields, 
elsewhere. 

If this trend continues, the time will come 
when our colleges will be less able to produce 
thinking, well-informed graduates. When 
that happens, American education will face 
a sad day. And so will our children, our 
country, our way of life. 

But this threat doesn't have to become a 
reality. You can do your part to keep our 
system on a sound footing. 

How? 

By helping the colleges or universities of 
your choice. With your aid, they can assure 
us continued progress in science, in business, 
in statesmanship, in the better things of life 
. . . for us, and for our children. 




-/\- HIGHER EDUCATION 




KEEP IT BRIGHT 



MARCH-APRIL, 1958 




CAMPUS NOTES 



NOVEL PUBLISHED BY 
DR. FRANK GOODWYN 

The Black Bull, a novel by Dr. Frank 
Goodwyn. Professor of Spanish at the 
University, has recently been published 
by Doubleday and Co.. Inc. The scene 
is Texas, the sweeping grazing lands 
of the cattle country. In this wide 
setting the forces of man and nature 
are pitted against each other in a life 
and death struggle. The magnificent 
black bull and a solitary man con- 
front each other in the wilderness, "the 
land that God forgot," and the outcome 
of their final meeting brings the book 
to a smashing — and surprising — climax. 

Dr. Goodwyn has written his story in 
a style which is particularly suitable to 
the area where it takes place. Un- 
hurriedly, gently, almost musically, the 
tale unfolds, quickening in pace almost 
as the heartbeats of the people must 
have quickened at the sight of the 
black bull. The descriptions of the 
physical setting flow smoothly, bringing 
to the reader a vivid picture of the 
monotonous land, little relieved by 
changes in elevation. Life in this rolling 
country is much like the scenery — 
changing little from day to day, in- 
spiring peace and comfort rather than 
high ambition. 

Against this background a man, 
Robclin Alegria, tracks the black bull 
relentlessly. Again and again the bull 
evades his rope to continue his wander- 
ings deeper into the wilderness. Robc- 
lin draws near many times only to be 
thwarted by the almost human intelli- 
gence of the mighty animal. While he 
wears out horse after horse in his 
relentless search, a group of men less 
brave than he wait in the background to 
see the outcome of the battle. 

At the home ranch Josefa, too. is 
waiting — waiting for Robclin to return 



home and marry her. He does not 
turn his thoughts to her, and the com- 
forts that a home and family would 
bring him seem as nothing compared 
to the thrill of the chase. He is more 
happy than not to leave the society of 
men, and of the one woman who would 
bind him with the "chain of customs." 

But Eugenio feels differently: hap- 
pily would he return home if Josefa 
were his. Happy-go-lucky Eugenio 
could ask nothing finer than to have 
Josefa for a wife and many children 
around the home. 

But the black bull holds the atten 
tion of all. He becomes an almost 
supernatural figure as he continues to 
evade the efforts of the best roper of 
the ranch and his companions. Tales 
told around the campfire soon grow 
into a legend, inspiring terror in the 
hearts of the listeners. 

It is here, where man and nature still 
live close together, that the two meet 
most dramatically. This is a story of 
human beings, animals, and all of 
nature revealed as they interact with 
each other. For city dwellers, the book 
brings a fresh breeze straight from 
the Gulf of Mexico. 

The background for the book came 
from Dr. Goodwyn's experience as 
a cowboy on the King Ranch and from 
extended folklore research. 



DR. TR1PLETT HONORED 
AT TESTIMONIAL DINNER 

Dr. William H. Triplett, Executive Di- 
rector of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine Alumni Association, 
was honored February 1 1 by friends, 
alumni and associates at a testimonial 
dinner at the L'Hirondellc Club. 

Participating in the ceremony were 
Dr. James A. McClung, Dr. Charles 




Dr. William H. Triplett 



Reid Edwards, General Milton A. 
Reckord and Dr. Austin Wood. 

A scroll commemorating the occasion 
was presented to Dr. Triplett by Dr. 
John C. Krantz, Jr. 

Dr. Triplett was born in Upper 
Glade, West Virginia, in 1887 and was 
graduated from the Baltimore Medical 
College in 1911. He joined the staff 
of the West Virginia Miners Hospital 
in McKendree and later practiced gen- 
eral and industrial medicine in a 
Mingo County mining community. 

Following a service tradition of his 
family dating back to the Revolution- 
ary War, Dr. Triplett served in World 
War I as a medical officer. Discharged 
in 1919, he practiced medicine in Balti- 
more (Md.) and became a member of 
the University of Maryland medical 
faculty. 

During World War II. Dr. Triplett 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



served as a surgeon in the 19th In- 
fantry. He was discharged with the 
rank of colonel. 

Dr. Triplett has participated in Uni- 
versity of Maryland alumni work since 
1945. He is Past President of both 
the Medical Alumni Association and 
the Alumni Club of Baltimore and a 
Past Vice President of the General 
Alumni Association. 

The testimonial dinner committee was 
headed by Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. Its 
members included Dr. John C. Krantz, 
Jr.. Medical School Dean Dr. William 
S. Stone, Dr. John A. Wagner and Dr. 
Austin Wood. 

Guests of honor included Mrs. 
Triplett. University President Wilson H. 
Elkins. Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Gar- 
land and Mrs. Margaret Giannini. 

NEWS OF SCHOLARSHIP, 
FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITIES 

Recent graduates from the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
take note: 

Nearly $50,000 in scholarships and 
advances-in-aid is available to out- 
standing students admitted to the Har- 
vard Business School for the term be- 
ginning September 10, 1958. Private 
individuals, foundations and business 
fims have made the awards possible 
through twenty-one individual scholar- 
ships or fellowships, ranging in value 
up to $5,000 for the two years of the 
program. 

Four of these awards are unrestricted, 
and require no course prerequisites as 
preparation. They will be awarded to 
outstanding students entering the two- 
year course leading to the degree of 
Master in Business Administration. 

Of particular interest to Maryland 
graduates are the Bankers Trust Com- 
pany Fellowship of $3,000 and the 
James Talcott Fund Fellowship. 

The Bankers Trust Company Fellow- 
ship, with one half of it allocated for 
each of two years, has been made 
available by the Bankers Trust Com- 
pany of New York for an outstanding 
student preparing for the financial field. 

The James Talcott Fund Fellowship, 
provided by the James Talcott Fund 
of New York is an award of $1,250 
for a first-year student who intends to 
enter the field of finance. 



DR. MAC TO PAKISTAN 

Dr. H. Patterson Mac will leave this 
country February 1 to establish a de- 
partment of anatomy in a new school 
of medicine being organized in Karachi, 
Pakistan. 

(Continued on page 23) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 




Barry Wiseman of the University of Maryland talks with Meade Alcorn, Chairman oi 
the Republican National Committee and Ruth Hagy after their appearance on the nation- 
wide telecast of Ruth Hagy's College News Conference Sunday, January 12. over Ameri- 
can Broadcasting Company network. 

In response to Wiseman's questions, Alcorn predicted Republican control of the 
House of Representatives after the next election and charged that Adlai Stevenson made 
very little contribution to the pre-Nato meeting planning. 

Each Sunday College News Conference presents outstanding university students in 
interviews with leading public figures. The program has won awards for public service, 
stimulating interest in current affairs and newsmaking. Ruth Hagy is producer and 
moderator. 



Officer Candidate L. W. Whitaker, right, top man in his class of 600, receives his com- 
mission from Lt. Gen. M. B. Twining, Commandant, Marine Corps Schools. Quantico. 
Virginia, during exercises held Dec. 14. Lt. Whitaker, with a 96.61 average, topped the 
list of the largest Officer Candidate Class to have undergone training at Marine Corps 
Schools since the inception of Training and Test Regiment. Lt. Whitaker is a 1957 
graduate of the College of Business and Public Administration. As a student he was a 
member of Kappa Alpha fraternity, the Terrapin Ski Club and Treasurer of the Mary- 
land Flying Association. 




It IS GOOD TO SEE THAT SO MANY OF YOU HAVE WEATHERED 

the snow and the rigors of the new Academic Probation 
Plan. Immediately following examinations and during 
registration rumors were spreading so rapidly that some of 
us (who depend upon students for a living) began to wonder 
if there really would be a shortage of faculty and staff at 
College Park. The registration lines relieved our fears to 
some extent, but it was not until all of the returns were in 
that we could relax and enjoy the comforts of an "alarming" 
increase in enrollment. 

And. so, we are again in the business of developing a 
quantity of quality, and that is likely to be our role for some 
years to come. The latest figures show that compared with 
the second semester of 1957 the enrollment has increased 
6.7 percent, with the full time undergraduates increasing 
from 7.730 to 8,231. This is a drop from the first semester, 
but conforms to the normal pattern. The most encouraging 
feature is the number of graduate students, showing a per- 
centage increase of approximately 8 percent. We dare to 
hope that a substantial part of this increase is in education, 
and that a few are in mathematics and physics; otherwise, 
science may get us to the moon without any assurance of 
a safe return. 

The University is engaged in education at many other loca- 
tions. The five professional schools in Baltimore do not 



change as rapidly as the undergraduate campus, but with 
additional facilities some expansion can be anticipated. The 
off campus program in Maryland, Washington. D. C. and 
throughout the world is a service unequalled by any other 
university and one which truly has been called an educational 
phenomenon. 

Certainly, the University is still in business and education 
is booming. The need and demand for trained men and 
women with a sound education continues to grow. The faith 
of the people in education is evident wherever one goes and 
in whatever one reads. They are convinced that personal 
success depends upon education, and there is general accept- 
ance of a recent statement that "education is vital to the 
survival of freedom, perhaps even to the survival of man- 
kind." x 

Recent developments in the scientific field have sharpened 
the interest in education. Suddenly we have become aware 
of educational progress in other parts of the world, par- 
ticularly Russia. Charges and counter statements have been 
made about the American system of education; we are told 
that better preparation must be given to more people if the 
world is to be saved from destruction. It is indeed a sad 
commentary on our society that we must be faced with pos- 



1 Statement by Lloyd B. Odium. President of Atlas Corporation, quoted in 
NEA Journal, February, 1958. 



The Age of Education 



An Address by Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University 
Presented at the Convocation of Students and Faculty 



February 28, 1958 




Bible annihilation before recognizing education as the primary 
factor in making this country the greatest on earth. Through 
education we have remained free, prosperous and progressive. 
We have led the nations of the world in the development ot 
human resources. Progress in the arts and the sciences along 
with technological advancement may be attributed, in a very 
large measure, to a broad educational program. If there is 
some reason to identify this period in history with science, 
the atom, jet transportation, or outer space; surely there is 
much more reason to call it the age of education, for under- 
lying science, atomic fusion, jet planes and satellites is edu- 
cation. Coupled with morality, education is the hope of the 
world. 

In such an age it is no wonder that a high school diploma 
is rapidly becoming the common denominator and that a 
larger percentage of high school graduates are applying for 
admission to colleges and universities. This movement within 
an increasing population is creating conditions on our 
campuses which demand attention by students, faculty and 
parents, and the general understanding of all of the people. 

The academic probation im.an of the university is Di- 
rectly in point. It was developed to provide standards that 
would enable qualified students to achieve their aims in a 
State institution with a liberal admission policy. In essence. 



the Plan purposes to gi^c ever) student a fail chance to 
achieve the minimum requirement foi graduation within a 
reasonable period of time. Allowances have been iu.uk- im 
freshmen, and a probation period is provided foi all who 
seem to show am promise. I he administration ol it will 
require constant and careful attention and, in all probability, 
the need for changes will be indicated. I he general require- 
ments, however, are not unreasonable, and il .1 huge numbei 
of students are eliminated it will he due to lack ol ability, 
preparation or application. It is intended to separate the 
qualified from the unqualified. 

It may be helpful to review and analyze the results ol the 
li rst semester. Before giving an\ figures I should emphasize 
that 91 percent of the undergraduate students who em oiled 
in the fall were eligible to return without benefit ol petition 
Some of the 9 percent who were ineligible were readmitted, 
and I hope that if they are not here this morning the) are 
in their rooms studying. A substantial number o! those who 
were denied readmission were "trial" students, but we must 
wait a detailed analysis before classifying failures. We do 
know that, in general, those who entered the University 
with an adequate background and a good record have made 
satisfactory progress. 

During the first semester more than I ().()()() students were 
in attendance at College Park. Of this number 8.579 were 




*rw 




^jr A 



■N& 



2&4 






full-time undergraduates. At the end of the term the casualty 
list included 772 students — 9 percent of the undergraduate 
enrollment — and of this number 692 were dismissed for fail- 
ing 50 percent or more academic credits. All first term 
freshmen who passed at least three academic credits were 
reinstated automatically — a total of 113 — and the Petition 
Board readmitted 58 others — making a grand total of 171. 
To put it another way, 601 out of 772 dismissals were not 
permitted to register for the second semester, or approximate- 
ly 7 percent of the full-time undergraduate enrollment. 

The University is neither proud nor apologetic of this 
record. Higher requirements for a more heterogeneous group 
of students will inevitably produce an increased percentage 
of failures. But this is the negative side of the picture which, 
unfortunately, makes the headlines. On the positive side is 
the vast majority who were encouraged to work harder and 
whose education will be more meaningful. 

In the record of the past semester and in the interviews 
which have followed, there are several points worthy of com- 
ment. In the first place, there are considerably more casual- 
ties because of the ruling which provides dismissal for failing 
50 percent of the academic credits. The removal of basic 
ROTC and required Physical Education from the academic 
ledger has obviously increased the mortality. In the second 
place, there are many who have been placed on probation 
and who are now required to make a 1.5 or 1.75 average 
depending upon classification. While this is not an unreason- 
able average, it is considerably above past performances by 
probationers and requires hard work on the part of the 
student with average ability. 

The director of admissions has told me that in his 
opinion, based on numerous interviews, that many students 
and especially freshmen miscalculate the amount of time to 
do a satisfactory job in college. It comes as a shock that 
four hours of study each day is a minimum requirement for 
the average student. It is a shock because our society, of 
which the educational system is a part, has not demanded 
enough of its youth. This is not the fault of education alone 
but it is inherent in a society which, seemingly, could afford 
to neglect the full development of its potentials and which, 
only recently, has begun to realize the value of intellectual 
accomplishment. 

Another part of the Probation Plan (which is the heart of 
it) that will affect most students at a later date, or affect a 
good many, is the junior standing requirement. This is re- 
lated to the average required for graduation, and University 
officials predict that it may be a difficult hurdle for those who 
do not plan carefully. If there is any indication that you 
may have difficulty attaining a "C" average by the end of 
the fourth or fifth semester which in essence is the junior 
standing requirement. I urge you to study the regulations 
carefully and to consult your advisor or dean for clarifica- 
tion. In view of the number of students who were placed 
on probation for failing more than 35 percent of their 
academic credits, this requirement can hardly be over- 
emphasized. 

A full discussion of standards demands some mention of 
the quality of instruction. If the University has an obliga- 
tion to require a high level of performance by students, it 
cannot escape an obligation to demand an efficient perform- 
ance by faculty and staff. We must guard against a tendency 
to lay blame for all failures on the students and to assume 
that the percentage of failures will remain the same regard- 
less of the teaching and guidance efforts. I am convinced 
that any objective study of the University would conclude 
that there is room for improvements in all areas — even in the 



President's Office. It is a matter of regret that in our uni- 
versities some of the most experienced and able faculty mem- 
bers avoid teaching freshmen and that there is a noticeable 
lack of in-service training and supervision. In my judg- 
ment, the academic profession has suffered because of a 
failure to identify, recognize and reward good teaching as 
much as it has rewarded productive scholarship. This faculty 
cannot afford to neglect the need for systematic supervision 
and appraisal of instruction. In addition to fulfilling an obli- 
gation to the students, it would strengthen the position of the 
University in its relations with the general public and in its 
request to the State officials and the General Assembly for 
additional funds. Some progress has been made toward this 
end. but much more can and should be undertaken depart- 
ment by department. 

Some of the foregoing comments may seem to indicate 
that the University is attempting to discourage increasing 
enrollments. This is not the case. Plans for the future in- 
clude facilities which will accommodate twice as many 
students as are enrolled today, and a thorough study is being 
made by a special committee to determine as accurately as 
possible the direction the University should take to provide 
educational opportunity in Maryland. The Board of Regents, 
administration and faculty are committed to a policy which 
recognizes that education should be made available to all 
qualified students, and it is obvious that the public institu- 
tions will be called upon to serve an increasing proportion 
of high school graduates. 

The problem is to maintain quality within a group of 
varied abilities and interests. With this in mind, the Univer- 
sity will analyze the performance of all students, and 
especially those who are admitted with questionable records. 
Although a highly selective admissions policy would not be 
in keeping with the nature of this institution, officials of the 
University should consider seriously any recommendations 
from the faculty that are based on dependable studies. 

In an age which accents education, there is an awe- 
some responsibility on all individuals, agencies and institu- 
tions involved. The elementary and secondary schools are 
called upon to reconsider their programs, to identify and 
encourage all who have the capacity to pursue higher learn- 
ing, and to give more attention — perhaps more time — to the 
subjects which are most important in preparation for col- 
lege. As they undertake this assignment, the general public 
should be told in a loud, clear voice that well prepared 
teachers of mathematics and science cannot be obtained under 
present conditions and that it might be well to copy the 
Russian method of relieving the teacher shortage — by placing 
the teacher near the top of the social and economic ladder. 
The public should also be told that unless there is a marked 
change in the attitude toward teaching no amount Of scholar- 
ships for students with unusual aptitudes for science and 
mathematics will produce a great many more scientists. The 
public should also recognize clearly the importance of other 
subjects, particularly the proper use of English, as a prepara- 
tion for the study of anything, including mathematics and 
science. 

In the rush of all of the people for at least a high school 
education, the public schools and colleges have failed. I think, 
to educate the parents on the criteria for success in college. 
In addition to quantitative requirements for high school 
graduation, there are the important factors of intellectual 
capacity, grades, and initiative. As parents think with their 
children about plans for the future they should look at the 
whole picture and be guided by reason based on experience. 
A college education is not the only kind of education beyond 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



high school, and it should be undertaken only alter adequate 
preparation. Otherwise, the course may lead to failure and 
frustration and may be a handicap instead ot an asset in 
preparing for a career. 

Another question which is of interest to parents and 
students is the cost of higher education. RecentK several 
articles have appeared advocating that the students be re- 
quired to pay a substantial part, it not all. of the cost of in- 
struction in publicly supported colleges and universities. 
This position can hardly be reconciled with the accepted 
philosophy of education and the present clamor for more 
highly trained men and women. It is a throwback to the 
days when education was a class privilege. Today there is 
general acceptance of the philosophy that higher education 
should be available to all who have ability, ambition and 
initiative, and that this nation will prosper in proportion to 
a determination to fulfill its educational objective. 

It is significant, however, that both the individual and 
society profit from higher education, and it is not unreason- 
able therefore to ask the individual to pay a fraction of the 
cost. This should be considered as an investment and also 
as an indication of good faith and serious purpose. The 
problem of paying part of the cost and, in many cases, board 
and room, lies not so much in limited income as in our set 
of values. The simple truth is that a majority of the people 
do not include education in their budgets and in their finan- 
cial plans, although they admit its importance. This neglect 
denies education to some and handicaps others who have to 
spend too much time working to pay expenses. Further- 
more, it brings about agitation for more and more assistance 
by the state and federal governments to help those who might 
have helped themselves. There is a need for scholarships 
and grants to help deserving students, but there is a real 
danger in the movement to provide a higher education to 
every capable student without regard to the responsibility of 
the home and the initiative of the individual. 

At the University of Maryland, the resident undergraduate 
pays (on the average) about one third of the cost of in- 
struction, exclusive of capital outlay. It is not news to many 
of you that over one-half of the students work part-time to 
help pay expenses, and the need for scholarships and grants 
seems to be increasing. All of these facts were considered 
when the Board of Regents approved a modest increase of 
$10.00 per term effective next September. This was done 
reluctantly to offset a small part of the increasing costs, with 
the hope that it would not discourage the deserving student. 
It is necessary during inflationary periods to increase costs of 
other services, which are self supporting, but I can assure 
you that the present Regents and the administration are 
committed to a policy that will keep the State University 
accessible to all who can take advantage of its facilities. 

It seems to me that university students all over the 
country are more purposeful and are devoting more time to 
academic achievement than they did a few years ago. As a 
higher premium is placed on the cultivated mind and com- 
petition gets keener for admission to college, all activities on 
our campuses will be subjected to a sterner test in the light 
of the individual's welfare. I am not alarmed by editorials 
commenting on the so-called "apathy" of today's students 
because they do not attend "pep rallies" more than once 
during a season, or fail to respond to the call to arms when 
"Rock and Roll" entertainers are disapproved by a faculty 
committee. I would like to think that this so-called apathy 
is not a lack of spirit but a sign of maturity or perhaps that 



ilie simians have moii- important things i>> do 

I in- spirit o\ ,ms organization is important, but sometin 
there is ,t tendenc) to mistake spmts foi spirit Hie soul ol 
an) organization is that intangible quality which supi 

the central purpose, and the spun manifests itself 

ways. When the aims and ideals ot an institution are al 
stake, the spirit is strong, 1 vidence ot enthusiastic loyaltj 
was apparent when we were honored in the Queen ot I 
huul. an occasion which demanded the lull cooperation ol 
the entire Universit) community. It was .1 da) long to be 
remembered lor extraordinar) etiort and exemplar) conduct 
I here have been other noteworth) contributions to the com 

mon welfare, and perhaps it is not out o! pi, ice to single out 

student leadership ami active participation in the orientation 
of new students. I he Universit) will continue to encourage 
student participation to the extent that it is reasonable and 
practicable, and I urge you to participate in the activities 
regulated b) your Student Government Association and in 

Student Government itself. 

Now, in a moment o\ relaxation, you ma) ask. • \\ 
about football?" You may recall that I said some tune ago 
that we should strive for a balanced program. Soon aftei 
this statement, one of the coaches in the Conference sent 
word that his team would help to take care ot our problem. 
Sure enough it did and we lost seven, won two, and tied one. 
Some of the alumni expressed their feeling that we had gotten 
a little too far over on the losing side and that maybe the 
President ought to have an examination lor balance. For- 
tunately, we achieved some balance last season, and a good 
many people returned to the fold after the North Carolina 
game. One critic showed an unusual and amazing sense of 
fairness by admitting that he had been too hasty in his de- 
nunciations. Anyway, we are now in the middle with a lot 
of fans sitting on the fence waiting to see which way we will 
go. I hear indirectly that our prospects are pretty good 
for next fall, but I'm not going to call on Coach Mont to 
testify at this time. He might prefer to relinquish his time 
to our basketball coach. Bud Millikan, who has had some 
trying times on the "Tobacco Trail." In any event. Coach 
Mont may wisely defer a prediction of football until the 
grades are all recorded at the end of this term. The voice of 
the faculty is heard in the land of the Terrapin. 

The University of Maryland, with its manifold activities, 
is a part of a gigantic experiment in the education of people. 
Notwithstanding the questions that have been raised in re- 
cent weeks, this experiment has been the envy of the en- 
lightened nations and the objective has been studied seriously 
by those who would surpass our accomplishments. It cannot 
be denied that mistakes have been made and that we need to 
examine some of our practices. But, above all, there is a 
need to rededicate ourselves to the proposition that universal 
education, properly planned and adequately supported, is 
the only means by which we can attain the ideals of democ- 
racy. 

The universities and colleges have a solemn obligation to 
use their resources in such a way that the age of education 
will result in the advancement of civilization. This is the 
ultimate aim of teaching, research, and service. Each in- 
dividual has an obligation to contribute in accordance with 
his talents. With all of our mechanization and automation. 
the individual remains the source and the object of all prog- 
ress. It is imperative, therefore, that educational institutions 
maintain the kinds of programs that will encourage high 
intellectual achievement. This is our common role at the 
University of Maryland. 



MARCH-APRIL. 1958 






ft 







-m 



m 




"Flying Follies' Cheer U.S. Servicemen Abroad 



The Flying Follies, a home-grown variety show aimed at 
lifting the spirits of American servicemen stationed at 
isolated bases in Iceland, Scotland, the Azores and 
Bermuda, was on tour 19 days, December 19-January 6, 
travelled in excess of 10,000 miles, and presented 17 per- 
formances, two television shows and one radio show. 



Ovik mi Christmas holidays an entertainment team 
of University student and faculty personnel flew the flight 
of the snow bird to Iceland and vScotland, then assumed a 
southerly course to the Azores, dropped in for a spot of tea 
at Bermuda and headed back to domestic and mundane 
Washington, D. C. 

I Ins was neither a CSCS inspection tour, nor Dave 
Brigham establishing alumni clubs on foreign shores. It 
was a voluntary, dcrring do attempt to spread some American- 

lO 



type sunshine to U. S. servicemen stationed in far-off bases 
during the most traditional and sentimental of all holidays. 

If foot-stomping and whistling officers and men were not 
enough proof, letters and citations received since the troupe's 
return, assured "The Flying Follies" of mission accomplished. 

Landing at Goose Bay, Labrador, in preparation for the 
flight across the northern Atlantic, to Iceland, "The first thing 
I saw in the lobby of the airport," says Jil Vasilyk, Assistant 
to Show Director James Byrd, "was a large sign reading, 
'University of Maryland Extension School.' Except for the 
Azores, similar signs were displayed at our every stop. 

"Iceland. I remember," continues Jil, "had only four hours 
of daylight. We landed at approximately 7:30 in the morn- 
ing in the pitch black and we saw no daylight for the rest 
of that day. We were so exhausted we went directly through 
customs, ate breakfast and went to bed. We performed for 
our first audience that night. My chief recollection of Ice- 
(Continued on page 14) 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



SHOW PROGRAM 



Act I 
opening chorus Entire Company 

COMEDY RouilNI Richard David. Master of 

Ceremonies 

VOCAl Lucille Jamison, operatic sopra- 
no, sinking "One Kiss" 

baton Nancy Nystrom, Harriett 

Hasted. Dorothy McCarty 

SONG AND DANCE Connie Cornell and Carol Isa- 
acson with the Men's (horns 

DANCE DUET Karen Devey and Joseph War- 

lield. dancing to the rhythms of 
"Steam Heat" 

vocal De Estye Graumann, singing 

"Fascination," "Mademoiselle 
de Paris" and "Ties Magni- 
fique" 

chorus Girls in evening gowns 

musical melodies lames Owens. John Hue and 

Russell Beall 

act i finale Entire Company 



Intermission 



Act 11 

opening chorus Entire Company in Calypso 

costume. Lucille Jamison, solo. 

monology Clare Wooten 

London number Entire Company in raincoats 

costume with umbrellas 
Peggy Ann Stanifer singing a 
vocal solo, "Foggy Day in 
London Town" 

vocal Betsy Clute, singing "Blue 

Prelude," "My Man " 

Finale 

monology Laura Morton, " 'Twas the 

Night Before Christmas" 

chorus Entire Company, singing "The 

Christmas Song" 

vocal Jackie Dean 

BATON Nancy Nystrom, Harriett Hast- 
ed and Dorothy McCarty, us- 
ing flaming batons 

chorus Entire Company, singing 

"Sleigh Bells" 



CAST 

Clare Wooten, Arts and Sciences 

Lucille Jamison, Education 

Connie Cornell, Drama 

Carol Isaacson, Speech 

Nancy Nystrom, Nursing 

Jackie Dean, Drama 

Margie Foster, Education 

Dorothy McCarty, Arts and Sciences 

Karen Devey, Practical Art 

Peggy Ann Stanifer, Speech 

Betty Ann Clute, Drama 

Pat Rouleau, Drama 

Jil Vasilyk, Music 

De Estye Graumann, Music 

Harriet Husted, Physical Education 

Dick David, Business and Public Administration 

Joe Wartield, Education 

Morris Hardy, Music 

Ken Reck, Music 

Harvey Beavers, Pre-Dental 

Steve Hoffman, Arts and Sciences 

Dennis Werber. Arts and Sciences 

Russell Beall, Music 

Jim Owens, Arts and Sciences 

John Hite, Arts and Sciences 




Properly dressed with parka and parachute, cast member 
waits out the flight to Iceland by filing her nails. 




Show Director, James Byrd chats with Air Force officer 
assigned to troupe. 




Opening number in Iceland. 



MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



11 




S< ottish sweater shoppers 






At the Robert Burns Museum 



Members of the 'Flying Follies' struggle for 
footing in the face of fierce Icelandic gales. 




Cycling in Bermuda 



12 



Sub-zero weather didn't bother this open jacketed tiller. 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 





Seeking dilations in the Portuguese Azores 



Rehearsing on Bermuda sands 



Home again with gifts for family and friends 



Barefoot Azorians watch the 'Follies' last show 





'Flying Follies' 

Continued from page 10 



land was that the wind blew constantly. 

"During our stint in Iceland, we were flown north to the 
'H Sites.* military outposts, one of which was located ap- 
proximately 14 miles below the Arctic Circle. I don't think 
that any of the audiences we played to on tour were as 
appreciative as the men who manned these posts." 

Jim Byrd. as Director of the "Follies" carrying the burden 
of responsibility for the welfare of the 16 girls and 10 boys 
who made the trip, remembers with a chill when, "on the 
morning we arrived in Iceland I was talking with the Special 
Services officer and he told me that the following day we 
were going to take a trip to an H Site and he said would I 
please divide the company into two groups as evenly as 
possible so that in case one plane didn't make it, the re- 
maining group could still do the show." 

Connie Cornell, a drama major, saw Iceland from another 
perspective. "I thought we'd be traveling in dog sleds, skiis 
and snow shoes and living in cold Quonset huts. Instead, 
we found ourselves quartered in a lovely hotel with private 
bath and maid service, and treated just beautifully." 

"When we returned to the United States, we realized that 
the only Eskimos in Iceland got there the same way we did: 
on a tourist visa!" added Al Danegger, Head of the Uni- 
versity Photographic Laboratory and official photographer for 
the Follies. All of the excellent photographs accompanying 
this article were taken by Mr. Danegger, many under extreme 
conditions. 

To Nancy Nystrom, student in the School of Nursing and 
one of the three batonists in the show, Icelandic University 
with its five language requirement, geyser-heated swimming 
pool and rigid entrance examinations, was of special interest. 

"In Iceland," she recalls, "two groups of people stood out 
as unusual: children and policemen. Children for their 
healthy appearance and their natural beauty, and policemen 
for their extreme height, intelligence and courtesy." 



were requested to go through first. Of the 26 members of 
the company, 13 went through the line for the hospital 
and when the thirteenth person had passed through, the 
customs man said to me, 'Please do not permit any of these 
people to die over here, there's too much red tape involved!' " 

Scotland presented the first opportunity for shopping. 
Shop owners were reported to be very anxious to please and 
not disappointed when no sale was made. Most purchasers 
trusted to the rigid honesty of the Scots in knowing the 
correct rates of monetary exchange. 

Highlight of their Scottish excursion was a tour through 
the handsome countryside and a visit to the now legendary 
Brigadoon, the Robert Burns Cottage, and Colleen Castle, 
the home of President Eisenhower in Scotland. 

On the 12-hour flight to the Azores, the pilot flew his 
plane directly across Wales, the English Channel and the 
coast of France, arriving at the islands that night. Miss 
Nystrom was presented with a cake commemorating her 
birthday, prepared for her by the former chef for the late 
President Roosevelt. 

"The last night we were in the Azores," recalls Mr. Byrd, 
we gave a performance for the Portuguese people in their 
own theater. This was our sixth show. We were ready to 
depart and the plane was waiting for us and as it turned out, 
we were very pleased to have remained there for an hour or 
two more. At the end of our performance our five-man 
orchestra surprised the audience by playing the Portuguese 
National Anthem which they had only learned that day. 
Then our company sang the Star-Spangled Banner. It was a 
most touching moment and really I think one of the most 
exciting moments of our tour. 

"Very few of the people in that audience, if any, under- 
stood English. Through an interpreter, our MC, Dick David 
learned to make the program announcements in Portuguese 
It helped make our audience more receptive, certainly, and 
we felt the performance was one of the more successful of 
the tour. 

"The Commander of the Portuguese Air Force came back- 
stage after the show and presented the cast with Portuguese 
Air Force officer 'wings' and announced through his inter- 
preter that we were now honorary officers." 



Jackie Dean, a drama major and vocal soloist in the 
show, remembers the side trip to Rakevik and the special 
instruction in Icelandic customs given her by Mr. Goodman- 
son, of the U. S. Information Agency. 

"Mr. Goodmanson did a wonderful job explaining that 
the Icelandic people are a proud people with a right to be 
proud." added Mr. Danegger. "They are a country of a great 
many accomplishments. They are half the size of Silver 
Spring and yet operate a major university and a national 
theater. They have a fine fair, a symphony orchestra, they 
operate a big airline around the country. All this by a 
nation of 150,000 people." 

When the troupe ate their meals in the service dining halls, 
the girls, by prior agreement, would each sit at a separate 
table to have an opportunity to talk with as many personnel 
as possible. Service officers reported that it was the custom 
of most of the professional troupes to sit by themselves and 
to not fraternize widely with the general personnel. 

From Iceland, the Follies paid a surprise not-on-the- 
itinerary visit to Scotland. 

"When wc were going through customs," reports Mr. 
Byrd, "all personnel seeking treatment at the base hospital 



After the Azores, the troupe departed for their last 
stop. Bermuda, 18 miles away. Arrival in "sunny Bermuda" 
was accompanied by a pouring rain and the coldest spell 
recorded there in 35 years. Three days later, the Follies 
departed for home. 

Along the tour, theaters were not always available or prac- 
ticable and shows were presented with little or no variation 
in hospital dormitories and on airport runways. All members 
of the company had special praises for the manner in which 
Captain Quentin Teevin, of the Legal Department, U. S. Air 
Force, discharged his responsibilities as tour escort officer. 

The tour was made possible by the Military Air Transport 
Service, through the person of Major Richard F. Jennings, 
Special Services officer. Major Jennings asked Mr. Byrd last 
spring if he would be willing to attempt to organize another 
tour to follow up the one made in 1956. 

"Of special importance to us through the entire trip," 
Miss Nystrom says, "was the central fact that we were repre- 
sentative of the University of Maryland. As we proceded 
from country to country we were aware that our audiences 
would remember us, certainly, but that they would remember 
far longer the University of Maryland and our conduct and 
the manner in which we entertained." 



14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Alvin L. Aubinoe Appointed to Board of Regents 



The MARYLAND SENATE CONFIRMED 

the nomination of Mr. Alvin L. 
Aubinoe to the Board of Regents in 
action taken February 24. Mr. Aubinoe 
was appointed by Governor Theodore 
R. McKeldin to fill out the term of the 
late Judge William P. Cole, Jr., which 
expires June 1, 1958. 

A background of student and alumni 
interest and activity preceded Mr. 
Aubinoe's appointment to the Board. 
He is a 1926 graduate of the University, 
holding a degree in engineering. As an 
alumnus, he has had an interest in 
developments occurring within the Uni- 
versity. The football team receives 
enthusiastic support from Mr. Aubinoe, 
who is a Past President of the Terrapin 
Club. 

Born in Washington, D. C. on Febru- 
ary 12, 1903, Mr. Aubinoe attended 
local schools. Since his graduation 
from the University he has become 
widely known in his profession as a 
builder, architect, and developer. In 
addition, he has also found time to 
establish a considerable reputation as a 
civic leader. He is a member of Beta 
Kappa Chapter of Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity; the Court of Honor, Wood 
Province, Kappa Alpha Order; Treas- 
urer of the Beta Kappa Corporation; 
President of Fraternity Housing Corpo- 
ration, Kappa Alpha Order; Past Na- 
tional President of Alpha Delta Sigma 




Mr. Aubinoe 

Fraternity; Past President of the Home 
Building Association of Metropolitan 
Washington; Director of Home Builders 
Association of Metropolitan Washing- 
ton; Director of the Federal City Coun- 
cil; Director of National Metropolitan 
Bank of Washington; member of the 
Board of Trustees of the United Com- 
munity Services of Washington; and 
Director, Washington Board of Trade. 
He is a recent Presidential appointee to 
the Civil War Centennial Commission 
and a member of the Drafting Com- 
mittee of D. C. Housing Code. 



One might imagine thai Mi Vubi- 
noes civic activities would occupj his 
entire time, but such is not the I 
Ik- is President of Alvin I Aubinoe, 
Inc.; Aubinoe Construction Company 
Wildwood Investment c corporation; 11k- 
Allandott, Inc.; the Washington and 
lee Apartments, Inc.; Parkside Apart 
ments, Inc.; DuPont Plaza, Inc.; treas- 
urer oi Hardware, Inc. and principal 

partner in the architectural firm Ol 

Aubmoc. Edwards and Beet j 

1 here are main apartment buildings. 
office buildings, industrial structures, 

hotels, and homes on the Washington- 
Maryland-Virginia landscape which 
testify to the progressive outlook ol the 
Aubinoe firms. Among structures 
recently erected here, Mr. Aubinoe is 
the architect of the National Radio 
Institute, 3939 Wisconsin Avenue. 
Washington, D. C. and architect and 
builder of Home Builders Association 
of Metropolitan Washington, 2101 K 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

In addition to civic and business 
activities, Mr. Aubinoe devotes a con- 
siderable part of his time in working 
for his church. He is a member of 
Bethesda Presbyterian Church where he 
serves as Trustee and President of the 
Board of Deacons. 

Mr. Aubinoe maintains a permanent 
residence in Bethesda, Maryland and 
in the summer, at Rehoboth. Delaware. 



Dr. Kuhn Appointed Executive Vice President 



Dr. albin o. kuhn, agriculture '38, 
has been appointed Executive Vice 
President of the University, Dr. Elkins 
has announced. Dr. Kuhn formerly 
served as Assistant to the President. 

As Executive Vice President, Dr. 
Kuhn will be directly responsible to the 
President and will act for the Presi- 
dent as the need arises. He will con- 
centrate to some extent on the programs 
of the Professional Schools in Balti- 
more, the University Hospital, Agricul- 
ture, Finance and Business, and Plant 
Maintenance and Operation. Dr. Kuhn 
will maintain a regular schedule at the 
Baltimore office located in the Bressler 
Building. 

Dr. Kuhn was born at Woodbine, 
Carroll County, in 1916 and reared on 
a dairy farm near Lisbon. He attended 
Lisbon Elementary and High School, 

MARCH-APRIL, 1958 




#3p ^* fv 







f; 



/ 



Dr. Kuhn 



graduating from the latter in 1933. 

He received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Agriculture, and was gradu- 
ated with first honors. Taking graduate 
training at both the University of 
Maryland and the University of W is 
consin. Dr. Kuhn received his Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees from the University of Mary- 
land. 

As a teacher, Dr. Kuhn served in the 
Agronomy Department, as an instructor, 
an Assistant Professor and Associate 
Professor from 1939 to 1944 and from 
1946 to 1948. 

In the space of years from 1944 to 
1946. he was a line officer in the U. S. 
Navy, with principal duty in the 
Pacific Ocean area. 

From 1948 to 1^55. Dr. Kuhn was 
(Continued on page 24) 

15 





15,000 Roaring Fans Watch Milli 





As Maryland Smothers High- and -Mi^ 



University of Maryland's finest 
hour in basketball came to the William 
P. Cole, Jr. Student Activities Building 
the night of January 1 1 when our 
young coach H. A. (Bud) Millikan 
gained his and the school's biggest win, 
a 74-61 victory over the defending na- 
tional champions, arch-rival North 
Carolina. 

It was then that the Terrapins estab- 
lished themselves as solid choices to be 
voted among the Nation's top ten teams 
in basketball. With their continued fine 
play, they have been picked as high as 
the sixth best team in the country. 

The game also marked another mile- 
stone in Maryland athletic history. A 
turnaway crowd of 15,100 estimated 
fans jammed the beautiful Cole Field 

16 



House. This was the largest basket- 
ball crowd ever to see a single game 
in the East and South, outside of Madi- 
son Square Garden whose 18,000 
capacity usually is used for double- 
headers. Also, the press coverage 
ranged from New York, New Jersey, 
Philadelphia, the local area, and through 
the Carolinas, the largest representation 
of the fourth-estate at a Maryland 
basketball game. 

It was a "dream come true" for the 
Administration and the Athletic Depart- 
ment as the big house was bulging with 
standees. There were many that said 
as completion was neared that a full 
house would never be realized for a 
basketball game. The Carolina game 
marked the fourth time in three seasons 



that over 12,000 turned out for a game. 
Ten and eleven thousand have been 
seated on many other occasions, and 
there is every reason to believe that it 
will be filled many more times. For 
those who come into the Field House 
for the first time, the impression is 
lasting that it is the most magnificent 
indoor building on any college campus. 
The impression cannot be disputed. 

It was a sharper and more poised 
Maryland basketball team that defeated 
the Tar Heels. Millikan has come up 
with what he calls his best Maryland 
team. There is no doubt that the Mil- 
likanmen have been helped by their 
two big sophomores who are starters 
this season. Al Bunge, 6-8 Vi and 
{Continued on page 25) 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



p 


^ » 


^ 






1 







! ut- Gesture McGuire 




orth Carolina, 74-61 








17 




Greater University Fund 
Completes First Month of Operation 



First response to initial mailing 
pieces and work performed by special 
committees on behalf of the Greater 
University of Maryland Fund, has re- 
sulted in receipt of an estimated $40,- 
000 in cash and pledges. The Fund's 
first month of operation ended February 
10. 

Appointment of voluntary committee 
members and fund Regional Managers 
is virtually complete. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, General 
Chairman, recently announced the ap- 
pointment of a Special Gifts Committee 
to include: Dr. J. C. Krantz, Dr. 
Thurston Adams, Mr. Austin Diggs, Dr. 
Arthur I. Bell, Mr. J. Gilbert Prender- 
gast, Mr. Jesse J. Krajovic and Mr. 
Charles S. Archer, Jr. 

Dr. Goldstein, commenting on the 
work of this Committee, said, "It has 
been particularly gratifying that in 
addition to the many alumni already 
contributing, a great many gifts have 
been made by friends, who are not 
alumni of the University." 

The General Chairman had previ- 
ously named 91 alumni to serve as 
Regional Managers in the general 
campaign. They are: 

Section One, west and midwest 

NORMAN D. GARDINER, .JR.. LAW '36. 

now residing in Tucson, Arizona, re- 
sponsible for the States of Arizona, 
Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mex- 
ico, Texas, Utah. Wyoming. 

I. I. MATTINGLY, ENGINEERING '43, 

now residing in Chicago. Illinois, re- 



sponsible for the States of Arkansas, 
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri. 

J. D. KIEFFER, ARTS & SCIENCES '30, 

now residing in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, responsible for the States of 
California, Nevada, Oregon, Washing- 
ton. 

H. JOHN BADENHOOP, JR., BUSINESS 
AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION '40, nOW 

residing in St. Paul. Minnesota, respon- 
sible for the States of Iowa, Kansas, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North 
Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, 
Wisconsin. 

JOHN E. OSTRANDER, ARTS & SCIENCES 

'55, now residing in Warren, Ohio, re- 
sponsible for the States of Kentucky, 
Ohio. Tennessee. 

FRANCISCO VERAY, DENTISTRY ' 16, 

now residing in Yauco, Puerto Rico, 
responsible for Puerto Rico. 

Section Two, NEW ENGLAND 

GEORGE G. DICENZO, LAW '27, nOW 

residing in New Haven Connecticut, re- 
sponsible for the State of Connecticut. 

DR. F. P. GILLEY, DENTISTRY '45, nOW 

residing in Bangor, Maine, responsible 
for the States of Maine, New Hamp- 
shire. Vermont. 

DR. WILLIAM J. BELAND, DENTISTRY 

'14, now residing in Southbridge. Mas- 
sachusetts; DR. PATRICK J. FOLEY, DEN- 
TISTRY '24, now residing in South 
Boston, Massachusetts; R. a. b. cook, 
law '05, now residing in Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts; DR. S. HAROLD TINGLEY, nOW 
residing in Boston, Massachusetts; DR. 

NORMAN J. WILSON, MEDICINE '35. nOW 



residing in Boston, Massachusetts: all 
responsible for the State of Massachu- 
setts. 

DR. EDWARD C. MORIN, DENTISTRY '20. 

now residing in Pawtucket, Rhode 
Island, responsible for the State ol 
Rhode Island. 

Section Three, M I d-a tlantic 

M. MYRON PRICE, AGRICULTURE '25, 

now residing in Laurel, Delaware, re- 
sponsible for the State of Delaware. 

JAMES E. DIGMAN, ENGINEERING '21. 

now residing in Summit. New Jersey 

SAMUEL B. MCFARLANE, JR., ARTS & 

sciences '39, now residing in Summit 
New Jersey; dr. b. curtis hester 
dentistry '44, now residing in Glen 
bridge, New Jersey; paul a. pumpian 
law '53, now residing in New Bruns 
wick, New Jersey, dr. william h 
varney, medicine '28, now residing in 
Washington, New Jersey; william h. 
hunt, pharmacy '32, now residing in 
Northfield, New Jersey: all responsible 
for Northern New Jersey. 

r. r. welsh, engineering '29, now 
residing in Haddonfield, New Jersey; 

WILLIAM SCULL, ENGINEERING '45, now 

residing in Haddonfield, New Jersey: 
both responsible for Southern New 
Jersey. 

homer hicks, now residing in 
Nichols, New York; dr. william a. 

STANTON, ARTS & SCIENCES '36, now 

residing in Rochester, New York; 

JAMES C. CONRAD, JR., ENGINEERING 

'50, now residing in Rochester, New 
York; Howard fawcett, arts & 
sciences '40, now residing in Schenec- 
tady. New York: all responsible for 
Upstate New York. 

DR. JOSEPH G. ZIMRING, ARTS & 

sciences '32. now residing in Long 
Beach. New York, responsible for 
Downstate New York. 

dr. Alexander slacoff, now resid- 
ing in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; dr. 

JOSEPH FINEGOLD, MEDICINE '34, nOW 

residing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 

CHARLES FURTNEY, ENGINEERING '37, 

now residing in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania; MARTIN L. BROTEMARKLE, EN- 
GINEERING '37, now residing in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania; a. b. fisher, 
engineering '26, now residing in Pitts- 
burgh. Pennsylvania; Gordon keesler, 
arts & sciences '29, now residing in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: all responsi- 
ble for Western Pennsylvania. 

e. p. beachum, law '49. now re- 
siding in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; DR. 
leroy g. cooper, law '50, now residing 
in York, Pennsylvania: both responsi- 
ble for Eastern Pennsylvania. 

DR. JAMES E. MCCLUNG, MEDICINE 



18 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



'40. now residing in Richwood, West 
Virginia, responsible lor the State of 
West Virginia. 

Section Four, SOUTHEAS T 

BRUCE F. MACRAE, BUSINESS AND I'Uli- 

i k administration '51. now residing 
in Jacksonville II, Florida, responsible 
for the States of Alabama, Louisiana. 
Mississippi. 

john r. .johnson, i aw '29, now 
residing in St. Petersburg. Florida; DR. 
BERNARD MILLOFF, MEDICINE '44, now 
residing in Hollywood, Florid;:; dr. 
SI AN I FY E. SCHWARTZ, MEDICINE '41. 
now residing in Miami Beach, Florida: 
all responsible for the State of Florida. 

sylvan garfunkel, law '38, now 
residing in Savannah, Georgia, respon- 
sible for the States of Georgia. South 
Carolina. 

DR. HENRY S. ZAYTON, DENTISTRY 46. 

I now residing in Rocky Mount, North 
, Carolina, responsible for the State of 
i North Carolina. 

L. P. BAIRD, ENGINEERING '28, nOW 

residing in Richmond, Virginia; paul 

1 E. MULLINIX, AGRICULTURE '36, nOW 

residing in Richmond, Virginia; john 
i D. Rogers, now residing in Richmond. 

Virginia: all responsible for Southern 
i* Virginia. 

MRS. MILDRED S. JONES, EDUCATION 

'22 now residing in Arlington, Virginia; 

i COLONEL E. M. MINION, ARTS & 

\ sciences '36, now residing in North 
I Arlington, Virginia; commander w. 
i leischner, now residing in Alexandria, 
Virginia: responsible for the Washing- 
! ton. D. C. suburbs of Virginia. 

i Section Five, Maryland counties 

THOMAS N. BERRY, LAW '40, nOW 

■ residing in Cumberland; dr. samuel l. 

( jacobsen, medicine '31, now residing 

; in Cumberland; thomas b. finan, law 

'39, now residing in Cumberland: all 

responsible for Allegany County. 

H. EDWIN SEMLER, ARTS & SCIENCES 

'22, now residing in Hagerstown; ray- 

| MOND C. PATTERSON, BUSINESS AND 

| public administration '50, now re- 
j siding in Hagerstown; responsible for 

Washington County. 

benjamin b. rosenstock, law '25, 

now residing in Frederick; nelson r. 

BOHN, BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINIS- 
TRATION '51, now residing in Frederick; 

ALVIN S. KLEIN, BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 

administration '37, now residing in 
Frederick: all responsible for Frederick 
County. 

Stanford hoff, law '34, now resid- 
ing in Westminster, responsible for 
Carroll County. 

JESSE KRAJOVIC, ARTS & SCIENCES 

'32, now residing in Upperco; t. t. 

MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



SPEER, M3RICULTUR1 "17. mm residing 

m Luthei v tile; i hi honor vbi i hali 

iiammond. l \\\ '25. now residing in 
Stevenson; DR. C. F. O'DONNELL, midi- 
CIN1 '44. now residing in low son; 
\i I XAND1 R GORDON ni, I \\\ '34. now 
residing in RllXtOIi: all responsible lor 

Baltimore Count) 

I Kl 1)1 Kl< k o. MITCHELL, u.Kli II- 
ti'Ri '55 now residing in Pens man. 

responsible lor Harford County. 

DR. II. VINMNI DAVIS, Ml UK INI '27, 

now residing in Chesapeake City, re- 
sponsible lor Cecil County. 

BENNY AII'IKSIIIN, EDUCATION '39. 
now residing in Silver Spring; john 
III isi , jr., ARTS .\ SCIENCES '47. now 
residing in Bethcsda; dr. h. k. vann, 
now residing in Olncy; DONA1 D R. JA< k- 

SON, BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRA- 
TION '51, now residing in Bethesda: all 
responsible for Montgomery County. 

E. HOLMES HAWKINS, AGRICULTURE 

'48. now residing in Eilicott City, re- 
sponsible for Howard County. 

DR. E. J. BAUMGARTNER, MEDIC1NI 

'31, now residing in Oakland, responsi- 
ble for Garrett County. 

W. P. CHAFFINCH, ARTS & SCIENCES 

'30, now residing in Easton, responsible 
for Kent and Queen Anne's Counties. 

CLAYTON REYNOLDS, AGRICULTURE 

'22, now residing in Denton, responsible 
for Caroline County. 

dr. Howard f. kinnamon, now re- 
siding in Easton, responsible for Talbot 
County. 

F. A. WILLIAMSON, ENGINEERING '44, 

now residing in Cambridge, responsible 
for Worcester, Dorchester, Wicomico, 
Somerset Counties. 

HARRY A. BOSWELL, JR., BUSINESS 
AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION '42, nOW 

residing in Hyattsville; william h. 
evans, agriculture '26, now residing in 
Hyattsville; gurnie c. hobbs, arts & 
sciences '54, now residing in Hyatts- 
ville; CHESTER S. WARD, ENGINEERING 

'32, now residing in College Park: all 
responsible for Prince Georges County. 

MRS. CLARE G. DUCKETT, LAW, nOW 

residing in Annapolis; jack c. doney, 
arts & sciences '49, now residing in 
Glen Burnie; o. bowie duckett, now 
residing in Annapolis: all responsible 
for Anne Arundel County. 

JEANNE M. MAGNANI, ARTS & 

sciences '50. now residing in Hyatts- 
ville: WILLIAM A. IOKER, LAW '33. IlOW 

residing in Leonardtown: both responsi- 
ble for Calvert. St. Mary's. Charles 
Counties. 



Section Six, B a l i i m o r e 

CHESTER W. TAWNEY, BUSINESS AND 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION '31; MRS. BES- 



Mi \km km s ni rsing '20; l>l< I 

III KM \\. \\ II Will ION WHITEFl 

I \\\ JO; MISS \ IF((,INI \ ( UNI I 1 , MEDI 

(ini 53; Kdiii i< i i < <ii i, iii \n ii< 

I \\\ '24. DR, III Kill Kl D I INN. \Mi.s I 

mi >i rs, .ill ol Baltimore .ill responsi 
hie lot Baltimore 



B. J. Borreson Appointed 

Dean for Student Life 

B. I. BORRESON, ISSISTANI Dl \n hi 

Harvard University's Graduate School 
ol Business Administration, has been 
appointed Executive Dean for Student 
Life and assumed his office January 15. 

Dr. Elkins, in announcing Mi 
Borreson's appointment, said: 

■'As the enrollment of the University 
increases there is a more pressing nui:^ 
to expand services to the students and 
to coordinate the offices now dealing 
with several aspects of student life. I he 
University should give first priority to 
the needs of the students and in a 
complex organization it is desirable to 
have one individual whose primary 
function is to plan, supervise and co- 
ordinate the efforts to meet these needs. 
This is the purpose of the Office of 
Executive Dean for Student Life. 

"Mr. Borreson will be directly re- 
sponsible to the President, in a line 
position, with the following offices re- 
sponsible to him: Counseling Center. 
Dean of Women. Dean of Men. Student 
Welfare, Placement. Foreign Student 
Advisement. Office of Intermediate 
Registrations and On Trial Admissions. 
Student Union, and Student Health. The 
Executive Dean will participate in the 
administration of certain aspects of 
food services, and will work closely 
with the Office of Scholarships and 
Grants-in-Aid. He will also have a close 
relationship with those other University 
offices which provide the many neces- 
sary services and supervision that affect 
student welfare and morale. He will 
naturally have a direct interest in the 
policies established by faculty commit- 
tees and the work and activities of our 
many student organizations and enter- 
prises." 

Mr. Borreson was born in Duluth. 
Minnesota, and received his Bachelor of 
Arts degree from University College. 
University of Minnesota. Following his 
graduation. Mr. Borreson served at the 
University as Director of Student Acti- 
vities ami also as Executive Secretary to 
the Faculty Committee on Student \i 
lairs. He was also a member of the 
Faculty Committee on Recreation and 
( Continued on I'a.^e 24 ) 

19 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



Twenty-Four Lettermen Return to Spring Football Drills 



Fifty-five varsity football candi- 
dates will report to Tommy Mont, 
Head Football Coach, the morning of 
March 8 to open spring drills for the 
1958 season. Spring practice will close 
April 12 with the annual Varsity- 
Alumni game in Byrd Stadium. 

Mont plans to work four days a 
week, weather permitting, and to 
utilize a Saturday session as an intra- 
squad scrimmage. 

The Terps, 5-5 for the 1957 season, 
have 24 lettermen returning. Thirteen 
have graduated from the '57 team. 
Most notable loss will be at center 
where Gene Alderton and Wilbur Main 
provided the Terps with top center 
play. Also missing will be ends Ed 
Cooke and Bill Turner; tackles Don 
Healy and Tom Stefl; guards Ron 
Athey, Paul Tonetti, and Nick De- 
Cicco; quarterback John Fritsch, and 
halfbacks Fred Hamilton, Howie Dare, 
and Ralph Hawkins. 

Mont believes his 1958 squad, if all 
return for the fall drills September 1, 
will be as good as and possibly better 
than the 1957 team. He believes the 
change in the substitution rule will help 
the Terrapins this fall. 

The Terrapins have a good nucleus 
returning at each position along with 
some outstanding newcomers. Return- 
ing at end will be Ben Scotti, Long 
Branch, New Jersey; Ron Shaffer, Cum- 
berland; Al Beardsley, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania; Bill Martin, Kittanning, Penn- 
sylvania; and Bill Steppe, Cumberland. 
Tackles returning are co-captain Fred 
Cole, Newark, New Jersey; J. Kurt 
Schwarz, Hackensack, New Jersey; 
Tom Flor, Elizabeth, New Jersey; and 
Joe Gardi, Harrison, New Jersey. The 
guard position appears strong with all- 
America candidate Rodney Breedlove, 
Cumberland, leading the returnees. 
Breedlove received honorable mention 
all-America last season as a sophomore 
and was named to the all-Conference 
teams. At the other guard is Tom 
Gunderman. Franklin. New Jersey 
named to the second team all-Confer- 
ence selections. Other guard lettermen 
include Ron Laneve. Pittsburgh and 
Fred Kern. Baltimore. Jim Hatter, 

20 



Rome, New York, fullback his soph 
and junior years, has been moved to 
the guard position for spring drills. 

Victor Schwartz, Port Reading, New 
Jersey, a guard letterman last year as 
a soph, has been moved to the center 
position as number one pivot man. 

The Terps have nine backs returning, 
led by quarterbacks Dickie Lewis, 
Martinsburg, West Virginia and co- 
captain Bob Rusevlyan, Washington. 
Lewis, number one singal caller last 
fall, is not expected to participate in 
any contact work during spring drills 
because of an illness contacted during 
the semester vacation. 



Phil perlo, Washington, and jim 
Joyce, Philadelphia, give the Terps 
two outstanding experienced fullbacks. 
Five top halfbacks return, led by 
seniors Bob Layman, Pittsburgh and 
Ted Kershner, Martinsburg, West Vir- 
ginia. Backing them up are senior Joe 
Behrmann, Hackensack. New Jersey, 
and juniors Gene Varardi, Freeport, 
Pennsylvania, and John Forbes, Bask- 
ing Ridge, New Jersey. 

The names that should be heard most 
from last year's B team and freshman 
team are ends Vincent Scott, Wilming- 
ton, Delaware, Tony Scotti, brother of 
first team end, Ben; tackle Ed Nickla, 
North Merrick, New York, and an Air 
Force veteran; guards Ron Binetti, 
Baltimore, and Pete Boinis, Washington; 
and centers Leroy Dietrich, Phila- 
delphia, and Lou Ingram. Pittsburgh. 

In the backfield. Mont and his staff 
hold high hopes for quarterback Dick 
Scarbath, Baltimore. The brother of 
former Terp all-America Jack Scar- 
bath, the 6-2. 190-pound sophomore 
has exhibited great all-around potential 
while leading the B squad last fall. 
Another top B team quarterback is Dale 
Betty. Butler, Pennsylvania. Up from 
the freshman team are two fine pros- 
pects, Harry Manclski, Wilmington, and 
Jim Head, Westminster. 

Main new halfbacks lend themselves 
to the picture with B teamcr John 
Stitt. Pittsburgh, heading the list. From 
the frosh unit, Mont believes he will 



/eral 



get a great deal of depth in several 
boys who figure to be pushing the 
veterans. They include Everett Cloud, 
Falls Church, Virginia; Dwayne Fletch- 
er, Front Royal, Virginia; Bob Gal- 
lagher, Pittsburgh; Ken Houser. Pal- 
myra, Pennsylvania, and Dave Stock- 
man, Baltimore. 

Maryland continued to dominate 
the Winter Championships in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference, just as it 
had done in the fall sports. Last spring, 
the Red and White took three of the 
five titles, and hopes are high that 
the athletic program will continue 
bringing glad tidings to the University. 

Jim Kehoe's indoor track team de- 
fended its Conference championship in 
the title event held at the University 
of North Carolina. Led by their 
great distance star Burr Grim, the 
Terps dominated the indoor games by 
capturing seven of the 13 titles. Grim 
set two new marks in the meet. He 
won the mile in 4:12.5, three seconds 
better than the old record set in 1955. 
He took the 2-mile in the fine time of 
9:21.9, also three seconds better than 
the old mark. This capped a great 
career for Grim wearing the Maryland 
colors. All his future races will be run 
as an unattached entry inasmuch as 
he graduated in February and now is 
in Graduate School. His collegiate 
participation eligibility ended with the 
class of the indoor season. 

Other firsts were recorded by Elliott 
Thompson in the broad jump; Tom 
Tait, high jump; John Lowndes in the 
600-yard run; Don Whittaker, 60-yard 
dash; and the two-mile relay team of 
Charles Fleming, David Rams, Jack 
West, and Leroy Harvey. 

The Terps finished well ahead of 
arch-rival North Carolina. 53 2/5 to 
29 1/5. 

The wrestlers of Coach Sully K rouse 
once again dominated the ACC with 
its fifth consecutive conference team 
championship. The title was sewed up 
as they defeated Duke in the final dual 
meet, 32-0. The Terps haven't lost a 
dual meet in the five years of competi- 
(Continued on page 22) 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



VARSITY TEAM SPORTS SCHEDULE 1958 



S I 1 R I N (i 



S l M M I R 



\l I 





FOOTBALL 






BASLBAI.l 






1 \( ROSSI 




DATE OP PON IN I 


PI ACE 


DATE 


OPPON1 N I 


I'l U 1 


l>\ 1 1 


OFPON1 N I 


I'l \( 1 


SEPT 






\l \K< II 






M \K< 1 






20 


Wake Forest 




28 


( lonnecticul 


Home 


22 


\it Washington 


There 




ai Winston-Salt 


m. N. C. 


31 


1 )ai imoulh 


Home 


M'KII 






27 


North Carolina State 


W'RII 






2 


l'i inceton 


Homi 




at Raleigh, /V. c. 


1 


University of Maine 


llllllll 


10 


( olgate 


Home 


OCT 






4 


South Carolina 


There 


12 


Washington <v 1 ee 


ll, fin, 


4 


Clemson 




5 


Clemson 


There 


16 


Penn State 


Then 




a! College Park 


Md. 


7 


Duke 


There 


19 


Virginia 


There 


11 


Texas A. & M. 




10 


George Washington 


Home 


2f. 


\;i\ J 


Homi 




at College Park 


, Md. 


1 1 


Hopkins 


There 


M \> 






18 


North Carolina 




14 


South Carolina 


Home 


3 


Duke 


There 




at Chapel Hill. 


N. C. 


15 


Clemson 


Home 


13 


l oyola 


Home 


25 


Auburn 




19 


Georgetown 


There 


17 


Hopkins 


1 here 




at Auburn, Ala 




21 


Duke 


Home 


Coache, 


1 \< K 1 Mil K 




NOV 

1 


South Carolina 
at College Park 


. Md. 


n 
30 

M U 


North Carolina State 
Virginia 


Home 

There \ 




\l III \(,Y 




8 


Navy* 




1 


North Carolina State 


Then- 










at Baltimore, Md. 


1 


North Carolina 


There 








14 


Miami, Fla. 
at Miami, Fla. 




3 

5 


Wake Forest 

Navy 


There 
There 








22 


Virginia 




10 


Wake Forest 


Home 










at Charlottesville, Va. 


12 


North Carolina 


Home 








Coach: tommy mont 




15 


Georgetown 


Home 














17 


Virginia 


Home 










*Marylan 


d Home Game 1 




















Coach: 


H. BURTON SHIPLEY 












OUTDOOR TRACK 




TENNIS 






GOLF 




DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


MARCH 






APRIL 






MARCH 




29 


Florida Relays 


There 


2 


M. I. T. 


Home 


31 


Clemson 


There 


APRIL 






3 


M. I. T. 


Home 


APRIL 






3 


Virginia 


Home 


9 


Clemson 


There 


1 


South Carolina 


There 


12 


Georgetown 


There 


10 


South Carolina 


There 


3-4-5 


Miami Invitational 


There 


19 


North Carolina 


There 


15 


Virginia 


Home 


1 1 


Virginia 


Home 


24 


Duke 


Home 


17 


George Washington 


Home 


14 


North Carolina State Home 


25 


Penn. Relays 


There 


19 


Penn State 


There 


16 


Georgetown 


There 


26 


Penn. Relays 


There 


21 


Georgetown 


Home 


22 


George Washington 


Home 


29 


A. A. U. 


Maryland 


25 


Wake Forest 


Home 


25 


Duke 


There 


MAY 






26 


North Carolina 


Home 


26 


North Carolina 


There 


3 


Navy 


Home 


30 


Navy 


There 


28 


Wake Forest 


Home 


9-10 


A. C. 


Duke 


MAY 






MAY 






30-31 


A. C. AAAA 


Villanova 


2 


North Carolina State 


There 


3 


Navy 


Home 


Coach: jim kehoe 




3 


Duke 


There 


6 


Hopkins 


There 








6 


Hopkins 


Home 


9-10 


A. C. C. 


Win. -Salem 








8-9-10 


A. C. Conference 


Chapel Hill 


Coach: 


FRANK H. CRONIN 










Coach: 


30YLE ROYAL 











FINAL STATISTICS 1957-58 BASKETBALL 



TEAM RECORD 



VIARY 


LAND 


OPPONENT 


64 


GEORGE WASHINGTON 


55 


61 


FORDHAM 


58 


71 


KENTUCKY 


62 


72 


WAKE FOREST 


58 


88 


NAVY 


58 


71 


VANDERBILT 


56 


46 


Memphis State 


47-Triple 


11 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


59 Overtime 


66 


Clemson 


73 


74 


DUKE 


49 


74 


NORTH CAROLINA 


61 


55 


GEORGETOWN 


45 


48 


N. C. State 


57 


64 


NAVY 


51 


87 


VIRGINA 


66 


74 


WAKE FOREST 


67 


72 


CLEMSON 


54 


64 


N. C. State 


69-Triple 


69 


VIRGINIA 


56 Overtime 


59 


Duke 


68 


59 


North Carolina 


66 


56 


GEORGETOWN 


46 


99 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


59 


talics 


indicate team winning over Maryland. 







INDIVIDUAL RECORDS 












G 


Field 

Arts 


Goals 
Made 


Pet. 


Fn 

A its 


>e Thr 
Made 


YWS 
Pit. 


Ret 


omuls 


Total 
Pts. 


A Vg. 


'CHARLES MCNEIL 


23 


269 


114 


.424 


94 


70 


.745 


160 




298 


13.0 


NICK DAVIS 


23 


252 


1 14 


.452 


43 


30 


.697 


62 




258 


1 1.: 


.AL BUNGE 


23 


234 


95 


.406 


90 


50 


.555 


210 




240 


10.4 


I.IOHN NACINCIK 


22 


188 


71 


.378 


92 


68 


.739 


117 




210 


9.5 


ITOM YOUNG 


17 


122 


48 


.393 


99 


71 


.616 


94 




167 


9.S 


|GENE DANKO 


22 


75 


28 


.373 


49 


38 


.776 


41 




94 


4.3 


| JERRY BECKTLE 


23 


74 


31 


.419 


40 


16 


.400 


43 




78 


3.4 


I.IIM HALLECK 


17 


35 


17 


.486 


51 


31 


.608 


48 




65 


3.8 


IjULIAN WEINGARTEN 


17 


29 


15 


.517 


37 


29 


.784 


36 




59 


3.5 


JERRY SHANAHAN 


15 


17 


12 


.706 


26 


15 


.575 


1 1 




39 


2.6 


JbILL MURPHY 


15 


32 


9 


.281 


15 


12 


.800 


30 




2S 


1.9 


.PETE KRUKAR 


16 


10 


4 


.400 


10 


9 


.900 


8 




17 


I.I 


1 PERRY MOORE 


21 


19 


3 


.158 


10 


7 


.700 


28 




13 


.6 


\Own Team Totals 


23 


1359 


561 


.412 


658 


441 


.670 


928 


(40.3) 


1565 


68.4 


\Opponenis Totals 


23 


1299 


443 


.341 


576 


385 


.668 


782 


(34.0) 


1340 


58.3 



MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



21 




By Victor Holm, Field Secretary 

Publicity Chairmen should Address Reports 

of Meetings and Activities to Mr. Holm, 

Alumni Association, Administration Building, 

University of Maryland, College Park. Maryland 



The University of Maryland Alumni 
Club of Baltimore entertained the Board 
of Regents of the University at a lunch- 
eon on February 14th at the Belvedere 
Hotel. 

Sam 1 Silber, President of the Balti- 
more Club, was the Chairman of the 
affair which was attended by 150 
graduates of the University's various 
colleges and their friends. 

Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of 
the Board of Regents, introduced the 
members of the Board. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. President of 
the University, was the main speaker 
and talked on future plans for the Uni- 
versity, both for the professional schools 
of Baltimore and at College Park. He 
touched on the accreditation program; 
the building program: the fund raising 
program and the budget. 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin was 
among the distinguished guests and 
spoke briefly on the budget being con- 
sidered by the State Legislature. 

Mrs. John Paul Troy of the Balti- 
more Club, was Program Chairman 
and her supporting committee members 
were Sam Goldstein, William Hucksoll, 
Miss Lorraine Neel, Miss Flora Streett, 
Dr. B. Olive Cole, Donald Peacock, 
John Lampe and James Proctor. 

The next affair of the Baltimore Club 
will be the annual meeting to be held 
at the 104th Medical Armory in May 
and plans are underway for a summer 
meeting to be held on an Ice Breaker 
in Chesapeake Bay early in July. The 
summer meeting will be open to mem- 
bers and their friends. 

ACC CLUB WELCOMES MARYLAND 

ALUMNI 

Under an agreement just concluded 
between the officers of the Maryland 
Alumni Association and the Atlantic 
Coast Conference Club of Washing- 
ton, D. C, 1349 E St., N. W., all 
Maryland alumni who have paid 
their dues will be entitled to the use 
of the full facilities of the ACC 
Club. There will be no obligation 
of any kind. Lunch and dinner are 
served daily. The Club is open daily 
from noon until 2 a. m. and from 
noon until midnight on Saturdays 
and Sundays. It will provide a pleas- 
ant meeting place for Maryland men 
and women in the downtown Wash- 
ington area. 



For further information, contact 
Alumni Secretary Dave Brigham or 
call the Secretary of the ACC Club at 
STerling 3-9740, Washington, D. C. 
exchange. 

CUMBERLAND ELECTS 

The Allegany-Garrett County Alumni 
Club has named James Reford Aldridge. 
'54, of Frostburg its new President. He 
succeeds D. J. Russell Cook. '23. of 
Cumberland who concluded several 
years at the helm as toastmaster for a 
banquet at the Cumberland Country 
Club attended by nearly one hundred 
alumni. 

Other officers elected were Dr. Albert 
Cook, '33, Frostburg, Vice-President: 
and Miss Mary Murray. '29, Mt. 
Savage, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of 
the University, was the guest speaker. 
He centered his comments upon two 
forces now at work. The first was 
described as a greater interest in educa- 
tion than ever before at the so-called 
higher level. Competition for oppor- 
tunity is responsible for the increased 
percentage heading for college. Second, 
the increase in population indicates that 
a 75 to 100% increase in enrollment is 
inevitable. 

Dr. Elkins stated the University must 
be somewhat more selective to meet 
this potential while at the same time 
assuring an opportunity to all with the 
ability to go further. By 1970 the 
student population will double the 
10,500 now on the College Park cam- 
pus. He said, "The democratic way is 
to accept those who may be a gamble 
or marginal, but once they come we 
must be sure they meet the standards of 
performance which will assure a reason- 
able level of accomplishment." 

On the subject of the University 
Faculty, the need for quality was 
stressed with working conditions that 
will enable them to do a good job of 
teaching and research. Physical facili- 
ties on a ten year plan are to be ex- 
panded more than ever before to meet 
increased enrollment and to provide 
area expansion in Baltimore. 

The alumni role was summarized as 
calling for moral and reasonable finan- 
cial support with the admonition they 
should be more concerned about the 
welfare of the University than any other 



group. It is the alumni who must 
interpret the University to the general 
public. Dr. Elkins said, '"We are not 
going to suffer from any lack of stu- 
dents, but we may suffer from our fair 
share of the type we deserve. Alumni 
can work with these students and en- 
courage them to enter Maryland. In 
some cases, you can provide the finan- 
cial lift they need or arouse the com- 
munity to give them assistance and 
encouragement. These deserving stu- 
dents can best be identified and per- 
haps best helped at the local level." 

His concluding challenge was. "With 
an active alumni organization we can 
do a much better job and make you 
even more proud of your University." 



24 Lettermen Return 
Continued from page 20 

tion. Junior Nick Biondi led the Terps 
who were going into the ACC cham- 
pionships in Cole Field House the big 
favorite. 

The swimming team of Coach Bill 
Campbell finished its second season 
with an impressive third-place showing. 
The Terps had a chance to cop second 
place with a win over Duke in their 
final meet, but the Blue Devils won in 
the Cole pool. 

In the ACC championships, as usual, 
North Carolina won. However, new- 
comer Maryland did have seven of its 
performers win places as did the 400- 
yard medley relay team. 

Coach bud millikan's terrapins, 
featured in another section of the 
issue had the second best regular sea- 
son mark in ten years of Millikan's 
coaching with a 17-6 record. They 
were considered the darkhorse possi- 
bility in the tournament. Bob O'Brien's 
freshman team, 8-7 for the year, had 
two boys who are definite candidates 
for Millikan's team next year. Paul 
Jelus and Bruce Kelleher furnished the 
baby Terps with outstanding play each 
game. Jelus, Camden, New Jersey, led 
the scoring with 311 points for a 20.7 
average while Kelleher, Wilmington, 
Delaware, hit for 232 for a 15.5 aver- 
age. 



22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ALUMNI 

SPRING 

REUNIONS 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 



Campus Notes 
Continued from page 5 



TRIBUTES TO JUDGE COLE INSERTED 
IN CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

Judge William P. Cole, beloved and 
honored member of the Board of 
Regents, who passed away September 
22, 1957, received praise in the House 
of Representatives for his career as an 
outstanding servant of the people. The 
remarks of his friends in the House 
have been preserved for posterity in 
the January 15 issue of the Congres- 
sional Record. 

Mr. George H. Fallon, Representa- 
tive of Maryland's Fourth District, 
stated, in part, "Judge Cole was a true 
Marylander. True to his ideals, loyal 
to his country and fellow man, and 
dedicated to service, his memory will 
forever be enshrined in our hearts as 
one who measured up to the very 
highest traditions of our State." 

Joining his colleague in praise of 
Judge Cole was Mr. Samuel N. Friedel 
of Maryland's Seventh District. Con- 
cerning Judge Cole's service to the House 
of Representatives, Mr. Friedel said, 
"Those of us who have known him and 
worked with him over the years and 
have observed his demeanor, whether in 
proceedings before committees or on 
the floor of the House of Representa- 
tives, have been deeply impressed by 
his devotion to the public welfare. He 
was indeed a truly dedicated legislator." 

Majority Leader, Mr. John W. Mc- 
Cormack of Massachusetts, joined the 
Representatives from Maryland in pay- 
ing respect to the late Judge Cole. 
About his former colleague, he stated, 
"Lawyer, legislator, jurist, university 
regent — his resources seemed limitless. 
But what we will never forget are those 
personal qualities that so endeared him 
to us — his unfailing courtesy and 
patience, his tolerance of the opinions 
of others, his kindness and good 
humor." 

Mr. Richard E. Lankford, Fifth Dis- 
trict, and Mr. Edward A. Garmatz of 
the Third District, joined their col- 
leagues in expressing the great loss felt 



by all at the passing oi Judge William 
P, Cole, Jr. 

DR. v> l Bl i< W\ \kdi l) 
IKI GB \di hi i i i i o\\ 

On the eve of National I ngineer's 
Week, Dr. Joseph Weber, Professor oi 

Electrical Engineering, received the 
grade of Eellovv from the Washington 
Section of The Institute of Radio 
Engineers at their annual banquet, 
February 15. 

The grade of Fellow is the highest 
membership grade offered by the IRE 
and is bestowed only by invitation to 
those who have made outstanding con- 
tributions to radio engineering or allied 
fields. 

Dr. Weber was cited by the IRE 
"for his early recognition of concepts 
leading to the development of the 
'Maser' ("Maser' is the designation for 
'microwave amplification by stimulated 
emission of radiation' and is a term ap- 
plied to a new class of microwave radio 
devices still in the development 
stages)." 

Ira B. Stanley, of Frederick, and 
William J. Ulrick, of College Park, both 
students at the University, were among 
six students from the Washington area 
honored by the Washington Section of 
IRE for their contributions to the three 
student branches of the Washington 
Section. 

ADULT EDUCATION INSTITUTE 

Among the programs being planned by 
the College of Special and Continua- 



tion Studies this summer is the Adult 
Education Institute foi the Maryland 
Federation ol Women's ( lubs Mn I 
Elmo Brogdon, ( hail man ol the I 
cute, states thai last summei s Vdull 

Education Institute was most sua 

tul and that the Federation is pi. inning 

to make it an annual atlail 

East summer's Institute, which ran 
from Wednesday evening June 26 
through Friday June 28, covered such 
topics as effective public speaking, 

Maryland history, parliamentary pro- 
cedure, profitable discussion, and 

planned programs ol work. I ach topic 
Was made the subject ot an addicss In 

an outstanding professional in the 

various fields. 

Questionnaires returned at the close 
of the first session indicated great satis- 
faction on the part of the 100 persons 
who attended. 

DR. HI AMIR ON BOARD 

It has been announced by Dr. Walter 
J. Murphy of Washington. D. C. that 
five outstanding scientists have been 
appointed to the advisory board of 
Analytical Chemistry, monthly publica- 
tion of the American Chemical Society. 
Among the new members of the 
board is Dr. William H. Beamer, M. S. 
Chemistry '41, Head of the Radio- 
chemistry Laboratory and Assistant Di- 
rector of the Spectroscopy Laboratory 
of the Dow Chemical Company. Mid- 
land, Michigan. 

(Continued on next page) 




Mrs. Mildred Hugg, of Baltimore. House Director for Harford and Prince Georges Halls, 
men's dormitories at College Park, was voted "outstanding House Director of 1957" 
and received the Phi Kappa Tail "Battle-Axe". 

Presentation was made by Nicholas Keek, right, fraternity President, as John Koshak 
looks on. 



MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



23 



MR. DODGE ALUMNUS 
OF RUSSIAN RESEARCH CENTER 

The Russian Research Center. Harvard 
University, has puhlished a list of 
"alumni" who have joined in its pioneer- 
ing ten-year history since its estab- 
lishment in 1948. These alumni are 
now serving in 43 colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the United States; 
some are teaching abroad and still 
others are employed by the Federal 
government. 

The Center's only alumnus at the 
University of Maryland is Norton T. 
Dodge. Instructor in Economics. Mr. 
Dodge was a graduate Fellow at the 
Center, 1951-52, 1953-56. 

NAMED PRESIDENT OF 

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

Frederick William Giggey, 13 Somerset 
Road. Levington, Massachusetts, has 
been named President of the student 
Association at the Harvard Business 
School. Captain Giggey is in the Signal 
Corps, and is a sixteen-year Army 
veteran. In 1956 he received his B. S. 
from the University of Maryland. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold F. 
Giggey of Watertown, Massachusetts. 

The Student Association of the Har- 
vard Business School accepts the pri- 



mary responsibility for such questions 
as parking, athletics, publications, so- 
cial functions, formulation and enforce- 
ment of regulations, and the mainte- 
nance of effective channels of com- 
munication among students. Faculty and 
administration. The Executive Board 
and ten committees carry on the day-to- 
day work of the more than one-thou- 
sand man Association. Membership is 
voluntary and open to all students. 



B. J. Borreson 

Continued from page 19 



the Board of Control of Student Publi- 
cations. From 1947 until 1954, Mr. 
Borreson was Advisor to the University 
Congress. In 1954 he was given the 
Faculty Recognition Award by the stu- 
dent body. 

At Harvard University, Mr. Borreson 
served in the following administrative 
positions in the Graduate School of 
Business Administration: Assistant 
Dean and member of t he Senior 
Faculty, Secretary to the Faculty, Di- 
rector of Financial Aid, Associate Di- 
rector of Admissions, Executive Secre- 
tary to the Academic Performance 



Committee, Coordinator of Relations 
with Undergraduate Colleges and Uni- 
versities. 

Mr. Borreson is the author of several 
publications and is a member of a 
number of professional organizations 
concerned with various aspects of per- 
sonnel administration. 



Dr. Kuhn Appointed 
Continued from page 15 






Professor and Head, Agronomy Depart- 
ment. He served as Assistant to the 
President from July, 1955 until his ap- 
pointment as Executive Vice President 
of the University. 

His professional activities include 
being a member of National Seed 
Stocks Advisory Committee from 1948 
to 1952, a member of the National 
Committee on Climatology Advisory to 
the U. S. Weather Bureau appointed 
by the National Science Foundation 
during 1955 to 1958, President of the 
Northeastern Weed Control Conference, 
1955, and President Northeastern Sec- 
tion. American Society of Agronomy, 
1954. 

Dr. Kuhn is married and has five 
children: four sons and one daughter. 




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ZA 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



15,000 Roaring Fans 

Continued from page Id 



Charles McNeil. 6-6. have provided 
that needed height the Terps have 
needed since Millikan came to College 
Park in 1950. Their efforts have been 
steadied by the veteran play of seniors 
Nick Davis, John Nacincik. and service 
returnee Tom Young. 

Doc Weingarten. Jerry Bechtle, Perrj 
Moore. Gene Danko, Pete Krukar. 
Jerry Shanahan. Jim Halleck, and Bill 
Murphy provide the Terps with the 
strongest bench they ever have had. It 
was the work of Weingarten that helped 
so much in the upset win over Carolina. 

The big crowd raised the root' as the 
Terrapins lead mounted in the second 
halt and at one point, there was a 20- 
point spread. This was the most a 
Frank McGuire team had trailed an- 
other team in five years. 

The game was billed as a defensive 
battle between the two most defense- 
conscious teams in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference, but it was the Maryland 
man-for-man defense that was the 
sharpest. 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 

The year 1957 fired both barrels in 
honoring Roy W. Lennartson, Deputy 
Administrator of AMS. 

In May, he received the Department's 
Distinguished Service Award "for his 
judgment, foresight, and leadership in 
developing and administering a fully 
integrated marketing service program 
covering market news, grading and in- 
spection, regulatory, surplus removal, 
and food distribution activities." 

In October, he was awarded a 
scholarship by the American Manage- 
ment Association for four weeks of in- 
tensive management study in New York 
City. The scholarship is one of eight 
given by AMA each year to top-level 
Federal employees who have shown 
exceptional administrative ability. 

Mr. Lennartson's versatility as an ad- 
ministrator has been well demonstrated 
in the 21 years since he joined the De- 
partment as an employee of the FCA's 
Dairy and Poultry Section. Whether he 
is conducting a meeting, appearing at 
a congressional hearing, making a 
(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



Do You Have A Plan? 

Do you have a definite plan for your family's 
future security — regardless of what tomorrow ma] 
brinj>? Have you thought of such a plan at times 
only to put it aside because of the pressure of other 
matters? 

Our experience as executor and trustee of many 
estates may be of help to you in benefiting your 
family and others in the years to come. 

We shall be glad to discuss this matter with you 
and vour attorney at any time. 




OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
& SONS CO. 

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PLaza 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



PESTS? 



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22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



25 



speech, or discussing technical market- 
ing problems « ith a division director, 
he is efficient and effective and still 
maintains the friendly manner for 
which he is well known. 

A native of Carlton County, Minn., 
he attended public schools there and 
was active in 4-H Club work. After at- 
tending the School of Agriculture in 
Minneapolis, he was assistant county 
agent of Carlton County in 1930 and 
1931. He completed his college train- 
ing at the University of Maryland 
where he received a Master of Science 
degree in Agricultural Economics and 
Marketing in 1936. 

He served as a procurement officer 
for the Army Quartermaster Corps for 
three years during World War 11 and 
returned to USDA in 1945 to be As- 
sistant Director of the PMA poultry 
branch. He was appointed Assistant Ad- 
ministrator of PMA in 1951. and when 
AMS was established in 1953 he was 
named Deputy Administrator for 
marketing services. 

His family consists of his wife Ethel 
and 14-year-old daughter Kathy. They 
live in Silver Spring, Md. 

NICE JOB 

J. Bernard Robb, 1899, is the official 
liquor taster for the State of Virginia. 
Bernie likes his job, so there is no rea- 
son for other alumni to make an ap- 
plication. 

Each month the laboratory of the 
Alcoholic Beverage Control Board, 



which is presided over by Robb, runs 
tests on over 200 samples of alcoholic 
beverage drawn from purchases com- 
ing into the Board's warehouse. These 
tests are the State's way of guaranteeing 
the standards and quality of liquor sold 
in Virginia. 

As Chemical Director of the lab since 
it was started in 1934, Robb said, "It 
is the chemists' responsibility to detect 
adulteration of any violation of specifi- 
cations established by law." 

But chemistry does not provide all 
the tests an alcoholic beverage must un- 
dergo before it meets the lab's approval. 
Robb must sample wines and whiskies 
for taste — an important factor in their 
saleability. Robb is Virginia's official 
liquor taster. 

MARVIN L. SPECK HONORED BY N. C. 

M. L. Speck, Professor of Dairy 
Bacteriology, Dairy Manufacturing Sec- 
tion, Animal Industry Department, 
North Carolina State College, Raleigh, 
has recently been honored by being ap- 
pointed to the William Neal Reynolds 
Distinguished Professorship in Dairy 
Bacteriology, The Distinguished Profes- 
sorship is the highest honor bestowed 
upon professors in the School of Agri- 
culture, North Carolina State College, 
who have distinguished themselves in 
research, scholarship and performance. 
The Distinguished Professorships are 
made possible by an endowment con- 
tributed by the late Willam N. Reynolds 
of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Com- 



pany. Dr. Speck is a member of the 
Editorial Board of the Journal of Dairy 
Science. 

Members of the Animal Industry De- 
partment staff who have previously been 
named recipients of the William Neal 
Reynolds Distinguished Professorships 
are George H. Wise, Head, Animal 
Nutrition Section, and J. E. Legates, 
Head, Dairy Husbandry Section. 

WITH THE ENTOMOLOGISTS 

The Board of Regents has appointed 
William E. Bickley Professor and Head 
of the Department of Entomology, and 
George E. Langford State Entomolo- 
gist. 

Dr. Cory, former Head of the De- 
partment, returned from British Guiana 
in June. He and Mrs. Cory are enjoying 
a leisurely retirement. 

Arthur S. Kidwell joined the staff as 
Entomologist on Mosquito Control. 

Mr. A. B. Gahan. M.S. 1907, was 
elected to honorary membership in the 
Entomological Society of Washington. 

Dr. Sam C. Munson •"retired" after 
eleven years as Lecturer in Insect 
Physiology. His full-time position at the 
George Washington University and his 
work as coach to the District of Colum- 
bia Fencer's Club gave him such a 
heavy schedule that he felt it unwise to 
continue his teaching here. Dr. Jack 
Colvard Jones of the National Institutes 
of Health has accepted the lectureship 
and will start his course in February. 
Dr. Jones holds decrees from Alabama 




26 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Polytechnic Institute (Auburn) and 
Iowa State College. He is well-known 
for his work on insect blood, the effect 
of insecticides on mosquito larvae, and 
other research in physiology and toxi- 
cology. 

Henry F. Howden is in Insect Identi- 
fication for Science Service, Ottawa, 
Canada. 

John Sanjean is with Shell Develop- 
ment Company and lives at 121 Fair- 
view Avenue, Modesta, California. 

Two more of our entomology stu- 
dents have been claimed by the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture: Henry A. 
Highland is at Savannah. Georgia, and 
Russell G. Dent, The University of Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wisconsin. 

MR. JESTER A DIRECTOR 

W. Clayton Jester, '21, Biglerville, 
Pennsylvania is on the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Baltimore Bank for Co- 
operatives and participated in the an- 
nual meeting of the cooperatives at Bal- 
timore. (Does he remember when he 
fell from the roof of Calvert Hall in 
1920, during a water-bag battle, and 
lived to tell about it?) 

BRYANT COUNTY AGENT 

Allen B. Bryant, '53, dairy production, 
has been appointed County Agricultural 
Agent for Somerset County. Bryant is 
a native son of Maryland who came up 
through the ranks of Extension. Born 
and reared in Montgomery he was an 
Assistant County Agent in Cecil Coun- 
ty for three years, then moved to St. 
Mary's for several months before mov- 
ing into his present post on the Eastern 
Shore at Princess Anne on December 1, 
1957. 

MOOREFIELD DEVELOPS INSECTICIDE 

Dr. Herbert H. Moorefield, '51, has re- 
cently played an important part in the 
development of the insecticidal pro- 
perties of N-methyl-1-naphthyl car- 
bamate which will be known under 
the trade name of Sevin. Dr. Moore re- 
ceived his Ph.D. at the University of 
Illinois in 1954 and is employed by the 
Carbide and Carbon Chemical Com- 
pany at the Boyce Thompson Institute 
for Plant Research at Yonkers, New 
York. Sevin shows great promise against 
several pests of crops. Dr. C. Graham 
at the Entomology — Horticulture Field 
Station at Hancock says that Sevin 
works like a miracle against the periodi- 
cal cicada. The new material is less toxic 
to higher animals than the chlorinated 
hydrocarbons or organic phosphates. It 
is expected to be extremely valuable in 
fighting insects which are resistant to 
older insecticides. 

(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



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27 



BURNS HONORED 

Carroll County Annual Farm Bureau 
Meeting turned out to be a "This is 
your Life" program to honor L. C. 
Burns. The Farm Bureau, Grange, Soil 
Conservation District Supervisors and 
several service clubs joined in honoring 
Mr. Burns in recognition of his 30 
years as their beloved county agent. 

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 

Harry W. Beggs, county agent in 
Dorchester County for 14 years, re- 
ceived the Distinguished Service Award 
at the National Association of County 
Agricultural Agents meeting in Boston. 

Mr. Beggs, a veteran of almost 22 
years in extension work, was born in 
Maryland, has spent his entire profes- 
sional career in the State and except for 
graduate work at Pennsylvania State 
University received his education in 
Maryland institutions. He was born in 
Westminster, November 28, 1902, and 
was graduated from the University of 
Maryland in 1928 with a B.S. degree. 

His career in agricultural education 
started in Accident, soon after his grad- 
uation from the University. He taught 
vocational agriculture there from 1928 
to 1935. 

Mr. Beggs' first appointment as an 
extension worker was as assistant coun- 
ty agent in Allegany, Garret and Wash- 
ington counties in December, 1935. He 
has served as county agent in Dorches- 
ter County since June 16, 1943. 

BRIEFS 

Robert H. Benson, '43, Linwood, is with 



the Farmers Home Administration at 
Frederick. 

Robert Jones, '50, has changed from 
assistant county agent for Dorchester 
County to associate county agent in 
Carroll County. 

Dr. Claron O. Hesse, Ph.D. '38, has 
been appointed Head of the Depart- 
ment of Pomology at the University of 
California at Dewis. Dr. Julian C. 
Crane, Ph.D. '42, also from the Uni- 
versity of California, recently visited his 
Department. Dr. Crane is now at the 
Long Ashton Experiment Station in 
England where he is studying growth 
hormones. 

Chester Hitz, Ph.D. '39. in Horticul- 
ture, has transferred from the Univer- 
sity of Delaware to Pennsylvania State 
University as Professor of Pomology. 

Col. Joseph W. Sisson, '30, was pre- 
sented a U.S. Army Infantry Center 
Certificate of Achievement for ex- 
ceptionally meritorious service at Fort 
Benning, Georgia. Col. Sisson is now on 
an assignment in the Republic of 
Vietnam. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Lois Eld Ernest 



MISS HILLIS WILL TEACH 

The 1958 Summer Session will bring to 
the campus one of the outstanding 



names in the field of choral music. 
Margaret Hillis. Director of the Ameri- 
can Concert Choir and Orchestra, will 
be in residence as a Visiting Professor 
and in addition will direct the Choral 
Workshop during the week of July 7-1 1 . 

MR. ULRICH COMPLETES ARTICLES 

Homer Ulrich, Head of the Music De- 
partment, has just completed a series of 
biographical articles for the next issue 
of the World Book Encyclopedia to be 
published in the near future. To help 
alleviate the shortage of teachers, es- 
pecially in public school music, Mr. 
Ulrich will visit a number of Maryland 
high schools to speak on various career 
day programs and to work with the 
vocational counselors in those schools 
to promote a better understanding of 
the occupational possibilities in the 
teaching profession. 

DR. JORDAN ELECTED 

Dr. Bryce Jordan has been elected to 
the Executive Board of the newly 
founded Maryland State Teachers As- 
sociation. He will also supervise the 
Higher Education Program, First An- 
nual Professional Conference of the 
Maryland Music Educators Association 
to be held in Hagerstown, February 21 
and 22, 1958. 

DRAMA GRADUATES MAKE GOOD 

Pernell Roberts, drama major in 1948- 
1949. is now under contract to Warner 
Brothers Studio in Hollywood. Recently 
he appeared in major roles on "Gun- 
smoke" and "Sugar Foot" on television. 



Extra COMFORT 
Extra COURTESY 
Extra SAFETY 

when you travel by 

TRAIL WAYS 

Convenient Service 
or 

CHARTER COACHES 

on trips anywhere — 
anytime. 

For charter quotations, call: 
Trailways, at Baltimore, PLaza 2-2116 
Trailways, at Washington, District 7-4200 




28 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Edward P. Call, '53, is Stage Mana- 
ger for "Pale Horse Pale Rider" at the 
off-Broadway Jan Hus Theatre in New 
York. 

James W. Armacost. '56. has re- 
ceived a fellowship from the University 
of North Carolina where he is work 
ing on a Dramatic Art Master's Degree. 
Before attending the University he was 
assistant technical director on 'The 
Common Glory" and "The Founders" 
at Williamsburg. Virginia. 

NOMINATED FOR CITATION 

Colonel Paul B. Watson. M. A. '52, has 
been nominated for a citation for out- 
standing contribution toward the ad- 
vancement of secondary education to be 
awarded next June in connection with 
the 100th anniversary of the founding 
of Shattuck School, Faribault, Minneso- 
ta. Persons to receive the citations will 
be selected by a committee composed 
of leaders in education, business, and 
industry. 

Colonel Watson, now Associate Di- 
rector of the Patuxent Institution for 
Defective Delinquents. Jessup, Mary- 
land, was Director of Education at the 
Maryland State Penitentiary from 1949 
until accepting his present position last 
May. 

While at the penitentiary he organ- 
ized and directed the academic and vo- 
cational education and research pro- 
grams of the institution. This program 
enabled inmates to earn high school 
equivalence certificates through the 
State Board of Education. Almost 300 
students have received high school 
diplomas as a result. Also, full academic 
credits for completed freshman lecture 
courses were offered by the University 
of Maryland and inmate teacher train- 
ing was conducted by the State Board 
of Education. 

DR. YOUNG PROMOTED 

Edmond G. Young, '38, Ph.D. '43, suc- 
ceeded James W. Libby, Jr., December 
1, 1957, as Manager of Development 
Conferences in the Marketing Research 
Division of the Development Depart- 
ment, the Du Pont Company. Dr. 
Young had been Manager of Sales De- 
velopment in the "Freon" Products 
Division of the Organic Chemicals De- 
partment. He joined the Du Pont Com- 
pany in 1944 as a research chemist at 
its Jackson Laboratory. 

NEW BOOK READY 

The Society of American Bacteriologists 
has recently prepared a book for publi- 
cation by McGraw-Hill Book Com- 
(Continued on page 33) 



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29 



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1223 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EX 3-2778 



By Hazel Hatch Goff 

It's Spring again in Maryland. Christ- 
mas, New Year's Resolutions, The 
Mardi Gras and the 'Big Snow" are 
almost forgotten and we begin to plan 
for the summer. But first comes the 
Metropolitan Opera with all its glamour 
and gala parties on every hand. This 
annual event, bringing to us the great 
renowned artists of today, is a valued 
contribution to the musical and artistic 
life of the community, despite the 
brevity of its stay. 

Traditionally Maryland is rich in his- 
tory, culture and industry with its 
teeming Baltimore port, and there are 
so many interesting places to visit and 
so much pride in the history made here 
— so many things to see — that spring 
opens up a vista of pleasure lined ave- 
nues for those who are not so fortunate 
as to be able to go abroad or even to 
distant parts of our own country. 

Sherwood Gardens, for instance, pro- 
vides the ultimate in beauty as it bursts 
forth in all its glory with the awaken- 
ing of the buds and flowers. Interna- 
tionally known, flower lovers can bask 
in the beauty of a veritable wonder- 



Printlng 



COLONY PRESS 



Lithography 



7 SOUTH GAY STREET 



Baltimore 2, Md. 
William J. Weitzel 



PLaza 2-2358 
J. David Marks 




The emblem of elegant dining 

Eighteen-Steps-Down 

Cozy, intimate bar, serving 
your favorite drinks. 

Continental Dining Room 

for elegant dining 

Fleur-de-Lis Lounge 

Open for luncheon 13 dinner 

Cafe' de Paris 

Sidewalk cafe' 

MISCHANTON'S 

Eastpoinl Shopping Center at Open nightly til 2 a.m. 
Northpoint Rd. 8. Eastern Ave. ample parking 
ATwater 8-0130 



Maryland 



land during the weeks these gardens are 
open to the public. 

A day spent at the Baltimore and 
Ohio exhibit, the Walters Art Gallery, 
the Museum of Art or in the beautiful 
cathedrals of our city rounds out any- 
one's day to the fullest extent — if we 
are "stay-at-homes." 

Of music, Peabody Conservatory of- 
fers the finest in musical culture and 
oft produces an outstanding artist who 
goes on to become world renowned in 
music. 

All this makes "Spring in Mary- 
land" a wondrous and intensely beauti- 
ful place to be — certainly one of the 
most inviting places in all these United 
States. 




A rare treat is in store for you when 
you visit Washington's newest Chinese 
Restaurant. the exciting MOON 
PALACE at 3308 WISCONSIN AVE- 
NUE, NORTHWEST, above George- 
town. Here you'll be intrigued by the 
unusual in Chinese foods. 

As you step into the intimate "Moon 
Gate Lounge", immediately to the left 
of the entrance you'll be greeted by 
your host, SAM G. WONG, owner of 
"The Palace of the Moon" and he'll 
suggest a "Golden Moon" or a "Singa- 
pore Sling" for a cocktail before enter- 
ing the dining room for dinner. 

Mr. Wong came to this country in 
1938 from Canton, China, where he 
had been engaged in the restaurant 
business. He is well known in restau- 
rant circles in Washington having 
managed The Ruby Foo Restaurant for 



v^eautiful K^lotlieA 

JEANETTE BECK, INC. 
DRESSES 

1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONES: 
MULBERRY 5-1445 
VERNON 7-9574 



30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Wi 



amen 



four years before opening '"Moon 
Palace" in April of 1957. He is a 
genial host and you'll want to return to 
his establishment often for delectable 
Chinese and American dishes. 

The decor of the handsome restau- 
rant is most attractive. The indirect 
lighting adds charm to the beautiful 
Chinese wall hangings and the Chinese 
red and chartreuse colors give a soft, 
beautiful effect to a relaxing atmos- 
phere. 

The colorful menu has a wide choice 
of foods which are delightfully different. 
Prepared by masterful Chinese chefs. 
the dishes are rare gourmet's delights. 
The restaurant also provides private 
banquet rooms and caters to the dis- 
criminating public. 




MOON 
PALACE 



Washington's Most Dignified and 

Unique Chinese & American 

Restaurant 

That Is Truly Different 

* Intimate Cocktail Lounge 

* Authentic Chinese Foods 

* Superb American Cuisine 

* Private Party Facilities 

* Fast Home Delivery Service 

* Ample Free Parking in Rear 

* Open Daily and Sunday 

3308 WISCONSIN AVE. N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EM 2-6645-46 

Member of Diner's Club 







There is a "carrj out" service and 

all one need do is call and tell the 
management when you will slop to pick 
up your steaming hot dinners or 
luncheons and they will be ready for 
you. There is plenty of parking space 
so there will be a split second timing 
on your delivery. 

Try the MOON PALACE the next 
time you dine out. 

But, "varied are the lures of travel." 

We were reminded of that recently 
when on a weekend in New York, we 
bade bon voyage to friends who are 
going to be in Europe for the next few 
months. While on a business trip to 
Germany and England, I am sure they 
will find time for a few side trips as 
outlined by Mr. J. H. Cowan of the 
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL SERV- 
ICE of the AMERICAN AUTOMO- 
BILE ASSOCIATION. 

The Travel Service offered by this 
organization is a "must" for those who 
don't want to be bothered by detail. 

Whether you are going to Bermuda, 
Berlin or Bangkok, the AAA club will 
gladly make all travel arrangements. 
Experienced travel counselors will help 
you plan a more enjoyable trip; will 
show you how to get the most out of 
your travel dollar. When you travel 
the AAA way you travel the carefree 
way. English speaking AAA representa- 
tives in 350 cities in 60 countries stand 
ready to serve you. 



MARYLAND'S OLDEST AND LARGEST FURRIERS 



• FURS 
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Stoles 

• RE-STYLING 
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OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS * LE. 9-4900 
225 N. HOWARD ST. BALTIMORE I, MD. 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Hooks 

Educational G nines 
and Toys 

Stationery and 

Greeting Cards 

Religions Book* and 
Itibles 

• /ZaltUn&ie. 'i GulUvud ^b&paittne*tt SUte' 

WE PA* POSTAGE / Moi( Qn( j p)lone r<Jcn ,(,| p p t< ) promptly. 
ON AU- BOOK; \ Writc | or f ree B 00 |( Cotoloj. 




BOOK 


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516 N. CHARLES STREET 


Phone SA 


7-7280 


Baltimore, Md. 




ALWATf A FAVORITE OIFTI 



A' 



Ear 



le Kirkley, Inc. 

3413 Greenmount Ave. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



MdUsi QnotlteAA, 

Young MODERN'S Shop 

Outstanding Sport and 

Casual Clothes 

LE 9-0550 1110-1112 

Baltimore, Md. N.CharlesSt. 



MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



31 



QoA. 



Maryland IriJoMtett 



AAA group and independent tours 
are planned tours are planned for your 
pleasure by experts with years of ex- 
perience in world travel. AAA tour 
conductors are dedicated to make your 
foreign travel time more memorable by 
relieving you of tiresome details as well 
as eliminating frustrating encounters 
with unfamiliar local conditions. They 
will also help you choose a tour to fit 
your travel budget and personal inclina- 
tion. 

They will make all necessary air, 
steamship, rail and motorcoach reserva- 
tions; arrange for the most convenient 
connections from your hometown to 
anywhere in the world; reserve space 
for you at hotels selected to meet your 
individual taste requirements both at 
home and abroad and arrange for your 
sightseeing. 

Your AAA club can arrange for you 
to hire or purchase the car of your 




KARL M. GRAF 

& Company 

2220 N. CHARLES ST. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Furniture 
Interiors 




"The Store of Highest 
Tradition and Prestige" 



choice for delivery abroad from more 
than 25 popular European makes; have 
it waiting for you as soon as you 
arrive overseas, or, if you desire, you 
can ship your own car overseas, your 
club handling all the details. 

AAA personalized service means that 
all travel arrangements made by the 
AAA club are geared to your individual 
needs and requirements. Personalized 
service also means that you can enjoy 
the same kind of courteous considera- 
tion for your welfare overseas that you 
associate with your own local AAA 
club. Choose your own itinerary . . . 
whether you travel to Europe, Asia, 
South America or circle the globe, your 
club will plan your custom made trip. 

%- & ^> 

Wherever you go you'll want to take 
along some good books for relaxation 
and reading and among the books rec- 
ommended for good reading from 
COKESBURY BOOK STORE, 516 
North Charles Street, are the following: 

Fiction 
Some Came Running — James Jones 
Moses, Prince Of Egypt — Howard Fast 
Old Man And The Sky— Robert Por- 
tune 

Maggie-Now — Betty Smith 
They Came To Cordura — Glendon 
Swarthout 

Non-Fiction 
Masters of Deceit — J. Edgar Hoover 
Madison Avenue, U.S.A. — Martin 
Mayer 

White Witch — Elizabeth Goudge 
History Of The English People Volume 
4 — Winston Churchill 
First Blood: The Story Of Fort Sumpter 
— W. A. Swanberg 



FRENCH 
PLACE VENVOME 



RESTAURANTS 
RIVE GAUCHE 



1 Years HOLIDAY award winner 

Closed Sundays 
ST 3-3779 

Chef-. Gus Diamant 

722 - 17th ST. N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Free Parking after 6 P.M. 



The Newest French Restaurant 
in Georgetown 

Closed Sundays 
FE 3-6440 

Chef-. Eugene Bastisse 
WISCONSIN & M STS., N.W. 

Free Parking for Lunch and Dinners 



32 




WW 



COMPLETE TRAVEL SERVICE 

Air & Steamship Tickets 

Cruise Reservations 

• 
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(Purchase & Shipment) 

Escorted & All Expense Tours anywhere 

World Wide Independent Tours 

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL DEPT. 

AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE ASSOC. 

1712 G ST. N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Tel: ME 8-4000 



Gifts of Distinction • Objets d'Art 

• CREATIVE DESIGNS 

• PRECIOUS STDNES 
• WATCHES 



C. J. ANDERSON 

Graduate Gemologist, G.I.A. 

— Jeweler — 

119 W. SARATOGA STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. LE 9-6342 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



^E/Ron 



designers 

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Since 1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WASHINGTON 3. D.C. 

BALTIMORE 6, MD. 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 



puny, designed to supplement ;iny 
course, presenting the various kinds of 
basic methods used in working with 
and studying microbes. I he hook, en- 
titled Manual oj Microbiological Meth- 
ods, is authored by the Committee on 
Bacteriological Technic. The Chairman 
of the Committee is M. J. Pelczar, Pro- 
lessor of Microbiology at the Univer- 
sity. 

The book is described as being the 
first book to bring together lor the stu- 
dent the basic, accepted procedures 
used for cultivating, studying, and 
identifying bacteria and other micro- 
organisms. 

MASTERSON JOINS PROMOTION STAFF 

Frank Masterson, '50, former Sales 
Promotion Manager for Remington 
Electric Shaver, was recently named 
Appliance Promotion Manager for 
McCall's Magazine. Mr. Masterson has 
been associated with the Westinghousc 
Appliance Sales Corporation in New 
York and the General Electric Supply 
Company as Sales Promotion Mana- 
ger. He was Advertising Supervisor for 
the Hecht Company. 

DR. ORBAN PROMOTED 

Dr. Edward Orban, Ph.D. '44, has been 
appointed Manager of Inorganic Pro- 
duct Development for the Development 
Department of Monsanto Chemical 
Company's Research and Engineering 
Division at St. Louis after serving as 
Project Specialist in the Development 
Department of the Company's 
Inorganic Chemicals Division since 
1955. 

SERVING UNCLE SAM 

A first solo flight was made December 
13 by Navy Ensign Robert J. Adams, 
'57. Bob entered the service at the 
Anacostia Naval Air Station, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Commissioned a Marine Second 
Lieutenant December 14 at the Marine 
Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia, was 
Robert J. Wilbert, '57. To earn his 
commission he completed a ten-week 
Officer Candidate Course at Quantico, 
along with oth;r applicants from the 
nation's colleges and former enlisted 
Marines. He is now enrolled in the 
nine month officer basic school at 
Quantico, becoming a qualified in- 
fantry platoon leader. 

DR. TADASHI OUCHI JOINS 
PARTICLE THEORY RESEARCH GROUP 

A Japanese physicist, Dr. Tadashi 
Ouchi, has arrived at the University for 
a year of research in the Department of 
Physics. 

(Continued on next page) 



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MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



Domino Restaurant 

For the Best In Food 

A HAMBURGER 

A LUNCHEON 

A DINNER OR A BANQUET 

Complete Catering Service 

Jean H. Lambert 
WEbster 5-5400 

10280 Baltimore Blvd. 
College Park, Md 

33 



HAMMOND BROS., Inc. 

FLOOR COVERING 
CONTRACTORS 



Earl H. Hammond, Pres. 
Dwight W. Hammond, Sec.-Treas. 



4315 YORK RD. BALTIMORE 1 2, MD. 

BE 5-7797 

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Dukeland brand 

• SMOKED HAMS 

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CORNED BEEF AND TONGUES 

SMOKED AND READY TO EAT 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

Baltimore, Md. 



KATHERINE ROBB Nursing Home 

REST HOME For Aged and Convalescents 
Essex Road near Liberty Road 

HUnter 6-5656 BALTIMORE, MD. 



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& Company 



REAL ESTATE 

Members of Multiple Listing Bureau 

For complete representation when 

selling, or tireless cooperation 

when buying, call 

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STflffORD HOTEL 

Visit Our New Mf. Vernon Bar 

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BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
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Dr. Ouchi is on leave from his per- 
manent position as an Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physics at Hiroshima Univer- 
sity in Hiroshima, Japan. 

He was chosen in a national compe- 
tition for a Japanese Ministry of Edu- 
cation fellowship, which will support 
him for the year he spends in research 
in the United States. 

He chose to spend this year at the 
University of Maryland, where he will 
be a member of the University's Ele- 
mentary Particle Theory group. 

Other members of this group are: 
Professor John S. Toll; Visiting Assist- 
ant Professor Joseph Sucher; Research 
Associates Thomas Day, Angelo Min- 
guzzi. and David Wong; National 
Science Foundation Fellow James M. 
Knight, and Research Assistants Luc 
Leplae, Jogesh Pati, Francisco Prats, 
Jin-chen Su, and Alfred Chi-Tai Wu. 
The group has been primarily con- 
cerned with the scattering of elementary 
particles and the foundations of quan- 
tum field theory and dispersion theory. 

This research program is supported 
by the United States Air Force Office 
of Scientific Research and the National 
Science Foundation. 

Professor Ouchi's previous research 
has been devoted to the selection rules 
derived from a new symmetry principle 
entitled "Mass Reversal" and an inves- 
tigation of the charge independence 
hypothesis. He is the author of numer- 
ous research papers published in the 
Japanese journal, The Progress of 
Theoretical Physics. 

COMPLETE BASIC COMBAT TRAINING 

Two soldiers from Baltimore were 
scheduled to complete eight weeks of 
basic training September 28 under the 
Reserve Forces Act program at Fort 
Knox, Kentucky. 

Pvt. Bertram M. Goldstein, '55, of 
5102 Sunset Road, was a member of 
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity. Pvt. Charles 
Yumkas, '56, of 6505 Western Run 
Drive, is also a member of TEP. 

Pfc. Lawrence S. Orenstein of Mer- 
rick, New York, is receiving basic com- 
bat training with the 3d Infantry Divi- 
sion at Fort Benning, Georgia. He is a 
1957 graduate. 

MATHEMATICIAN WITH TIDEWATER 
OIL COMPANY 

Dr. Werner W. Leutert is mathe- 
matician in the newly-established Elec- 
tronic Computer Department, Tide- 
water Oil Company. Dr. Leutert ob- 
tained his doctorate in mathematics 
from the Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology in Zurich. He was Assistant 



34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



FOR centuries, GLASS has been 
the preferred container for 
quality products — from bever- 
ages to cosmetics. Glass bottles for 
milk and other beverages still are 
preferred by discriminating people 
because they are assured of free- 
dom from contamination of product, 
pick-up of foreign taste or odor, 
and one can SEE both quantity 
and quality. 

Glass bottles require no lining 
material — they are rigid and stable; 
they are not absorbent and cannot 
leak or become saturated and soft. 



BUY BEVERAGES 
IN GLASS BOTTLES 



THE BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30, Md 

Originators of the Square 
Milk Bottle 



LOEWY 

DRUG CO INC. 



manufacturing and wholesale 

druggists 

distributors of 

LILLY PHARMACEUTICALS 

daily delivery within city limits 



108 S. HANOVER STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. SA 7-6203 



Professor of Mathematics .it the Uni- 
versity of Maryland from 1948 to 1951, 
and then headed computer groups at 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. 

key personnel in the Electronic 
Computer Department include Dr. 
John \v. Bishop, senior operations 
analyst; Harold J. Maddock, operations 
analyst; Justin B, Murrish, electronic 
data processing analyst; and Dr. Leu- 
ten. mathematician. 

KERW1N APPOINTED ACCOUNT 

si PI |<\ ISOK 

Walter J. Kerwin, '42, oi 10204 Tyburn 
retrace, Bethesda, has been appointed 
Account Supervisor in the Washington 
Branch Office o\ Ketchum. Mad eod & 
Grove. Inc.. national advertising and 
public relations agency. 

Mr. Kerwin will supervise the ad- 
vertising for the Air Transport Asso- 
ciation, a national organization com- 
prising all Scheduled Airlines in the 
United States. 

A native Washingtonian, Mr. Kerwin 
has been engaged in the advertising 
business locally for the past 1 1 years. 
Prior to joining Ketchum, MacLeod & 
Grove, he was Creative Director of 
the Lewis Edwin Ryan agency. 

During World War II he served as 
an officer with the 141st Infantry in 
the European Theatre. 



Department of 

AIR SCIENCE 



NAMED TO GERMANY POST 

Colonel Carleton E. Fisher, Military 
Science '56, has been named chief of 
the organization and equipment branch 
of the plans and operations division at 
the headquarters of the U. S. Army in 
Europe in Heidelberg, Germany's in- 
ternationally-known university city. 

During his European assignment, 
Colonel Fisher will serve with the U. S. 
Army, Europe, which maintains a 24- 
hour vigil along the 435-mile stretch of 
the Iron Curtain frontier in West 
Germany. 

Decorated several times, Colonel 
Fisher has been awarded the Silver Star 
medal for valor, the Purple Heart 
Medal for a combat wound, the Bronze 
Star medal and oak leaf cluster for 
meritorious service and the Army's 
coveted Combat Infantryman Badge. 

His wife and their daughter accom- 
panied him on his overseas assignment. 
(Continued on next page) 



Fine 
Funerals 

from 
3 Funeral Homes 



WM-COOK. INC 




BALTIMORE, MD. 



For 

Advertising Space 

In 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 

Contact 

SALLY L. OGDEN 

18 W. 25th St. 

Baltimore 18. Md. 

HOpkins 7-9018 



B. & B. 
EXTERMINATORS, INC. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

TERMITE SPECIALISTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140 — 9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



35 



^(UuJfte^n OXYGEN COMPANY 

LJ® COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & INHALATION THERAPY 
GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUCITATION EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 
2900 - 52nd Street — Bladensburg, Md. — UNion 4-2345 



Wood Floors 
Asphalt Tile 
Linoleum 



SOUTHEASTERN FLOOR CO. 



4935 Bethesda Avenue 
Bethesda 14, Md. 



Rubber Tile 

Cork Tile 

Acoustic Tile 



Phone OL. 2-2112 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



Bed £*Uck yd 
Jack Daniels Buick, inc. 

8526 GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING. MD. 

JUniper 9-9385 

"Silver Spring Has Everything' 



TOWER 9-6204 



JIMMIE PORTER 
Trading as 

KIERNANS 

A Complete Line of Beverages 

•200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park. Md. 



D. C. Ignition >\ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor troubles 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: NAtional 8-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V^ Washington, D. C. J 

Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



Si Susp-ply 

Hardware - Plumbing 

Purina Feeds - Sporting Goods 

8204 Baltimore Blvd. TOwer 9-6060 

College Park, Md. 

Open Sunday 10 A.M. to 2 P.M. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Egbert F. Tingley 






VOGEL AT HARVARD LAW SCHOOL 

Eugene Lewis Vogel, '53, has been 
elected a member of the Harvard Legal 
Aid Bureau at the Harvard Law School. 
The Bureau, composed of 42 mem- 
bers selected on a scholastic basis, pro- 
vides legal assistance for people who 
cannot afford to pay for counsel. Each 
member has regular office hours and is 
in full charge of cases presented by 
clients. Work is supervised by a practic- 
ing attorney, who is the attorney of re- 
cord in lawsuits, and who gives advice 
and approval in the important steps of 
the case. The Harvard Legal Aid 
Bureau was founded in 1913 and is a 
member of the National Legal Aid As- 
sociation. 

KEEN STUDIES FOREIGN TRADE 

George Benson Keen. '52, has enrolled 
as a member of the June. 1958 class of 
the American Institute for Foreign 
Trade, Phoenix, Arizona. 

Specializing in Brazil, Keen is taking 
the school's intensive training course in 
preparation for a career in American 
business or government abroad. 

While at College Park, Keen was a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, Gate 
& Key Society, University Club of Bal- 
timore, and Marketing Club. After re- 
ceiving his Bachelor of Science degree, 
Keen furthered his education at the 
University of Maryland Law School. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Gardner P. H. Foley 
Kryle W. Preis 



36 



ALUMNI BREAKFAST AT MIAMI 

One hundred and forty-eight Alumni, 
representing 40 classes and coming 
from 15 states plus Puerto Rico, Pana- 
ma, and the District of Columbia at- 
tended the seventh in the series of an- 
nual breakfasts scheduled by the Na- 
tional Alumni Association and held in 
conjunction with the American Dental 
Association meetings on November 5. 
The attendance was the second largest 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



for the breakfasts and reflected a fine 
spirit of Alumni loyalty and interest. 

President Daniel Shehan introduced 
the members and guests seated at the 
head table: Dr. Meyer F.ggnatz, Dean 
Frank J. Houghton, Loyola University, 
Dean J. Ben Robinson, West Virginia 
University, General Robert Mills, Miss 
Katharine Toomey, Dr. Lawrence W. 
Bimestcfcr, a Past President of the As- 
sociation, Dr. Lynn Emmart, member 
of the Maryland State Board of Dental 
Examiners, Dr. Edward R. White, 
Trustee of the Fourth District, Dr. 
George W. Clendenin, member of the 
Maryland Board, Dr. Daniel F. Lynch, 
Past President of the American Dental 
Association, Dr. Frank Hurst, im- 
mediate Past President of the Associa- 
tion, Dr. Edwin C. Gail, President- 
Elect of the Association, Dr. Ernest B. 
Nuttall, President of the Maryland 
State Dental Association, and Dr. 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, Secretary. Dr. 
Shehan also introduced Dr. Walter E. 
Green, '04, the oldest alumnus present. 
President Shehan called on the Secre- 
tary to make a few remarks and an- 
nouncements. Dr. Cappuccio intro- 
duced three other guests of the Asso- 
ciation: Mr. Glenn I. Millard, of St. 
Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Joseph F. Lynch, 
of New York City, and Dr. Jose F. 
Polancar, of Havana, Cuba. Others in- 
troduced were Mrs. Shehan, Mrs. Egg- 
natz, Mrs. Hurst, and Mrs. Cappuccio, 
who assisted at the breakfast. 

The principal speaker of the program 
was Mr. David L. Brigham, Director of 
Alumni Relations of the University of 
Maryland. Mr. Brigham gave an ex- 
ceptionally fine talk. He explained 
many facets of the University and the 
University Alumni Association. He 
commended our alumni on having one 
of the strongest sections of the Uni- 
versity's alumni organization. Dave con- 
gratulated the group for its past ac- 
complishments and for the impressive 
attendance at the breakfast. Dr. 
Robinson, Dean Emeritus of his alma 
mater, was greeted with a tremendous 
ovation. Dean Aisenberg also greeted 
the alumni and congratulated them for 
attending at such an early hour. 

A most enjoyable Cocktail Party was 
held by the Association at seven of the 
same day. Many classmates and old 
friends renewed acquaintances and 
joined in the spirit of this festive oc- 
casion. Dr. and Mrs. Shehan and Dr. 
and Mrs. Cappuccio received the guests 
as they arrived. It was a most enjoyable 
affair. Many of the comments indicated 
that our alumni had enjoyed the pro- 
gram arranged by the Association for 
(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 







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Sales and Service 

Air Conditioning & Heating 
Residential and Commercial 

Room Air Conditioners 

16 S. Calverton Road Baltimore 23, Md. 
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Look for the Sign 



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Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italiati Cidsine 



Open 11 a.m. to 4 o.r 
300 Albemarle St. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



— Closed Mondays 
MU 5-2811 
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PATRONIZE MARYLAND MAGAZINE ADVERTISERS 



37 




52nd ANNIVERSARY 



1906 




1958 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25. Md. CUrtis 7-1112 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS. Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE. MD. 



their entertainment. We are all looking 
forward to the 1958 meeting in Dallas, 
Texas. 



Alumni attending were: 

1904 -Walter E. Green, Baltimore. 
1907 -Robert H. Mills, Washington, 

D. C; Richard F. Simmons, Norfolk, 

Va. 
1910 -A. L. Davenport, Baltimore. 
1914 -Justin C. Doore, Waban, Mass.; 

J. Ben Robinson, Morgantown, W. 

Va. 
1916-Wilbert Jackson, Clinton, N. C. 
1917 -Coleman Brown, Tampa, Fla.; 

Frank J. Houghton, New Orleans, 

La. 
1918 -Edwin Gail, Baltimore; Carlos 

M. Maristany, Ponce, P.R. 
1921 -Louis M. Cantor, New Haven, 

Conn. 
1922 - M. S. Aisenberg, Baltimore; 

John F. Clark, Baltimore; Lynn Em- 
mart, Baltimore. 
1925 -Ernest Colvin, Washington, 

D. C; Clifford C. Higby, Clermont, 
Fla.; Lewin N. Hitchcock, West- 
minster, Md.; Daniel F. Lynch, 
Washington, D. C; Frank Mc- 
Crystla, Towson, Md.; George D. 
Resh, Hampstead, Md.; Louis 
Ulanet, Newark, N. J.; Robert E. 
Williams, Goldsboro, N. C. 

1926 -James H. Klock, Miami Beach, 
Fla.; Michael Kozubski, Baltimore; 
Harry Levin, Baltimore; Main E. 
Little, Bel Air, Md.; Kenneth A. 
Magee, Nutley, N. J.; Ward M. 
Newell, St. Augustine, Fla.; William 

E. Trail, Frederick, Md.; Phil W. 
Winchester, Morganton, N. C. 

1927 -James Holdstock, Tampa, Fla.; 
Frank Hurst, Washington, D. C. 

1928 - Benjamin A. Brown, Altantic 
City, N. J.; Melvin Colvin, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Meyer Eggnatz, Miami 
Beach, Fla.; A. Harry Ostrow, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1929 -G. B. Clendenin, Bethesda, 
Md.; Edward C. Dobbs, Baltimore; 
Morris C. Fancher, Manchester, 
Conn; Fred Harold, New Haven, 
Conn; John H. Sharpley, Baltimore. 

1931 -Ernest B. Nuttall, Baltimore. 

1932 -Irving Abramson, Baltimore; 
Charles E. Broadrup, Frederick, Md.; 
Jesse Englander, Bridgeport, Conn.; 
Arthur Fern, Hartford, Conn. 

1933 -Philip L. Block, Baltimore; Fil- 
bert L. Moore, Baltimore. 

1934 - Lawrence W. Bimestefer, Balti- 
more; Ernesto Davila-Diaz, San Juan, 
P. R.; C. Frank Sabatino, Plain- 
field, N. J.; William Schunick, Balti- 
more. 



MlTCHEil;? 



IS 



Wily 

mnRYLflno's finesT com 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
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corn in cans with- 
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pulled from the 
stalk. 



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- Packed by 

f. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



Mama Emma's 

Rfll 


Ul A 




n U m n 

Nationally Famous Italian Cuisine 




in "LITTLE 


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Since 1884 

Midstate Federal 

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5304 YORK ROAD 
Baltimore 1 2, Md. 

"Where Savings Are Safe" 



"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

eddie3?jacobs 

Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore/ Md. 



38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



11935 -H. Chandler Bernard, Kenned 
Square, Pa.; Gerson A. Freedman, 
Baltimore; Leo Minkoll, Miami, Fla.; 
Gerald Shoben, Baltimore. 
1936- Marvin Evans, Chapel Hill, 
N. C; Alvin Greenberg. Baltimore; 
Otto G. Klotz, Gloucester, N. J.; 
John H. Shackelford, Baltimore. 
1937 -Simon Markos, Dover. N. H.; 

Boleslavv W. Miksinski, Baltimore. 
1938 -Charles P. McCausland, Tow- 
son, Mci.; William H. Ryan, Cumber- 
land, Md.; Raymond \l. rheodore, 
Hollywood. Fla. 

• 1939-Barry B. Auerbach, Baltimore; 
Naomi A. Dunn. New Britain. 
Conn.; Verda Elizabeth James. 
Chicago. 111.; Kenneth V. Randolph. 
Morgantown, W. Va. 

1941 -Robert N. Baker. Kings Moun- 
tain, N. C. 

1942 -Irving G. Katz. Pikesville. Md.: 
David Marshall, Syracuse. N. Y.; 
Chester B. Ralph, Perth Ambov. 
N. J.; Riley S. Williamson, Jr., Bal- 
timore. 

1943 (March) -John C. Carvalho, Fall 
River, Mass.; John W. Menius. Jr.. 
Asheboro, N. C; Russell P. Smith, 
Jr., Cambridge, Md. 

1943 (November) -Lee Horwitz, Dun- 
dalk, Md.; Alfred J. Frost, Hudson 
Falls. N. Y.; Walter B. Stillwell, 
Savannah, Ga. 

1944 -B. Ralph Hoffman, Baltimore; 
Edward J. Hoffman, Baltimore; 
Lawrence J. Olsen, Ponce, P. R.; 
Francis W. Ostrowski, Webster, 
Mass.; Artaldo V. Quinones. San 
German, P. R.; Daniel A. Savini, 
Point Pleasant. N. J. 

1945-Arturo Benavent, Jr., Maya- 
guez, P. R.; Russell Gigliotti, Balti- 
more; John McWilliams. Deland. 
Fla. 

1946 -Charles J. Bove, Jr., Annapolis. 
Md.; Joseph P. Cappuccio, Balti- 
more; Alex Demyan, Glen Burnie, 
Md. 

1947 -Joseph S. Bell, Hartford, Conn.; 

S. W. Johnston. Fort Lauderdale, 

Fla; Edmond G. Vanden Bosche, 

Baltimore. 
1948 -Theresa A. Edwards, Beckley, 

W. Va.; Jose E. Medina, Baltimore; 

Harold R. Stanley, Jr., Bethesda, 

Md.; Albert S. Vikell. Lexington 

Park, Md. 

1950 -Francis L. Edwards, Beckley. 
W. Va.; Clyde Hannah, Salisbury, 
Md.; Robert W. Muma. College 
Park, Md.; Allie G. Phifer, Sumter, 
S. C; B. Sargent Wells. Jr.; Salisbury. 
Md. 

(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



Best for Baby . . . 



extra rich 
extra nourishing 
extra delicious 

Serving the Major Portion of MARYLAND 

BALTIMORE— Liberty 2-4300 




KOONTZ 



SALISBURY. MD. 
PI 9-7145 



EASTON. MD. 
TA 2-0380 




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225 224 

First tvith the "Carriage" Truth 



Garamond Press 




IS SOUTH FREDERICK STREET ♦ 8ALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 
YEARBOOKS • CATALOGUES • PERIODICALS • LIMITED EDITIONS 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 
SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 13, MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdmon Ave.) 



For Advertising Space 

in MARYLAND Magazine 

CALL HOpkins 7-9018 

Baltimore, Md. 

or write 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 

18 W. 25th St., Baltimore, Md. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 


WHOLESALERS 


Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


119 S. HOWARD STREET 


Baltimore 1, Md. 



39 



BARBER & ROSS CO 



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Millwork — Complete Kitchens 

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Stanley Aluminum Windows and Doors 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 

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WASHINGTON STORE 

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Phone: DEcatur 2-0501 
Hours: Monday thru Friday 
7:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. 



FALLS CHURCH STORE 

SEVEN CORNERS SHOPPING CENTER 

Phone: JEfferson 2-3710 
Hours: Mon., Thurs., Fri. 

8:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 
Tues.. Wed. & Sat. 

8:30 A.M. to 6 P.M. 



iWorrtstott & Jteabp, 3nc- 




CONTRACTORS 
and 

BUILDERS 

4206 - 53rd Avenue 
BLADENSBURG - MARYLAND 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE MD. AP 7-3201 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE— PRES. 



DMPANY Inc. 

SERVICE 



1328-30 5TH ST.. N. E. 



WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

Land Planning and Subdivision 

6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 



1 HEATING WArfield 7-8538 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
J JOBBING A SPECIALTY 


i ROBERT 


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1 6313 - 46th Ave. 


Riverdale, 


Md. 



1951 -Simon Berenson, Portland, 
Maine; William Ridinger, Miami 
Shores, Fla.; Thomas E. Wolf, Lan- 
caster, Pa. 

1952 -Morris L. Bell. Clinton, N. C; 
Alvin P. Friend, Oakland, Md.; Ro- 
bert Jozefiak, Bayonne, N. J.; Pilar 
Reguero-Caballero, Santurce, P. R.; 
Thomas Salimeno, Jr., Washington, 
D. C; Robert C. Tesher, Hollywood, 
Fla.; Adrian J. Van Oss, Catonsville, 
Md. 

1953 -Alfredo H. Berguido. Panama, 
Rep. Panama; James A. Markwood, 
Rockville, Md.; Louis F. Medeiros, 
Cambridge, Mass.; Gustavo A. 
Oduber, Oranjestad, Aruba, N. W. I.; 
Henry W. Rucker, Leesburg, Fla.; 
Harvey L. Wertz. Silver Spring, Md. 

1954 -Thomas J. Allen, Frederick, 
Md.; Robert E. Bricker. St. Albans, 
W. Va.; John B. Ellis, Tampa, Fla.; 
Donald R. Gorby, Naples, Fla.; 
Eugene A. Leatherman. Randalls- 
town, Md.; Franklin E. Stevens, 
Clark, N. J.; Kenneth H. Stoll, 
Arlington, Va.; Frank T. Stone, Jr., 
Alexandria, Va.; Raymond T. Tefft, 
Coconut Grove, Fla.; Frederic K. 
Tesher, Baltimore. 

1955 -Alfred Bees. Hampstead. Md.; 
Thomas E. Blumenbach, Coral 
Gables, Fla.; Hunter A. Brinker, Jr., 
Ft. Meyer, Va.; William R. Cotton, 
Miami, Fla.; Drexel M. Johnston, Jr., 
Baltimore; H e r v e y A. Lupien, 
Danielson, Conn.; Maurice G. 
Lussier, Manchester, N. H.; John 
Spencer, Mac Dill A. F. B., Fla.; 
James B. Stewart, Fernandina Beach, 
Fla.; Joseph F. Williams, Edenton, 
N. C. 

1956-Armand S. Hall, Cherokee, 
N. C; Jack H. Soutar, Groton, 
Conn.; Donald C. Weikert, New 
York, N. Y. 

1957 -John J. DeMartin. Baltimore; 
Robert E. DeMartin, Baltimore; Alan 
Stoler, Baltimore. 



BEST WISHES TO THE SCHOOL OF 

DENTISTRY AT WEST VIRGINIA 

UNIVERSITY 

The National Alumni Association, rep- 
resenting several thousand graduates of 
the first dental college in the world, ex- 
tends its most heartily expressed good 
wishes to the new School of Dentistry 
at West Virginia. Our alumni are na- 
turally interested in the addition of 
another member to the family of dental 
schools, but they have been especially 
interested in the establishment of the 
School at Morgantown because a fel- 
low alumnus. Dr. J. Ben Robinson, '14, 



40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Country dining with "Old 
World Charm" . . . 



TV, 



xdu 3c 



ormanau jrarm 

POTOMAC, MARYLAND 

OL 2-9421 




Authentic Pennsylvania Dutch 

Water Qate 3nn 

On the Potomac at F 

Dl 7-9256 

Open every day of the year 

Luncheon — Cocktails — Dinner 





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by //A 






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^^ Serving Discriminating 

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For 23 Years 


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N.W., WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Open Evenings & Sundays 



Washington 

STAIR & ORNAMENTAL 
IRON WORKS, INC. 

ORNAMENTAL IRON - ALUMINUM 
STAINLESS STEEL - BRONZE 

2014 Fifth St., N.E. 
Washington, D. C. 

DUpont 7-7550 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St. S. E. 
Washington, D. C. 
Virginia Phone 

and South Lincoln 3-8151 



Northwest 
and Suburban 



Phone 
LOckwood 5-3556 



OFFICES: 
THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, MARYLAND 



has been the primary figure m its or- 
ganization. I he announcement ot the 
School's opening on September 1<> pre- 
sented information that enlarged our 
recognition of the contribution that 
Maryland graduates have made ami 
will make to the progress ot formal 
dental education in West Virginia. 

Providing valuable support to the 
well-proved abilities ot Dr. Robinson, 
who retired as our Dean in 1953, are 
Dr. Kenneth V. Randolph. '39, form- 
er Professor of Operative Dentistry at 

his alma mater, as Associate Dean and 
Professor of Operative Dentistry, and 
Dr. Elias N. Costianes, '53. Instructor 
in Oral Anatorm anil Comparative 
Dental Anatomy. 

PI KSONALS 

Dr. Stanley Y. Inouye, '51, an- 
nounces the opening of his offices for the 
practice of orthodontics at Eleventh and 
L Building, Sacramento, Calif., and 
3431 Fair Oaks Boulevard. Carmichael, 
Calif. Dr. Inouye received a certificate 
in orthodontics from the University of 
Washington and also received the de- 
gree of Master of Science in Dentistry. 

Dr. Maxwell S. Golden, '41, an- 
nounces the removal of his office to 
117 Main St., South River, N. J. 

Dr. Jules Millman. '55, announces 
his return from the United States Air 
Force to the general practice of dentist- 
ry at 900 Reisterstown Road, Pikes- 
ville 8. Md. 

Dr. Robert B. Litton, '54, announces 
his association with Dr. Hubert Plaster 
in the general practice of dentistry at 
the Royster Building, Shelby, N. C. 

Dr. James F. Kast, '55, announces 
the opening of his office at 5601 Fulton 
Rd., Ext., N. W., Canton, Ohio. Dr. 
Kast completed his tour of duty in the 
Army in June. 

Dr. Harold L. Silber. '55, announces 
the opening of his office at 2668 Morris 
Ave., Union, N. J. Dr. Silber was 
recently separated from the U. S. Air 
Force. He is the son of Dr. Samuel E. 
Silber, '29. 

SCHWARTZ ON PENNSYLVANIA FACULTY 

Dr. Harold Schwartz, '42, who has 
offices in New York City and in Belle 
Harbor, N. Y., has been a member of 
the Faculty of the University of Penn- 
sylvania School of Dentistry since 1953, 
when he became an Instructor in Oral 
Reconstruction. Dr. Schwartz has pre- 
sented papers on crown and bridge 
before many local and state societies. 
During the World War he served in 
the Navy, 1943-46, chiefly sea duty 
in the Pacific. 

(Continued on next page) 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3% Interest on Savings 



Administration Hitildint; 

6495 New Hampshire Ave., Hyattsville. Md. 

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See and Drive the 1958 Ford 



SALES 



^(urcC 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

3110 Hamilton Street 

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Phone WArfield 7-0900 



LOVELESS ELECTRIC CO., Inc 
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5207 COLORADO AVENUE, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 11, D.C. 

Phone RAndolph 3-4257 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



41 



LANGLEY 

MUSIC TIME 

A Complete Record Shop 

CLASSICAL and POPULAR 

SINGLE HITS — ALBUMS 

All Speeds 

Come In and Browse 

Open Daily 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 
MUSIC TIME 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

Langley, Md. HE. 4-9728 

Efficient and Courteous Service 










m HST. 







COMBINED STUDIOS 

CULLEN PHOTO CO. 
ACADEMY PICTURES 

SO MINUTE SERVICE 

PHONE NA 8-6122, NA 8-3666 
1720 H ST. N.W., WASH. 6. D.C. 



^^MOTORISTS 



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<- 
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(Between H and I) <• 

Washington, D. C. 

if 

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If you wish to save fuel, 
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He can tune your motor, too, 
So it will run just like new. 

BUELL'S CARBURETOR & 
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42 



College of 

EDUCATION 

M. Marjorie MacMurray 



STUDENT NATIONAL EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION 

The Student National Education Asso- 
ciation (formerly FTA) has made great 
advances during the past semester. 
Membership has been doubled. Plans 
are now being made for the organiza- 
tion of a Dean's student committee to 
work with the Dean on student prob- 
lems within the College. This will be an 
honorary organization elected from stu- 
dents within the College of Education. 

SENIOR CAREER NIGHT 

Participating in Senior Career Night of 
Queen Anne's County in Centreville on 
November 20, 1957 were G. Watson 
Algire, Director of Admissions, and 
Wesley J. Matson, Assistant Professor 
in the College of Education. Richard 
Martin, one of the leaders in the Stu- 
dent National Education Association 
chapter, also spoke with prospects who 
are interested in attending the Uni- 
versity. 

PAMPHLETS PUBLISHED IN SPANISH 

Two pamphlets for parents by Dr. 
James L. Hymes, Jr., Chairman of the 
Childhood Education Department, 
originally published in this country by 
the Teachers College Bureau of Publica- 
tions, have recently been translated in- 
to Spanish under the titles, Para Ser Un 
Buen Padre and Disciplina del Nino. 
The publisher in Buenos Aires is Edi- 
torial Victor Leru, S.R.L. 

STUDY COUNCIL HOLDS MEETING 

The Washington Area School Study 
Council met in the Maryland Room on 
December 13. This Council is com- 
prised of the school superintendents and 
assistant school superintendents in the 
Washington Area, including the school 
systems of Anne Arundel, Montgomery, 
and Prince Georges Counties in Mary- 
land; Washington, D. C; and Alexan- 
dria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, 
and Falls Church in Virginia. The main 
speaker at the meeting was Dr. Fred 
Thompson of the Institute for Child 
Study, University of Maryland. His 
topic was: "Using Human Development 
in School Administration." Dr. Clarence 
A. Newell of the College of Education 
is Co-Executive Secretary of the Coun- 
cil. 



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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



: 



DR. BLOUGH AT BOOK I AIR 

Dr. Glenn Blough, Associate ProfessOl 
of Education, served as Master of Cere- 
monies at the annual luncheon meeting 
of the Book Fair sponsored by the 
Washington Post and Times Herald. 
This Fair features books for children 
and attracts thousands of visitors each 
year. Dr. Blough was also the speaker 
at the session devoted to rockets, satel- 
lites and outer space. Featured at this 
meeting was a model o\' the satellite 
which the Navy proposes to send into 
orbit. The features of the satellite were 
explained by Dr. Blough to two large 
groups of fascinated children and par- 
nts. 



PARTICIPATE IN PANEL 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of the 
College of Education, participated in a 
panel at the Maryland Congress of Par- 
ents and Teachers conference on 
November 7 and 8. The question dis- 
cussed was "Parent Participation in 
Curriculum Development." 

KAUFMAN WINS SCHOLARSHIP 

The University of Maryland Alumni 
Association has again generously made 
available a scholarship to the College of 
Education for the academic year 1957- 
58. This scholarship is awarded by the 
University Committee on Scholarships 
and Grants-in-Aid. Last year this 
scholarship was awarded to Bernard 
Kaufman and because of his record he 
has been continued as the recipient of 
the Alumni award for his sophomore 
year. 



TIERNEY NAMED CHAIRMAN 

Dr. William F. Tierney of the Industrial 
Education Department of the College 
of Education has been named Chairman 
of the Graphic Arts Laboratory Plan- 
ning and Advisory Committee. This is 
a national committee of the Internation- 
al Graphic Arts Association to assist 
secondary school and teacher education 
personnel in the planning of graphic 
arts laboratories. 

Other members of the committee are 
as follows: Otis Chidester, Tucson 
Senior High School, Tucson, Arizona; 
Howard C. Hill, Durfee Intermediate 
School, Detroit, Michigan; Frederick 
Kagy, Colorado State College, Greeley, 
Colorado; G. Wesley Ketcham, State 
Department of Education. Hartford, 
Connecticut; Dr. John A. Whitesel, 
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio; Carl 
Schramm, Catonsville High School, 
Catonsville, Maryland; and Ray 
Schwalm, Western Washington College 
of Education, Bellingham, Washington. 
(Continued on next page) 

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TIERNEY NAMES EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Dr. William F. Tierney. Associate Pro- 
fessor in Industrial Education, was re- 
cently named Executive Secretary of 
the American Council on Industrial 
Arts Teacher Education. This is an in- 
ternational association of teacher educa- 
tors in the field of industrial arts and is 
a division of the American Industrial 
Arts Association and the National Edu- 
cation Association. 

The Council publishes a yearbook 
and holds annual meetings in collabora- 
tion with the annual convention of the 
American Industrial Arts Association. 
The yearbooks are fast becoming high- 
lights in the literature of the field. 

Other officers of the Council are as 
follows: Dr. John A. Fuzak, Michigan 
State University, President; Dr. M. Ray 
Karnes, Illinois University. Vice-Presi- 
dent; and Dr. S. G. Wall, Stout State 
College, Treasurer. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

A. Bernard Eyler 



ALUMNI IN BUSINESS 

Donald E. Carruth, '57, joined Johns 
Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory 
as an Associate Engineer. Second ad- 
dition to the family Scott Edward 
Carruth. 

Donald D. Davis, '43, is currently 
Chief, Catalog Operation Section, 
Technical Information Service Exten- 
sion, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. 
He is also Editor of Nuclear Science 
A bstracts. 

William A. Dynes, '28, living in 
Dayton, Ohio where he is Chief of 
B-58 Bombing Navigation Section of 
the Weapons Guidance Laboratory 
Wright Patterson Air Force Base. 

William G. Eschmann, II, '57, work- 
ing for Allis Chalmers in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

Melvin LeRoy Glaeser, '56, has be- 
come Supervisor of the Sound Con- 
trol Laboratory for Koppers Co. Inc. 
of Baltimore, Maryland. Frederick H. 
Kohloss, '43, currently working in 
Hawaii as a Consulting Engineer. 

Robert K. Molloy, '53, Civil Engineer 
with Vanguard Construction Corp. of 
Norfolk, Va. Most recent family ad- 
dition Ellen Osborne Molloy. 

Frederick W. Nesline, Jr., '51, com- 
pleted work at Yale University and 
received his Ph.D. in 1956. He is cur- 



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44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






rently on the stafT of Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology of Cambridge. 
Massachusetts as an Assistant Professor 
of Electrical Engineering. 

Robert B. Willis. '51, has been a 
student since 1955 at the Columbia 
Theological Seminary in Decatur. 
Georgia. He was formerly employed by 
the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and 
by Bethlehem Steel Co. 

Edward Carl Wood. '56. is currently 
working for Boeing Airplane Co. 
Seattle, Washington as a Flight Test 
Engineer. 

Samuel A. Wood, Jr., Chem. E. '57, 
is doing graduate study in the field of 
Nuclear Engineering at the University 
of Michigan. 

SERVICE NEWS 

John Anthony Bates, '57. left North 
American Aviation on August 16, 1957 
to serve as a 2nd Lt. in the Air Force. 

Lt. Col. Edward L. Daniels is serv- 
ing as Executive Officer — 3605th 
Naval Training Wing, Ellington Air 
Force Base, Texas. 

Col. John T. O'Neill, '31, of the 
Corps of Engineers is in Seoul, Korea 
as Deputy Commander, Eighth Army 
Supply Command. 

Ens. Walter J. Petzold, '56, is serv- 
ing aboard the U.S.S. Manatee out of 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Ens. Clarence M. Reynolds, '56, is in 
Bremerton, Washington where he is 
Ship Superintendent. New addition to 
the family Barbara Nelson Reynolds. 

James A. Shoemaker, '55, is serving 
with the USAF as a Second Lieutenant. 

MECHANICALS ATTEND CONVENTION 

Dr. John E. Younger, Head of the 
Mechanical Engineering Department 
and Professors Charles A. Shreeve, Jr., 
Ralph H. Long, A. Bernard Eyler, and 
H. Dotson Cather attended the annual 
meeting of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers in New York. 

ASSOCIATED WITH GREINER CO. 

The following Maryland Engineering 
Alumni are associated with the J. E. 
Greiner Co., Consulting Engineers, 
Baltimore. Md. Herschel H. Allen, TO, 
Senior Partner (Doctor of Engr. 1940) 
John F. Christhilf '36; Alfred V. Con- 
ner, '54; Ulpiano Coronel, '25; Randall 
C. Cronin, '47: William O. Filbert. '46; 
Alexander A. Fleury, '5 1 ; Creston E. 
Funk, '31; Philip A. Grill, '44; William 
R. Jackson, '34; John H. Koehnlein, 
Jr., '50; John 1. Kohler, '51; Norman 
M. Lawler, Jr., '51; Benjamin W. Le- 
Sueur, '27; James G. Lutz, '49; James 
M. McCummings, '49; Robert B. Peel, 
'50; Ellis P. Root, '36; Frank W. 
Rothenhoefer, Jr., '49; John L. Siems, 



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46 



'38; George E. Taylor, Jr., '31; Donald 
W. Walter, '53; James M. Willson, '56. 
All are graduates of the Civil Engineer- 
ing Department. 

DR. BEAM HONORED 

Dr. Walter R. Beam, B.S.E.E. '47, M.S. 
'50, Ph.D. '53, has been named one 
of three recipients of awards in the an- 
nual nationwide talent search for Out- 
standing Young Electrical Engineers 
conducted by Eta Kappa Nu, national 
electrical engineering honor society. 
Dr. Beam, who is Manager Microwave 
Advanced Development, Electron Tube 
Division of the Radio Corporation of 
America, received an Honorable Men- 
tion award. 

Eligibility for the awards is restricted 
to men who have been graduated with- 
in the preceding ten years from a 
regular course in electrical engineering 
from an American college or university, 
and who are not more than 35 years of 
age. Selection is made on the basis of 
the candidate's record of achievement 
in his work; in his service to com- 
munity, state or nation; in his cultural 
or aesthetic development; and for his 
professional activities. 

Dr. Beam, at the age of 29, is an 
established authority in the field of 
microwave electron tubes. He has made 
particularly significant contributions in 
connection with the reduction of fluctu- 
ation noise in traveling wave tubes. 

BURGESS PROMOTED 

Chester W. Burgess. B.S.M.E. '49, has 
been promoted to staff engineer in the 
DPM Special Engineering Department 
of the IBM Product Development La- 
boratory at Poughkeepsie, New York. 
In his new position, Mr. Burgess is a 
member of an engineering group re- 
sponsible for estimating and designing 
special features and machine units for 
use with electronic computers. 

Mr. Burgess joined the company in 
1949 as a customer engineer in Wash- 
ington, D. C. In June, 1956 he was 
promoted to associate engineer and 
transferred to the Poughkeepsie Product 
Development Laboratory for special 
features design work. 

COLONEL TEAL RE-ASSIGNED 

Colonel Gilbert E. Teal. B.S.C.E. "37. 
has been assigned to the 1130th USAF 
Special Activities Group. Headquarters 
Command, USAF, Fort Meyer. Virgin- 
ia. His permanent duty station will be 
at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, 
where he will serve as President of the 
Air Force Physical Evaluation Board, 
one of five such boards which evaluate 
physical disability retirement cases for 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



United States Air Force military per- 
sonnel. 

Colonel Teal served in the South- 
west Pacific during World War II and 
holds numerous awards and decorations 
including the Bronze Star medal. Philip- 
pine Liberation medal, Philippine Re- 
public Presidential Unit Citation. 
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign medal. Army 
Commendation Ribbon. American De- 
fense Service medal. American Cam- 
paign medal. Armed Forces Reserve 
medal. World War II Victory medal. 
Army of Occupation in Japan medal. 
Army of Occupation in Germany 
medal, and the National Defense Serv- 
ice medal. 

Colonel Teal was the recent recipient 
of the New York University Founders 
Day Award, an honor conferred on 
students "who have distinguished them- 
selves among their fellow students 
through consistent evidence of outstand- 
ing scholarship." 

Besides the Bachelor's degree, 
Colonel Teal holds the following de- 
grees from New York University: 
Master of Arts degree in Education, 
Master of Administrative Engineering, 
Doctor of Engineering Science, and the 
Ph.D. degree in Education. 

MCFALL NAMED VICE PRESIDENT 

Russel W. McFall, E.E. '43, was named 
Vice President of Litton Industries and 
General Manager of the Maryland Divi- 
sion at College Park in December. He 
was with General Electric since 1943 
and his latest assignment as an execu- 
tive in missile and ordnance projects has 
been in nose-cone research and develop- 
ment. 

MULLEN WITH MADIGAN-HYLAND 

W. G. Mullen, M.S.C.E. '51, is resident 
engineer with Madigan-Hyland, Con- 
sulting Engineers, Long Island City, 
New York in charge of concrete for the 
Tappan-Zee Bridge. This bridge is three 
miles long and is the longest bridge 
across the Hudson River. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. June Wilbur 



RECEIVES MCCALL'S AWARD 

Mrs. Richard E. Coss, formerly Betty 

Schmidt, '53, Home Service Director, 

Hagerstown Gas Company. Hagers- 

(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



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town, was presented the 1957 American 
Gas Association Home Service Achieve- 
ment Award, sponsored hy McC all's 
Magazine. Elizaheth Sweeney Herbert, 
McCall's Household Equipment Editor, 
presented the Award, a bronze plaque 
and $200, to Mrs. Coss during the 39th 
annual convention of the American Gas 
Association in St. Louis, Missouri, on 
October 8. Mrs. Coss received the 
Award for outstanding public service 
to Hagerstown homemakers. 

CAROLYN JOSEPHSON IN VIRGINIA 

Mrs. Stanley D. Josephson. formerly 
Carolyn Buck, '46, is presently making 
her home in Norfolk, Virginia, where 
her husband is serving as a Lieutenant 
(j.g.) with the Sixth Fleet. 

While at the University she helped to 
organize a chapter of Pi Beta Phi 
sorority and served as its first president. 
She got her Master's degree at Teachers' 
College at Columbia University and 
subsequently taught at the University of 
Bridgeport. 

Lieutenant Josephson is a member of 
the New York Bar. 



School of 

LAW 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



WISE AND REDDEN IN POLITICS 

James A. Wise. State's Attorney for 
Caroline County, recently announced 
his candidacy for the House of Dele- 
gates in the forthcoming Democratic 
Primary. Mr. Wise, a graduate of the 
University's School of Law, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1934. 

Also in Caroline County politics is 
another Maryland University graduate, 
Harry Roe Hughes, who recently an- 
nounced that he is a candidate for the 
office of State Senator from that coun- 
ty. He will be competing, in the Demo- 
cratic Primary, against Layman Redden, 
whose son Roger, a 1957 graduate of 
the University's School of Law, was 
recently admitted to the Bar of Caro- 
line County. 

APPOINTED ASSISTANT JUDGE ADVOCATE 

Lieutenant Colonel Samuel H. Wright- 
son, '34, recently was appointed Assist- 
ant Judge Advocate of the Seventh 
Army Staff Judge Advocate in Ger- 
many. Colonel Wrightson entered the 
Army in 1931 and arrived in Germain 
on this tour of duty in September, 1955. 
The colonel was graduated from The 
Johns Hopkins University in 1931. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



AUXILIARY BENEFIT APRIL 29 

The Women's Auxiliary Board of the 
University Hospital will stage a gala 
luncheon and fashion show at the 
Emerson Hotel in Baltimore on Tues- 
day, April 29th at 12:30 p. m. under 
the direction of Mrs. Thurston A. 
Adams. General Chairman. 

This Hospital group sponsors one 
outstanding event annually for the 
benefit of the University Hospital. 

The Fashion Show this year will be 
under the direction of the Schleisner 
Company of Baltimore. 

An invitation is extended to all 
alumni of the University and their 
friends to attend this worthwhile cause 
and enjoy a pleasant afternoon. 

Mrs. C. F. Krause, 106 Dunbarton 
Road, Baltimore, is ticket chairman. 
Please contact her for reservations. 

Other chairmen and co-chairmen for 
the luncheon and fashion show are 
Mrs. J. Huff Morrison, Mrs. J. E. 
Weyer, Mrs. William S. Stone, Mrs. 
James G. Arnold, Jr., Mrs. Edward F. 
Cotter, Mrs. Marshall Wentz, Mrs. 
Richard L. Grigg, Mrs. Nelson Carey, 
Mrs. William Seabold, Mrs. N. G. 
Pierpont, Mrs. Reginald Burroughs, 
Mrs. Richard Coblentz. Mrs. Kennedy 
Waller. 

The ladies urge you to support their 
program. Please call for reservations. 

NAMED CHIEF OF STAFF 

Dr. Phillip A. Insley, Salisbury physi- 
cian and surgeon, was recently elected 
as Chief of Staff of Peninsula General 
Hospital. He has been a member of the 
hospital staff since he established prac- 
tice in Salisbury in 1936. 

DR. THOMPSON ELECTED 

Dr. Raymond K. Thompson was re- 
cently elected President of the Con- 
gress of Neurological Surgeons. A na- 
tive of South Dakota, Dr. Thompson 
was educated at the University and re- 
ceived his specialty training at Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

DR. DOERNER OPENS OFFICE 

Dr. Wyand Francis Doerner. Jr., '53, 
recently opened a suite of offices for the 
practice of medicine at the Algonquin 
Hotel, Cumberland. Maryland. 

While in school. Dr. Doerner was a 
member of Nu Sigma Nu fraternity. 
Following a year's internship at Univer- 
sity Hospital he spent three years in 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



residency training at St. Agnes Hos- 
pital, Baltimore, and at Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospitals in Baltimore and 
Coral Gables, Florida. 

CITED FOR DISTINGUISHED WORK 

Dr. Mason Trupp, '37, well-known 
brain surgeon of Tampa, Florida, has 
been awarded a citation fur his dis- 
tinguished work in medicine by the 
Washington College Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

He graduated from Washington Col- 
lege in Chestertown with the B. S. de- 
gree in 1933. 

In addition to having his own prac- 
tice in Tampa, Dr. Trupp heads the 
neurosurgery departments at Tampa 
General Hospital and at St. Joseph's 
Hospital in Tampa. 

The Citation reads as follows: 

"Dr. Trupp has established a far- 
reaching reputation as a top ranking 
specialist in neurosurgery, a singular at- 
tainment for so young a man. His bril- 
liant career has been marked by his 
continued application of a scholarly 
attitude to the practice of medicine. 

"He gained prominence during 
World War II, when his skill was uti- 
lized by the Medical Corps of the U. S. 
Army Air Force. Many were the in- 
jured soldiers whose lives he saved. 

"It was Baltimore's great loss when 
Dr. Trupp left his native city to settle 
in Tampa. Florida, where he is a valued 
professional member of his community. 

"His proficiency in brain surgery has 
brought new hope to suffering fellow 
men and their families. His progress and 
professional standing reflect credit upon 
his previous academic career. We are 
proud to call him our own." 

TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION FELLOW- 
SHIP AWARDED TO DR. SPICER 

Dr. William S. Spicer, Medical School 
Chief of Pulmonary Diseases, is one of 
26 physicians named to receive Na- 
tional Tuberculosis Association fellow- 
ships for the current year. 

In making the announcement, Asso- 
ciation Director of Medical Education 
Julius L. Wilson said that the fellow- 
ships are a part of the medical educa- 
tion and research programs of NTA 
which are supported primarily by 
Christmas Seal funds. 

The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine fellowship was made up 
of one grant of $4,000 by the American 
Trudeau Society, which is the medical 
section of the NTA. Additionally, Dr. 
Spicer has been awarded a $2,000 fel- 
lowship by the Maryland Chapter of 
NTA. 

Operating under the administration 
(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



DIETRICH BROTHERS salutrs the 
outstanding progress made l>\ 
The University of Maryland 



The man] buildings on il" ' oil.-. Park • impui 
i ontaining steel fabi i< ated and ere< ted bj 
I (ietrich Brol hei -. Inc. art • ndiu ing lymbo 
thai progress. 



WHEN THE JOB 
CALLS FOR 

STEEL 

. . . CALL . . . 



brqJBers 



Baltimore 18, Md 
Phone: HO. 7-9700 

Washington, D. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. 
1408 Insurance Bldg. 
Phone: 5623 



STEEL FABRICATING 



STEEL WAREHOUSING 







ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



pfaltiHiott i ttJieneei Citveleae jUanuTaclutex 

Established 1912 

Factory and Office: 2510 LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D.C. ADams 4-3979 



Since 1935 



ROADS BY 
DRUMMOND AND COMPANY INC. 



Phone: HUnter 6-7900 



Pikesville - 8, Md. 



VELLEGGIA'S 

Italian Restaurant 

Home Style Italian Cuisine 

204-206 S. HIGH ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. 

FINE WINES — LIQUORS — BEERS 

— Air Conditioned — 
For Reservations and Private Parties Phone — Pt 2-9075 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 



The "Handy" Line 



Baltimore, Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



49 




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of the Department of Internal Medi- 
cine, the Section of Pulmonary Dis- 
eases will direct its activities into the 
fields of teaching, service and research. 
The diagnostic facilities in chest dis- 
eases will be expanded for the ambula- 
tory and hospitalized patient. 

In the out-patient department of 
University Hospital, diagnostic pulmo- 
nary function studies are being set up. 
After a model diagnostic tuberculosis 
laboratory is developed the personnel 
of the clinic and patient load will be 
increased. 

Dr. Spicer said that the anti-tubercu- 
lous drugs can be rapidly tailored to the 
individual patient if adequate bacterio- 
logical and blood studies can be done. 
The laboratory will offer the newest 
methods and will be used both for diag- 
nosis and for the training of personnel 
from other laboratories. Dr. Spicer's 
end goal is more adequate and individ- 
ualized therapy. 

The main research endeavor of the 
section of pulmonary diseases is di- 
rected toward the reactions of human 
beings to the tubercle bacillus. To this 
end the studies are being conducted in 
cooperation with the Loch Raven VA 
Hospital in-patients with chronic, diffi- 
cult to manage, tuberculosis in an effort 
to better understand the metabolism of 
the tubercle bacillus in the human body. 

Dr. Spicer also plans further studies 
with the use of newer vaccines in both 
the treatment and prevention of the 
disease. Initially, these studies will be 
conducted in lower animals. 

BLAKE ON EINSTEIN FACULTY 

Dr. Fred S. Blake, '43, (November), 
was appointed instructor in Oral Sur- 
gery at Albert Einstein College of Medi- 
cine in 1955. Dr. Blake entered the 
Army Dental Corps immediately after 
graduation and served till June, 1946 
when he was separated as a Captain. 
He then began practice in Paterson, 
N. J. Following postgraduate study at 
Columbia in Exodontia and Oral Sur- 
gery he interned in Oral Surgery at 
Bellevue Hospital. Since 1948 he has 
specialized in Oral Surgery. In 1956 
he opened a second office in Passaic, 
N. J. Dr. Blake has contributed several 
articles to the Journal of Oral Surgery 
and to Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, 
Oral Pathology. He has presented clinics 
at Greater New York, ADA, and New 
Jersey State Dental Association meet- 
ings. Dr. Blake is affiliated with four 
hospitals: Adjunct Oral Surgeon, Barn- 
ert Memorial Hospital, Paterson; As- 
sistant Visiting Dental Surgeon, Bronx 
Municipal Hospital Center; Consultant 
Oral Surgeon, Chilton Memorial Hos- 



C^veru ^Jabie \-SverlooKA 



Pict 



ureiaue 



K^ountruside 



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OLNEY„/MD. \^ 

"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 

(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR BRIDGE PARTIES, 
WEDDINGS, BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Space — 

PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gertrude Allison Brewster, Owner 




WASHINGTON'S 
ONLY 

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LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up to 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Bladcnsburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 
(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



KIDUIELL & KIDUIEU, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 
Installation 



BOX 266 

WEbster 5-4S00 



COLLEGE PARK 
MD. 




S. A. GATTI & SONS, 
Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 
3125 V STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

LA 6-8234 



50 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Ipital, Pompton Plains; Consultant Oral 
Surgeon, Riverside Hospital, Boonton. 
He is a member of Sigma Epsilon 
Delta. 

RESEARCHER IN ANESTHESIOLOGY 

Dr. Herbert A. Krasner, '43, (Novem- 
ber), entered the Army shortly after 
graduation and served till his separa- 
tion in 1946 with the rank of Captain. 
For the next five years he engaged in 
general practice in Verona, N. J. Since 
1951 he has specialized in Oral Sur- 
gery in Bloomfield, N. J. Dr. Krasner 
has contributed several papers on 
anesthesia to the Journal of Oral Sur- 
gery and the Journal of the New Jersey 
State Dental Society. He has also pre- 
sented clinics on "Intravenous Anes- 
thesia" before the ADA meetings of 
1955 and 1956 and the AM A meeting 
of 1957. Dr. Krasner is now engaged 
in an investigation of the oral and 
intramuscular use of combined corti- 
sone and antihistamines for decreasing 
and/or eliminating postoperative edema 
and trismus and for eliminating in- 
flammation following endotracheal in- 
tubation. Dr. Krasner is a member of 
Alpha Omega. 

HEADS DEPARTMENT AT NEW HOSPITAL 

Dr. J. Ogle Warfield, Jr., '22, is Chair- 
man of the Department of Surgery at 
the new Washington Hospital Center, 
located south of the Soldiers' Home in 
Washington, D. C. Dr. Warfield did his 
residency at Women's and University 
Hospitals, Baltimore. He was Senior At- 
tending at Children's Hospital. He has 
had four years special training and was 
for seven years associated with Dr. H. 
H. Kerr. His hobbies are gardening, 
growing apples and home movies. 



School of 

NURSING 



Mrs. Selma Kleckner 



WHAT THE ALUMNI ARE DOING 

Margaret Davidson Beall, '39, (Mrs. 
J. F. B. Johnston) will leave Japan on 
January 12th to live in Philadelphia, 
where her husband, Cdr. Johnston, will 
be commanding the Damage Control 
Center there. Their new address will be 
c/o Damage Control Tr. Center, U. S. 
Naval Base, Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Dora Brosenne Oliver, '05, has 
moved from Washington, D. C, to 
17018 S. Western Ave., Gardena, Cali- 
fornia. 

(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

EDWARDO ROY, his violin, and 

his orchestra for dancing, 10 

till closing. 

COLONIAL WAGONS DINNER 

$3.85, 6 to 10, Monday thru 

Saturday. 

Blue Room 

Brings you its Parade of fam- 
ous name Bands for dancing 
from 8:15 to 12:45. Tuesday 
thru Saturday. 

Dining from 7. 



THE 




CONNECTICUT AT CALVERT 

RESERVATIONS: ADams 4-0700 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 




r 



Johnston Lemon & Co 



MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

15710 Colesville Road 
SILVER SPRING. MARYLAND 



<z~>£rt. r ina itudenti ana 
aJ.um.nl of the 
( LLnive.xi.itu of 



_: \ UiiLjland 



-;•) ii£iiii 



LUSTIHE niCHOLSOn 

QldunohiU 

<P&d J-'uitlne . . . 
neaa of Both aom.han.LeA 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 

51 



THE GEORGE 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

A Maryland Corporation Since 1922 

ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



J 




Tennis Courts 

Hand and Volley 

Ball Courts 

Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc. 

PAYING CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91 -O Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D. C. 



FRANK B. JONES 

OPTICIAN 

Over 30 Years Experience 

Dispensing and Manufacturing 

Modern Eye Wear 

Complete Optical Laboratory 
on Premises 

JUniper 9-8780 

^8482 FENTON ST. SILVER SPRING, MD.J 



'Pace Heated is 
Well Heated" 



W. K. PACE 



HEATING— PIPING— AIR CONDITIONING 



1240 Ninth St.. N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. 

ADams 4-4665 



Mary Margaret Brown, '53, (Mrs. 
Robert E. Needham) is living in Cali- 
fornia with her family after having 
spent from June, 1954 to August, 1956 
in Anchorage, Alaska, where she was 
working in the Providence Hospital and 
later the Greater Anchorage Health 
District. Son Patrick Earl is now two 
years, four months, and Christopher 
Eric, eight months. Peggy's husband is 
now out of the service. 

Lucy Brude, '24. (Mrs. William T. 
Abercrombie, Jr.) with her husband, 
has moved from New Jersey to Bir- 
mingham, Alabama. 

Mrs. Lois Fraley Schildwachter, '48, 
who visited the University Hospital on 
November 7th, is residing in New York 
City with her husband and two chil- 
dren. 

Mrs. Nancy Franklin Hartsock, '47, 
is now residing in Hawaii where her 
husband, Major W. D. Hartsock is sta- 
tioned, as Oral Surgeon at dental clinic. 

Nancy Gocke, '55, (Mrs. Stephen 
Barchet) and young daughter Sheila 
Ann, are living in Portsmouth, Virginia, 
where Dr. Barchet is serving in the U.S. 
Naval Hospital. 

Mrs. Sandra Lee Jones Davis, '47, is 
now an instructor in Clinical Obstetrics 
at Englewood Hospital. New Jersey. 
Her husband, who received his Ph.D. 
in Physiology at Syracuse University, is 
now attending Medical School at the 
New York Medical College. 

Myrtle June Kite, '44, (Mrs. Robert 
William Ageton) is with the Arlington 
County (Virginia) Health Department 
in the capacity of supervisor. Her new 
husband is a mining engineer in the 
U.S. Bureau of Mines at the College 
Park, Maryland, station. Her address is 
2504 N. Kenilworth St.. Arlington, 
Virginia. 

Louise Dukes Magruder, '42, (Mrs. 
Thomas A. Clary) returned from 
Hawaii when her husband was dis- 
charged from the Army. They now 
reside at 120 N. Hoopes Avenue, 
Auburn, New York, where Dr. Clary is 
practicing dentistry. Their daughter, 
Mary Louise, was born at the Tripler 
Army Hospital in Hawaii where Louise 
saw Louise Gordner, '43, who is sta- 
tioned there. Son Thomas Austin, Jr., 
arrived Oct. 30, in Auburn. 

Carolyn Myers, '53, (Mrs. Henry A. 
Baer) is now living at 996 Pelelin 
Drive, Tarawa Terrace, North Carolina, 
where her husband is stationed with 
the Marines at Camp Lejeune, after 
completing his internship at the Univer- 
sity of Virgina. Eleven month old son, 
Randy, is going to be a typical "Navy 
Junior." 

Mary Lou Nicol, '44, (Mrs. Robert 



52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



THE 



LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Ljo u r ^jrrie n cltii ^rtoi ti 



Just eisht milos from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll ti ii « 1 complete comfort and con- 
veniences, 

Phone WArfield 7-8324 

For Reservations 
/•'ice TV Fret Parking 

On l. s. Highway No. I 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, Ml). 



HUFFER SHINN 

Optical 
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Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET, N.W. 

NAtional 8-1457 Washington, D. C. 



* REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. * 

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1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING. REFRIGERATION. 
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Serving 

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VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

. WASHINGTON 9, D. C. # 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

Kitc&etesUa 

SELF-SERVICE 

Delicious food... All our desserts are 
home-made . . . popular prices . . . 
no tipping. . .air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Ouality Coffee 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 
11th Street Entrance of 
HOTEL HARRINGTON 
11th & E Sts., N.W. Washington, D.C. 




2637 Conn. Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C. 
MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



K. Brown) with her laniih ol husband 
and si\ girls, has returned to nature on 

164 acres of Mojavc Desert, -- 1 miles 

1 1 om Barstow. Fort) acres have been 
cleared foi oats, alfalfa, garden and 
lawn. Their 9 horses provide pleasures, 

\ci chores, then cow then own BUppl) 

ol milk and butter; in the absence ol 
electricity, Butane gas provides refrigei 
ation and heal and kerosene lamps foi 
light, I he Browns are confident thai 

their return to nature has given hack 

ten years to husband Boh who has been 
in ill health. Their aim within the nexl 
two years is to have a camp for boys ol 
10 to 16. 1 heir address is Box 115. 
Hinkley, Calif. 

Stephanie Rakoc/v. '48, (Mrs. 
Charles Lee Cover. Jr.) has moved 
from Baltimore to 160 Ethel St.. Mcnlo 
Park Terrace, Metuchen, New Jersey. 

Patricia Schindel. '47. ( Mrs. Thomas 
O. Renn) is living in Babbitt. Nevada 
(Box 33), where her husband was trans- 
ferred from Florida. He is Industrial 
Relations Officer (Civilian) of the Navy 
Ammunitions Depot at Hawthorne, 
Nevada. They have a lovely apartment 
on the base which is actually an oasis 
in the desert — which boasts a six-hole 
golf course. Son Tom was six and 
Joanne four, on September 30th. 

Katherine Swint, '54, (Mrs. Herbert 
K. Speers) in August moved to their 
new home at 1 Highland Park Drive in 
Levittown, Pennsylvania, where her 
husband has opened his office in the 
practice of obstetrics and gynecology. 
Daughter Karen Diane arrived Decem- 
ber 16, 1956. 

Mrs. Kenneth Trostle Walcott, '48, is 
planning to move to Columbus, Ohio, 
where her husband will be a Psycho- 
logist for the State Penitentiary. 

Mrs. Walcott has been nursing in 
obstetrics and anaesthesia in Tiffin, 
Ohio. 

Alexandra Carol Tanona, '48, has a 
position in the Memorial Hospital for 
cancer and allied diseases, and lives at 
the Barbizon Hotel for Women at 
Lexington and 63rd Streets in New 
York. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION NEWS 

400 ATTEND VALENTINE DANCE 

The Annual Entertainment and Valen- 
tine Dance of the Alumni Association 
(Continued on next page) 



COMMERCIAL 

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APPRAISALS 
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HARRY A. B0SWELL CO., 

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MT. RAINIER, MD 
AP. 7-1111 



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machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE • AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



SUBSCRIBE TO 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



53 



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FEderal 3-7272 

54 



of the School of Pharmacy, was held 
in the ballroom of the Emerson Hotel, 
Baltimore, February 13. 

The committees in charge of the af- 
fair were fortunate in having a clear 
but cool evening, in advance of the 
great snow storm on Saturday. More 
than 400 persons, including students 
and their ladies and escorts, faculty 
members, invited guests, and some 200 
members of the Alumni Association 
enjoyed the evening. 

President H. Nelson Warfield wel- 
comed the group in attendance. Samuel 
Portney, First Vice President, was Gen- 
eral Chairman of the committees and 
presented the following entertainers: 
"Chiquito and Pedro" who have previ- 
ously performed on the Ed Sullivan 
Show; Leverne and John Starr, a dance 
team known as "The Ducats"; and 
four students, "The Unknowns", recip- 
ients of second prize at the annual 
Frolic in November, who presented 
vocal numbers accompanied by the 
guitar. Music for dancing was furnished 
by a group known as "Men of Note." 

A Souvenir Program represented ad- 
vertisements from manufacturers, 
wholesalers, retailers, associated organi- 
zations, members of the alumni and 
friends. This program required many 
hours of work by the members of the 
Program Committee and places several 
thousand dollars in the treasury for 
carrying on the work of the Associa- 
tion, which will be used mainly for 
student aid and scholarships. Scholar- 
ships are provided by the Association 
for two first-year students, including 
tuition, books, etc. for the year. The 
Alumni Association has also donated 
$400.00 annually for many years for 
student aid to members of the upper 
classes of the School of Pharmacy, 
which is matched by a corresponding 
amount from the American Founda- 
tion for Pharmaceutical Education. 
George J. Stiffman and Solomon Weiner 
were the able Chairman and Co-Chair- 
man of the Souvenir Program Com- 
mittee. Samuel I. Raichlen is Chair- 
man of the Scholarship Committee. 

James P. Cragg, Jr. was Chairman 
of the Entertainment Committee; 
Samuel A. Goldstein was Chairman of 
Place and Arrangements Committee; 
Jerome A. Stiffman and Charles Spigel- 
mire were Chairman and Co-Chairman 
of the Publicity Committee; Solomon 
Weiner and Irving I. Cohen were 
Chairman and Co-Chairman of the 
Ticket Committee and had the coopera- 
tion of students and alumni in secur- 
ing a large and appreciative attendance. 
Delicious ice cream from Meadowgold 
was served following the presentation 



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BRENTWOOD, MD. 

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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



of the program. Prizes donated by 
wholesalers and friends were drawn by 
the holders of the lucky tickets. 

The Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy is also extremely 
interested in the work of the Student 
Recruitment Committee, which was 
organized in 1957, and which works 
in conjunction with the Dean and 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 
To date the Committee has presented 
"Pharmacy as a Career" to 32 Mary- 
land High Schools. Committee mem- 
bers are H. Nelson Warfield, Chair- 
man; Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr., Alex- 
ander J. Ogrinz, Jr., Gordon A. Mouat. 
Noel E. Foss, Frank J. Slama and 
Samuel I. Raichlen. 

President Warfield and General 
Chairman Samuel Portney are proud 
of the accomplishments of the chair- 
men and many working members of 
the different committees. 

The highlight affair of the year will 
be the June banquet honoring the 1958 
Graduating Class and a number of 
Class Reunions, on June 5th, at the 
Emerson Hotel. 

The annual business meeting of the 
Association is tentatively scheduled for 
May 15. 



College of 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
RECREATION and 
HEALTH 

Dr. Theron A. Tompkins 



SERVICE RENDERED THROUGHOUT 
THE STATE 

Various members of the faculty of the 
College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion, and Health have taught off-campus 
courses every semester since the College 
was organized in July of 1949. 

Courses were offered both on the un- 
dergraduate and graduate levels in 
Health Education, Physical Education, 
and Recreation in all sections of the 
State. Not until the first semester of 
1954-55 were accurate records kept of 
the off-campus courses, showing who 
taught them, where they were taught, 
how many persons were enrolled, and 
how many miles the teachers travelled 
in meeting these classes. 

The charts below show an accurate 
account of the service rendered by the 
faculty of this College to the school 

MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



personnel, health education personnel, 

and the recreation personnel ol the 
State who were enrolled in these 
courses. 



Hea. 189 
Hea. 189 



Johnson 

Johnson 



First Semester 1 
Course No. Teacher 
PI 120 Humphrey 
PE 120 Humphrey 
PE 120 Haverstick 



PE 190 

PE 250 

PE 203 
Hea. 160 
Hea. 160 

Hea. 160 
Hea. 190 



Haverstick 

Johnson 
Mohr 
Massey 
Terry 

Johnson 
Hubbel 



Second Semester 
PE 120 Humphrey 



PE 120 
PE 160 
PE 195 
PE 280 
PE 291 
Hea. 160 



Haverstick 

Wessel 

Humphrey 

Massey 

Deach 

Terry 



Hea. 160 Massey 

Hea. 170 Johnson 

Hea. 170 Johnson 

Rec. 170 Harvey 

First Semester 1 
Course No. Teacher 



PE 120 
PE 120 
PE 120 
PE 130 
PE 210 
PE 220 
PE 290 
Hea. 170 



Humphrey 

Humphrey 

Haverstick 

Haverstick 

Mohr 

Massey 

Johnson 

Johnson 



Second Semester 
PE 120 Humphrey 



PE 120 
PE 120 
PE 201 
PE 160 
PE 250 
Hea. 160 
Hea. 170 
Hea. 145 



Humphrey 

Haverstick 

Deach 

Wessel 

Johnson 

Massey 

Johnson 

Tompkins 



First Semester 1 
Course No. Teacher 
PE 120 Humphrey 



Hea. 170 
PE 120 
PE 120 
Hea. 160 
Hea. 160 



Humphrey 

Haverstick 

Haverstick 

Massey 

Terry 



^54-ss 
Where Taught 

Annapolis 

( irantsville 
Prince 

Frederick 
Ellicott 

Citj 
Baltimore 
Baltimore 
( Cumberland 
Ellicott 

City 
Baltimore 
Suitland 

1954-55 

Frederick 

Chestertown 

Baltimore 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Prince 

Frederick 
Bel Air 
Grantsville 
Grantsville 
Suitland 

955-56 

Where Taught 

Suitland 

Glen Burnie 

LaPlata 

Denton 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Glen Burnie 

1955-56 

Rockville 

Wildercroft 

Rockville 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Oakland 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 

956-57 

Where Taught 

Marley 

Marley 

Snow Hill 

Leonardtown 

Baltimore 

Cambridge 



Second Semester 
i'i 120 Humphrey 



I'l 195 
PE 150 

PE 160 

PE 160 
PI 291 
Hea, 120 

Hea. 120 

Rec. 1X0 



I lumphre) 
I ylei 
Masse) 

Masses 
Deach 
Johnson 
Johnson 

Harvej 



Bladensburg 
Bladensl 

IVSf,-57 

Parole 

Marie) 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 
Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Denton 



I ii si Semester i ( ;57-5x 
Course No. Teacher Where Taught 
PE 120 Humphre) Baltimore 

PE 120 Haverstick low son 

PE 201 Eyler Baltimore 

Hea. 120 Hubbel Annapolis 

Hea. 160 Massey Salisbur) 

Hea. 170 Humphre) Parole 

Hea. 178 Johnson Bladensburg 

Since the first semester of 1954-55, 
including the present semester, twelve 
different faculty members have travelled 
82,709 miles to teach 1,348 persons. 

SEVIER WITH AIR FORCE 

Vernon A. Sevier, '55, is at present on 
active duty with the Air Force as a 
First Lieutenant. He is a B-47 pilot at 
Dyess Air Force Base, a Strategic Air 
Command installation at Abilene, 
Texas. 

IN THE ARMY 

Army Private James Kappler. 23-year- 
old All American lacrosse player at the 
University in 1955-56-57, recently com- 
pleted eight weeks of medical training 
at Fort Sam Houston. Texas. Kappler 
entered the Army in August 1957 and 
received basic combat training at Fort 
Chafee. Arkansas. 



College of 

SPECIAL AND 

CONTINUATION 

STUDIES 



ENROLLMENTS OVERSEAS 

Despite the cut in funds and personnel, 
the University's Overseas Program con- 
tinues to flourish. Enrollments in the 
European Division were slightly less 
than last year's; nevertheless, a new 
center in Madrid, Spain was opened 
with plans for opening other centers in 
Spain in the making. 

(Continued on next page) 

55 



A BALTIMORE INSTITUTION 
SINCE 1874 

• 

WM. J. TICKNER 

& SONS 

INCORPORATED 

• 

North and Pennsylvania Aves. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Phone LA 3-4321 

• 

Distinctive Funeral Service 



AMERICAN 

Office Equipment Co., Inc. 

COMPLETE LINE OF 

DESKS. CHAIRS. 

FILING CABINETS 

SAFES 

ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS 
and OFFICE PARTITIONS 

Bought, Sold & Exchanged 

Leather 
Upholstered Furniture 

NEW and USED 

309 N. CALVERT STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

LExington 9-7529 

Member Baltimore Office Furniture Assoc. 



PARK YOUR 
PRINTING 

PROBLEMS 
HERE... 



MAURICE LEESER Co. 

Victor P. Skruck, Pres. 

Fine Printing for 2 Generations 

Pratt and Greene Sts. • SAratoga 7-4446 



In the Far East, where last year saw 
1,800 course enrollments in Term I, 
an additional 1,800 course enrollments 
were added in this year's Term I. 

The Atlantic Division had 457 en- 
rollments as against 369 for Term I of 
last year, a 50 per cent increase. 

The grand total of 12,257 enrollments 
for Term I reflects an overall increase 
over Term I, 1956. 

PUBLISHES STORY 

A newly-assigned full-time Lecturer in 
the European Division of the Overseas 
Program, Dr. Joseph L. Leach, 
published a short story, "The Yale 
Bowl-Over," in the November issue of 
Seventeen. An instructor in English, 
American Literature and Civilization, 
Dr. Leach is very familiar with the 
Yale scene, having studied there from 
1942 to 1948 while working on. his 
doctorate. 

The theme of the story is the ex- 
posure of a Yale undergraduate, who 
pretends to be a "big man on the 
campus," by his girl friend during a 
Harvard-Yale weekend. 

Dr. Leach is the author of The 
Typical Texan (Southern Methodist 
University Press, 1952) and a frequent 
contributor to the Journal of American 
Folklore. 

HOFER APPOINTED 

Ernest H. Hofer, in the Overseas Pro- 
gram of the University only three years, 
has been appointed Associate Director 
of the European Division. He serves 
under Brig. Gen. Herman Beukema 
(U. S. Army, retired), Director. Until 
his recent elevation, Mr. Hofer was As- 
sistant Director in charge of Publicity 
and Public Relations. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Notice of Alumni marriages, en- 
gagements and births should be 
directed to the attention of the 
Editor, Maryland Magazine, Ad- 
ministration Annex Building, 
University of Maryland, College 
Park. 



ENGAGEMENTS 

Miss Alita Sites, Ed. '54, to Mr. Glen 
Dale Lichtenwalter. 




DAVIDSON 

will move you safely, 

easily, promptly! 

Call us for local, nation-wide 
and world-wide Services . . . 
Pre-Planned by experts, and 
in clean, Sanitized vans. 

Baltimore BR 6-7900 
Washington TA 9-5200 

— Dependable Since 1896 — 



DRVIDSCm 



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PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






Miss Lois Jean O'Donnell to Mr. 
Hugh A. McMullen, Law. 
Britta Helene Fris, Nursing '52, to Lt. 
(j.g.) Richard Phillips. USNR. Uni- 
versity of Florida graduate. 
Mary [Catherine Hessenauer, H. Ec. 
'55, to Mr. Donald Eugene Andrews. 
Ruth Glassford to Lewis E. Dove, Ag. 
•57. 



MARRlACil S 

Miss Diane Harper Stottler and Mr. 
Charles Read Madary. Jr.. were married 
on Saturday. February 1 at a 7 p. m. 
candlelight service in the University 
Chapel. 

The bride was given in marriage by 
her father, Mr. Richard H. Stottler. 
who is Assistant Dean of the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies 
and Director of Institutes at the Uni- 
versity. 

The maid of honor was Miss Grace 
Tunnicliffe of Arlington. Virginia. The 
bridesmaids were Miss Patricia Nash 
of Washington, D. C, Miss Barbara 
Neale of Baltimore, Maryland, Miss 
Joyce Harrington of Adelphi, Maryland, 
and Miss Mary Ann Gatz of Wolcott, 
New York. 

The bridegrooms' best man was Mr. 
Joseph Janssens. Jr., of Union, New 
Jersey and the ushers were Mr. Richard 
H. Stottler, Jr., brother of the bride, 
Mr. Andrew McDonald, Mr. James 
Travis, Jr., and Mr. Harry J. Lange- 
luttig, Jr., all of Baltimore, Maryland. 
The flower girl was the step sister of 
the bride, Cathalene Bassett. The ring 
bearer was a nephew of the bride, Wil- 
liam Powers of Wilmington, Delaware. 

After a brief honeymoon in Virginia 
the young couple will reside at the 
University Hills apartments near the 
University where both are senior stu- 
dents. The bride is a member of Delta 
Delta Delta sorority, the bridegroom a 
member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. 
Irene R. Abraham, Nursing '57, to Dr. 
Lewis M. Nebens, on August 25, 1957. 
Miriam Louise Croft, Nursing '52, to 
Mr. Leon Thomas Dunbar, on Novem- 
ber 30, 1957. 

Patricia Catherine Davidson, Nursing 
'56, to Mr. Robert B. Brooks, in April, 
1957. 

Barbara Lois Duvall, Nursing '57, to 
Lt. Charles Asphen, on August 3, 1957. 
Edna Carolyn Hackett, Nursing '57, to 
Mr. Tod Messick, in June, 1957. 
Myrtle June Kite, Nursing '44, to Mr. 
Robert William Ageton, on June 1. 
1957. 

Elsie Schuff, Nursing '48, to Mr. 
George Geidel, on August 30, 1957. 
(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



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as a Bagpipe" bulls average near- 
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Address: J. B. LINGLE, Mgr. 



WE PLANTATION, Queenstowti.Md. 



J.I 



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— Telephones — 

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P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

(^sssssssssssssssssssssss^ 
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Lumber 

poultry 

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FEEDS livestock 



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Water Front Farms 

OFFICE PHONE TA 2-3113 

RESIDENCE TA 2-3043 

TIDEWATER INN EASTON. MD. 



THE 

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Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

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PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



SWEETHEART 

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SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



57 



Be a MEAT EXPERT! 

Always say 



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ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is cax-efully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to wholesome, 
flavorful perfection. Be sure to 
ask for Esskay Franks — they're 
the finest made! They're on sale in 
the Byrd Stadium and new Stu- 
dent Activities Building. 

Wm. SCHLUDERBERG— T. J. KURDLE CO. 




John J. <& F. Rowland 

McGINIT Y 

Prescription Pharmacists 

Eastern & Ellwood Aves. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co. 

211 E. Baltimore St. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

Photostats — Blue Prints 

Tracing Reproductions on 

Linen, Vellum, Film and 

Autopositives 

Photographic Murals 

Laminating 

PHOTOGRAPHY 



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SUBSCRIBE TO 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Dorothy Louise Stein, Nursing '57, to 
Mr. Kenneth Gerald York, on Novem- 
ber 9. 1957. 

Louisa Maria Cushwa to Mr. John 
Thomas McDonald. Engr. '51. 
Patricia Ann Thayer, Nursing '57, to 
Mr. Roman Nagorka. on July 27, 1957. 
Kathryn Ada Speicher. Ed. '54. to Mr. 
Gilbert Patterson Smith, on June 16, 
1957. 

Patricia Mulvey to Richard J. Logue, 
on December 28. 1957. 
Martha Rutledge Thiemeyer to Lt. 
(j.g.) Snowden Cameron Ager. 
Katherine Bowie Duckett, B.P.A. '57, 
to Mr. DeWolfe Hugo Miller. Jr., on 
November 14. 

Marilyn Weidenbaum. A. & S. '57, to 
Mr. Stanley Cohen, on November 24, 
1957. 

Carolyn Taylor Quick to Mr. Kenneth 
Wayne Sokalski, a former student in the 
College of Engineering, on November 
28. 1957. 



28, 



BIRTHS 



to: 



Mr. and Mrs. John E. Bosley (Sally 
Frances Fritz, Nursing '53), a daughter, 
Lisa Marlene, on September 28, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Clary (Louise 
Dukes Magruder, Nursing '42), a son, 
Thomas Austin, Jr., on October 30, 
1957. Their first, Mary Louise, was 
born in Hawaii. 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Edward Davis 
(Patricia Lee Mullican. Nursing '55), a 
son, George Edward, on August 10, 
1957. 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Donnelly 
(Jean Warfield, Nursing '48), a daugh- 
ter, Mary Irene, on October 1, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kline, Jr. (Janet 
Louise Eyster, Nursing '52), a daugh- 
ter, on October 28, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stanley Michael 
(Patricia Ann Wolfe, Nursing '54), a 
daughter, Kathryn Elizabeth, on August 
25, 1957. 

Captain and Mrs. Paul A. Moore 
(Ernestine Johnson. Nursing '44), a 
son, Thomas Arthur, on June 13, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. May (Carolyn 
Miller, Nursing '52), a daughter on 
August 25, 1957. 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul D. McCoy (Joanne 
A. Wilson, Nursing '51), a son, 
Timothy Paul, on September 1, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barry D. Murphy (Bar- 
bara Eileen Burchett, Nursing '54), 
another daughter. Dawn Ruth, on 
September 13, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne A. Reber, Jr. (Fae 
L. Renningcr, Nursing '53), a son, 
Thomas Alan, on October 26, 1957. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris L. Renshaw 
(Nancy Jean Strong, Nursing '52), a 



daughter, Leslie Ann, on October 
1957. 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Robertson 
(Shirley V. Pratt, Nursing '43), a 
daughter, Karen Elizabeth, on Novem- 
ber 2, 1957. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Sharp (Clara 
Frasco, Nursing '45), a second daugh- 
ter, on September 6, 1957. 
Dr. and Mrs. Herbert K. Speers 
(Katherine Swint. Nursing '54), a 
daughter. Karen Diane, on December 
16. 1956. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Valentine 
(Helen Winks, Nursing '51), a daugh- 
ter, Nancy Janine. on September 13, 
1957. Also, Thomas Ross, on March 
7, 1956, which, through an oversight, 
was not reported in the 1956 Bulletin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Hodgson, 
Engr. '54, a daughter, Nancy Lee, on 
November 26, 1957. 
Dr. and Mrs. N. Jerome Chapin. D.D.S. 
'52, a son, David Alan, on October 13, 
1957. 

Mr. and Mrs. Saul S. Seltzer, Engr. '52, 
a daughter, Lori-Jill, on October 14, 
1957. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanford W. Berman. 
Engr. '50, a son. Scott Mitchell, on 
August 2, 1957. 

Isadore and Linda Kessler, H. Ec. 
'55, a daughter Geri Lynn, on June 
24, 1957. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



Alumni obituaries should be 
sent to the attention of the Editor, 
Maryland Magazine, Administra- 
tion Annex Building, University 
of Maryland, College Park. 



58 



DR. ARTHUR L. STRENGE 

Dr. Arthur L. Strenge, Dent. '13, died 
January 7, 1958 after a long illness. 
He had practiced dentistry in Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts for 45 years. 

He graduated from Dental School 
with the highest honors in the class. 
He was a member of the Cum Laudc 
Society, the honor society at Maryland. 
In 1931 he was made an honorary 
member of the Omicron Kappa Upsi- 
lon, the honorary dental fraternity at 
commencement exercise at the Uni- 
versity. The society was organized to 
recognize meritorious work done by 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Cum Laude graduates of the School. 

Dr. Strenge was a member ol the 
Berkshire Shrine Club. He was inter- 
ested in the work of the Shriners Hos- 
pital in Springfield, and lor mam years 
made regular visits to Springfield to 
assist the staff in wink with the crippled 
children. 

He was a member of the Crescent 
Lodge of Masons, and belonged to the 
Melha Temple in Springfield. 

Dr. Strenge received state and na- 
tional recognition for his work in 
dentistry. He was cited by the Mas- 
sachusetts Dental Society lor his work. 
He was named Chairman of the Oral 
Surgery Section for 1932. The Society 
considered this post an extreme honor. 
It usually had been headed by pro- 
fessors or instructors in oral surgery. 

Dr. Strenge was a life member of the 
American Dental Society and held of- 
fices in the state and Western District 
Dental Society. He was also a mem- 
ber of the National Alumni Associa- 
tion of the University of Maryland 
Dental School. 

DR. WALTER S. LONGO 

Dr. Walter S. Longo, D.D.S. '22, suf- 
fered a fatal heart attack recently while 
driving his car. 

Dr. Longo was a member of Psi 
Omega Dental Fraternity and the Har- 
ris-Hayden Odontological Society. In 
addition, he was Vice President of the 
New England Alumni Association, 
Connecticut Chapter and a charter 
member of the New England Club. Dr. 
Longo was a loyal alumnus of the Uni- 
versity throughout his lifetime. 

He is survived by his wife; a son. 
Dr. Frank Longo, Med. '55; a brother; 
two sisters; and one grandson. 

DR. KUHNEN 

Dr. Herbert Kuhnen, Dentistry '04, of 
Baden-Baden. Germany, died early in 
1957. Dr. Kuhnen, a fine representative 
of his Alma Mater, was highly regarded 
in his community not only for his pro- 
fessional contributions to its welfare but 
also for his warm spirit of interest in 
the general activities of his fellow 
citizens. 

A. A. YASBEC 

Funeral services were held in St. 
Bernard's Catholic Church, Riverdale, 
for Albert A. Yasbec of Bladensburg, 
who was killed on December 6 in an 
automobile accident in Chilleurs Aux- 
Sios, France. Mr. Yasbec, 28, lived at 
4915 Taylor Street, Bladensburg. About 
a year ago he went to France with the 
Emerson Radio Corporation on a 
United States Army project. 

(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL, 1958 



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59 





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4316 GALLATIN STREET 
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E. H. YOUNG 

Eldridge Hood Young, Law '07, died 
of pneumonia December 5, 1957, at 
the Franklin Square Hospital. He had 
recently marked his fiftieth anniversary 
as a practicing attorney. 

DR. MCDONNEL 

Dr. Henry B. McDonnell, 46 years a 
member of the faculty of the Uni- 
versity, died February 9 at Leland 
Memorial Hospital, Riverdale, Mary- 
land. He was 94. 




60 



Dr. McDonnell came to Maryland 
Agricultural College as Professor of 
Chemistry in 1891. He also served as 
State Chemist, Head of the Department 
of Chemistry, Professor of Research 
and Dean of Applied Science. He 
gained considerable recognition in 
scientific circles through his experi- 
ments concerning the characteristics 
of ozone. 

After his retirement in 1937, Dr. 
McDonnell was active in a number of 
organizations, which included the Vans- 
ville Farmers' Club, of which he was a 
long-time President, and the Birming- 
ham Masonic Lodge, where he served 
for a time as Grand Master. He was 
also President of the Association of 
Official Agricultural Chemists, a mem- 
ber of the original Board of Directors of 
the Citizens Bank of Maryland, and an 
organizer of the College Park Fire 
Department. 

DR. HARRY W. SMITH 

Dr. Harry W. Smith, D.D.S. '22, died 
recently in Doctors Hospital in Wash- 
ington, D. C, at the age of 57. He had 
practiced dentistry in the city since 
1923 and was an active member of the 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Washington Board of Trade, the 
Corinthian Yacht Club and the Ameri- 
can Dental Society. 

MRS. H. T. COOK 

Mrs. Harold T. Cook, a statistician in 
the Animal Husbandry Department at 
the University, died of a heart attack 
recently at her home in University Park. 
She is survived by her husband who is 
Assistant Chief of the Biological 
Sciences Branch of the Agriculture De- 
partment, two married daughters, and 
two grandchildren. 

DR. ALBERT S. HARDEN 

Dr. Albert S. Harden. Med. '01, who 
practiced medicine in Newark, New 
Jersey for over 50 years, died recently 
in St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, of 
a brief illness. He was a charter mem- 
ber and former President of the Essex 
County Anatomical and Pathological 
Society, a charter member and a foun- 
der of the Doctors' Chorus, a fellow of 
the American College of Surgeons, and 
a member of the Essex County and 
New Jersey Medical Societies and of 
the American Medical Association. 

BERT L. SHAFFNER 

An automobile accident claimed the life 
of Mr. Bert L. Shaffner on December 
19th. Mr. Shaffner was in charge of the 
Physics Shop at the University of Mary 
land until his retirement in 1954. He 
set up most of the equipment of the 
Physics Department when it was moved 
to its present building. His skill in the 
construction of research and teaching 
equipment was an essential part in 
many of the physics programs, and 
many students learned from him the 
ingenuity, patience, and skill required 
in making scientific devices. 

DR. LEO J. O'HEARN 

Dr. Leo J. O'Hearn, D.D.S. '13, died 
November 22 at the home of his son in 
Champaign, Illinois. He is survived by 
his wife, a son Dr. James W. O'Hearn, 
D.D.S. '45, and a daughter, Mrs. D. 
William Kay. In addition there are four 
grandchildren. 

BURWELL B. POWELL 

Burwell B. Powell, Agriculture '27. 
passed away October 2, 1957, after a 
prolonged illness. 

Wounded in World War I. he spent 
several years in the hospital before 
entering the University of Maryland. 
He was a charter member of Alpha 
Gamma Rho and a member of Alpha 
Zeta. For the past 25 years he was 
an agricultural economist for the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. 

(Continued on next page) 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



FS 



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Telephone: WAr field 5-K5(,f, 



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or a gala dinner party . . . 

that great taste of Coke 

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of 
COMPLETE LAND TITLE SERVICE 



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Hyattsville, Maryland 

HUBERT K.ARNOLD. Pres. & Counsel 

Class of 1935 



APpleton 
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Washington, D. C. 

DOROTHY A. GILES, 
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61 



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Mr. Powell is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Hilda M. Powell and two chil- 
dren, both Maryland graduates, Bur- 
well F. Powell, a chemist for Merck 
Company in New Jersey and Miss Doris 
M. Powell, a nurse at Mt. Wilson Hos- 
pital, Baltimore. 

DR. HICKS 

Dr. Harry Wilbur Hicks, Dentistry '09, 
died in April, 1957. A native of 
Charlestown, Massachusetts, Dr. Hicks 
practiced for five years in Maiden be- 
fore removing to Boston, where he 
practiced till his retirement in 1946. 

DR. GEMSKI 

Dr. Henry John Gemski, Dentistry '38, 
of New Haven, Connecticut, died on 
October 20. Dr. Gemski specialized in 
oral surgery and was a member of the 
New England Society of Oral Surgeons. 
Born in New Haven on November 20, 
1911, he attended Hillhouse High 
School and the University of Richmond. 
He was a member of the Parking Com- 
mission of the Town of East Haven, 
Past President of the Polish Business 
and Professional Men's Association, and 
Past Commander of the F. J. Stempick 
Post of the American Legion. Dr. 
Gemski served in the Navy Dental 
Corps during World War II. He was a 
member of Psi Omega. Besides his wife, 
Mrs. Genevieve Sigsworth Gemski, he 
is survived by two children, Barbara 
and Henry John; a brother, Joseph; and 
five sisters: Mrs. Alex Passick, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Gross, Mrs. Arthur Pascay, Mrs. 
Lee Kramarczyk, and Miss Stella 
Gemski. 

DR. LOFTUS 

Dr. John Leo Loftus, Dentistry '05, 
died on November 3. A native of Boyls- 
ton, Mass., where he was born on May 
27, 1880, Dr. Loftus practiced in 
Meriden, Connecticut, from 1905 to 
1941. In 1929 he began to practice also 
in Hartford. From 1941 till his retire- 
ment in 1949 he practiced only in the 
latter city. Following postgraduate work 
at New York University and the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, Dr. Loftus began to 
specialize in Periodontia in 1929. He 
was the first Hartford dentist to 
specialize in that field and he was the 
first from Connecticut to be elected to 
membership in the American Academy 
of Periodontology. Dr. Loftus was Past 
President of the New England Dental 
Society (1949), Past Exalted Ruler of 
the Meriden Lodge of Elks, a charter 
member of the Meriden Rotary Club, 
and a member of Psi Omega. He is 
survived by a daughter, Mrs. James 
Lidgate, of Worcester, Massachusetts, 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



and two brothers: Walter LoftUS, of 
Worcester, and Henry Lottus, of Little 
Valley. New York. 

DR. BELL 

Dr. Donald Arthur Bell, Dentistry, '52, 
of Baltimore, died on July 9. Dr. Bell 
received his B. A. degree from Johns 
Hopkins University in 1948. At 
Hopkins he became a member of Phi 
Kappa Sigma fraternity. Following his 
graduation from Maryland. Dr. Bell 
served for two years in the Navy Dental 
Corps. He practiced in Baltimore for 
two years before illness forced him to 
give up his practice. During the few 
years of his professional career. Dr. 
Bell had indicated that he was capable 
of making an excellent record in 
dentistry. He was a member of the 
Gorgas Odontological Society and Psi 
Omega. He is survived by his parents 
Vernal and Myrtle Tschudy Bell, and 
a sister, Mrs. John H. Howard, Jr. 

OR. TYLER 

Dr. John E. Tyler, Dentistry '17, of 
Worcester, Massachusetts, died on 
November 24. A stalwart figure in New 
England dentistry. Dr. Tyler was a very 
loyal alumnus who possessed a deep 
feeling of pride in his alma mater and 
by his noteworthy contributions to his 
profession constantly acted as an out- 
standing alumnus. A Past President of 
the New England Dental Society and a 
former Regent of the American College 
of Dentists, he was an enthusiastic 
worker in the organization of study 
clubs in the Worcester District Society 
and a leader in the establishment of 
dental clinics in the public schools of 
Worcester. During World War I Dr. 
Tyler served overseas in the Army 
Dental Corps and during World War 
II he was the Procurement and Assign- 
ment Officer for the dentists in his 
district. For several years he served as 
chairman of the Worcester Community 
Health Council, a contribution that 
earned for him the grateful appreciation 
of his fellow citizens. Dr. Tyler is 
survived by his wife, Mrs. Frances Slade 
Tyler; a daughter, Mrs. Lincoln A. 
Divoll, of Andover, Massachusetts; and 
four sons: John E., Jr., a member of 
the faculty of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, Richard J., of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut. Frank, of Worcester, and 
Dr. Robert J. Tyler, '54, who was as- 
sociated in his father's practice. 

DR. PINES 

Dr. Benjamin Pines (Pinsky), Dentistry 
'26, of Baltimore, died on May 6, 1957. 
Dr. Pines was a member of Phi Alpha 
fraternity and the Gorgas Odontological 
Society. 

MARCH-APRIL. 1958 



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63 



Acme Iron Works 33 

Advertisers Engraving Company 44 

Advertisers Mat Service 27 

Alcazar 63 

American Disinfectant Company 50 

American Office Equipment Co., lnc 56 

Anchor Post Products (Anchor Fence) 41 

C. J. Anderson 32 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Association 38 

I G. Arwood & Co., lnc 54 

Alvin L. Aubinoe Outside Back Cover 

A\ ignone Freres 32 



B & B Exterminator Co 35 

Baltimore Asphalt Block & Tile Co 46 

Baltimore Check Room Service 63 

Baltimore Envelope Co 39 

Baltimore Gas & Electric Company 24 

Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co 58 

Bank of Crisfield 56 

Barber & Ross Hardware, lnc 40 

Bard Avon School 59 

The Barn 48 

Barllett Real Estate 57 

Jeanette Beck. lnc 30 

Bergmann's Laundry 60 

Edward Boker Frosted Foods, lnc 42 

Bornmann-Pattyson Opticians, lnc 54 

Harry A. Boswell Co 53 

F. S. Bowen Electrical Contractor 61 

Brentwood Inn 47 

Briggs Construction Co.. lnc 62 

Briggs Meat Product Co 53 

Dexter E. Bryan 43 

Buck Glass Company 35 

Buell's Carburetor & Ignition Service 42 



Capitol Frito Co., lnc 43 

Carey Machinery & Supply Co 39 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 51 

Chaconas, Florists 41 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 38 

Chesapeake Creameries 59 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 50 

Clodfelter's Service 29 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 26 

Cohn & Bock Co 57 

Cokesbury Book Store 31 

Colony Press 30 

Columbia Federal Savings & Loan 

Association 60 

Comfort Limb & Brace Co 48 

Wm. Cook Funeral Home 35 

A. Myron Cowell, lnc 29 

Criss Brothers & Co 42 

Crosse & Blackwell Co 37 

Crout, Snyder & Crandall 63 

Crown Oil & Wax Co 44 

Cullen Photo Co 42 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 36 

Crawford Retreat 48 



Jack Daniels Buick, lnc 36 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 56 

F. A. Davis & Sons 34 

I). C, Ignition Headquarters, lnc 36 

Del-Haven White House Motel 59 

J. H. DeVeau & Sons, lnc 43 

Dietrich & Gambrill, lnc 44 

Dietrich Bros., lnc 49 

Domino Restaurant 33 

Drummond & Co., lnc 49 



Norman S. Earley & Son 45 

Embassy Camera Center 27 

C. Engels & Sons 42 



Directory of Advertisers 

Farmers Cooperative Association 45 

J.. H. Filbert, lnc 47 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 54 

First National Bank of Baltimore 25 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... 44 

Frederick Underwriters, lnc 44 

Fuller & d'Albert, lnc 33 

Garamond Press 39 

S. A. Gatti & Son, lnc 50 

Henry B. Gilpin Co 33 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co.. lnc 48 

Goodbody & Company 45 

Karl M. Graf & Co 32 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 44 

Hammond Bros., lnc 34 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 49 

Hannes Formal Wear 59 

Harford Metal Products, lnc 45 

Harrington Hotel 53 

Harvey Dairy, lnc 54 

Hedin House Hotel 62 

Hendler's Ice Cream 46 

Hillyard Sales Co 54 

Robert F. Hoff 40 

The Hoffberger Co 44 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

House in the Pines 46 

Huffer-Shinn Optical Co 53 

George Hyman Construction Co 52 



International Travel Dept. A. A. A. 



32 



Eddie Jacobs 38 

Johnston. Lemon & Co 51 

Frank B. Jones 52 

N. E. Kefauver, Jr 45 

Kefauver Lumber Co 44 

Kidwell & Kidwell, lnc 50 

King Bros., Inc. Printing 56 

Kingsville Inn 59 

Earle Kirkley, Inc., Florists 31 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 38 

Koontz Creamery, lnc 39 

Kramer Hardware & Supply Co 36 

Woodrow H. Kratz 37 

Lamar & Wallace 53 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince Georges 

Co., lnc 61 

Maurice Leeser Co 56 

Charles W. Lienau & Co 58 

Loewy Drug Co., lnc 35 

Lord Calvert Hotel 53 

Loveless Electric Co 41 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 51 

Mangels, Herold Co., lnc 63 

Maria's Restaurant 37 

Martin's. Importers 30 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 44 

Masser's Motel & Restaurant 45 

Meadowgold Ice Cream Co 29 

Harry S. MicKey Electric Co 44 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assn 38 

Miller Brothers 31 

Mischanton's Restaurant 30 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., lnc 38 

Modern Machinist Co 53 

Modern Stationery Co 59 

Moon Palace 31 

Morgan & Millard. lnc 58 

Morrison & Bready. lnc 40 

Music Box (Langley Music Time) 42 

Myers & Quigg, lnc 52 

John J. & F. Rowland McGinity 58 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co 62 

McNeill Surveys, lnc 40 



National Bank of Cambridge 57 

National Equipment & Supply Co 62 

Norman Motor Co 40 

North Washington Press, lnc 60 

Old Dutch Tile Co 60 

Oles Envelope Corp 49 

Olney Inn 50 

W. K. Pace Co 52 

Palmer Ford, lnc 41 

Park Transfer Co 33 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors. lnc 47 

Perpetual Building Association 33 

R. B. Phelps Stone Co 36 

Pioneer Refrigeration Co 63 

Place Vendome 32 

Poor. Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy, lnc 47 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 36 

Quick Service Laundry 50 

Refrigeration Supply Co 53 

Restorff Motors 54 

Rex Engraving Co 47 

Katherine Robb Nursing Home 34 

Rocco's Charcoal House 53 

Roma Restaurant 38 

Rose Exterminator Co 25 

Sade & Company 50 

Safeway Trailways 28 

Salisbury Milling Co 56 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 49 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) 58 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 41 

Shoreham Hotel 51 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 60 

Russell W. Smith, Insurance 63 

Southeastern Floor Co 36 

Southern Oxygen Co 36 

Spevak Packing Co 34 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 57 

Stafford Hotel 34 

Standard Engineering Co 62 

Star Baking Co 57 

Wm. P. Stein, lnc 30 

Sturdee Metal Products Co 46 

Suburban Trust Co 41 

Mano Swartz Furs 31 

Sweetheart Bakers 57 

Thomas Distributing Co 45 

Thomsson Steel Co 40 

Wm. J. Tickner & Sons, lnc 56 

Trailer Village 37 

United Clay Products Co 27 

Velleggia's Italian Restaurant 49 

James T. Vernay & Sons Co 25 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 29 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works 61 

Washington Refrigeration Co 62 

Washington Stair & Ornamental 

Iron Works, lnc 41 

Watergate Inn — Normandy Farms 41 

J. I. Wells Co., lnc 57 

Perry O. Wilkinson 60 

J. McKenny Willis 57 

W. R. Winslow Co 50 

E. Randolph Wootton Co 34 

Wye Plantation 57 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS 

versus 
COLLEGE ALL AMERICANS 

and world famous theatrical artists 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILIDNG • UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND • COLLEGE PARK 



Monday, April 14 • 8:00 P. M. 



ALL SEATS RESERVED 

$3.00— Courtside $2.50— End Court $2.00— Upper Corner 



All checks should he made payable and should he forwarded to: 

M CLUB 

University of Maryland 
P. O. Box 295 
College Park, Maryland 

A STAMP. SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE MUST ACCOMPANY YOUR ORDER 



WASHINGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 





HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 

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Meeting and Banquet Facilities 



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■ Builder : 



1515 19th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone : 
HUdson 3-6025 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Volume XXIX • Number 4 
May-June • 1958 



URPARY 
J §8 



Alumni Publ iL'atTUT 



of the 



University of Maryland 




In This Issue: 



New Library Dedicated In Honor Oi Com rnor M< Ki i din 
First Annual Alumni Spring Ri union 
University Marks Firsi Far Fasi Commi n< emeni 
Introducing Thi University Rf.of.nts 



The Three-way Benefits of 
Good Telephone Earnings 




USERS 



EMPLOYEES 



INVESTORS 



They benefit the telephone customer by 
providing the means to expand and improve 
the service and do it economically. 

They benefit employees because they help 
to provide good jobs. 

The)' benefit the investor by protecting 
his savings and insuring a good and secure 
return on his investment. 

There is, indeed, no basis for the belief 
that keeping telephone earnings low is a sure 
road to keeping rates low. 

Such a philosophy, by limiting progress 
and long-pull economics, will lead almost 
always to the opposite result . . . poorer serv- 
ice at a higher price than the customer would 
otherwise have to pay. 

In all lines of business, it's the companies 
whose earnings are good that are able to 
make the best products, provide the best 
service, and give the best values. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




Maryland 




( ()\ I l<: 

Members oi the (lass ol 1913, meeting for (hen -i^iii Reunion, watch the 
Alumni-Varsit] Football game from the vantage oi the Byrd Staduim P 
Hov An article describing the Hist annual aliinini Spring Reunion begins on 
page 10. Seated thud from the leit is l)r Frederic I Mavis, Dean <>t the 
College ol Engineering. Immediately to his right is \li ( . M. White. President 
ot the Republic Steel Corporation, I ngineering '13. 



the 



Maryland 



MAY JUNE • 1958 



magazine 



Volume XXIX 



Number 4 



Alumni Publication of 
the University of Maryland 

BO ARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
ALVIN L. AUBINOE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF T HE ALUMNI AS SOCI A TION 

JOSEPH H. DECKMAN, '31, President 
FRANK BLOCK, '24, Vice-President 
MISS FLORA STREETT, '38, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (EM 3-2553) 



In This Issue — 


FEATURES 






2 


Alumni Diary 




4 


Campus Notes 




6 


New Library Dedicated In Honor of Governor McKeldin 




10 


Alumni Have A Fine Time At First Annual Spring Reunion 




14 


University Marks First Far East Commencement 




16 


Introducing the University Regents 




19 


News From The Clubs 




20 


Sports 


NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS ANE 


COLLEGES 








24 
27 


Agriculture 






Arts and Sciences 




Photograph Credits 


30 


Air Science 




Cover: Al Danegger (Staff) 


30 


Business and Public Administration 




p. 4: Al Danegger (Staff) 








p. 5: Top: Al Danegger (Stall) 


38 


Dentistry 




Bottom: U. S. Department ol 


43 


Education 




Agriculture 








p. 6: Top Left: Al Danegger (Stall) 


47 


Engineering 




Top Right: Werner Severin 
(Staff) 


49 


Home Economics 




p. 7: Werner Severin (Stall) 


50 


Law 




P 


9: Werner Severin (Stall) 


53 


Medicine 




P 


10: Al Danegger (Staff) 


54 


Nursing 




P 


11: Al Danegger (Staff) 


55 


Special and Continuation Studies 




P 


12: Al Danegger (Staff) 








P 


13: Al Danegger (Staff) 


57 


Social Notes 




P 


14: Pacific Stars and Stripes 

15: Pacific Stars and Stripes 

16: Top: Harris & Ewing. Wuxlt- 


59 


Completed Careers 




P 
P 


64 


Index of Advertisers 




ington, D. C. 

Bottom: Hughes Co.. Balti- 
more 














p. 17: Top: Bachrach, New York 

Bottom: Lore Grossman (Statu 




Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and ei.tered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 











The General Alumni Council: 

(School and College Representatives) 

AGRICULTURE 

Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 

Arthur B. Hamilton, '29 
Clayton Reynolds, '22 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

W. Gilbert Dent, Jr., '26 
Charles Ellinger, '37 
Ralph G. Shure, '32 

BUSINl'.s & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42 
Alvin S. Klein. '37 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 

DENTAL 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene D. Lyon, '38 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, '22 

EDUCATION 



Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr. 
William B. Prigg, '53 



'50 



ENGINEERING 

Joseph H. Deckman, '31 
Charles R. Hayleck, '43 
Howard L. Keller, '43 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

Miss Irene Knox, '34 

LAW 

Leon H. A. Pierson, '23 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 

MEDICAL 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. Mary France Dennis, '47 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Miss Flora M. Streett, '38 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



Ex-Officio Members of the 
Council: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur [. Bell, '19, Past President 



Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 

Baltimore — Samuel Silber, '34 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

Richard E. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '39 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher, '37 
Pittsburgh— Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

commencement is here again. As we extend a hearty welcome to some 2,500 
new alumni of the Class of 1958 who now join our ranks, we take time with them 
to enjoy the present, to appreciate the past, and to hope for the future. 

This is commencement time when we complete a period in our development 
and look with great enthusiasm to the days ahead. Many of the older graduates 
returned this year for class reunions, spring reunions, school and commencement 
reunions. For the first time in twenty-five to fifty years, paths that ran parallel 
during a "long-ago" period have again crossed in happy reunion. 

In saying "hello" to the new and in glancing back to the past with a parade 
of new and old friends we can only conclude that commencement is a wonderful 
time. The University and the Alumni Association gain with the addition of each 
graduating class. For the new alumni the future is bright. They have not only the 
heritage of the past, the successes of the many who preceded them, and the 
challenge of a world which needs leaders as never before, but they have also the 
advantage of fine instruction from one of the great universities of our country. 

The Alumni Association has also taken a second look, and while recognizing 
the high standards of the past, its leaders are convinced the full potential of 
service, dedication, and recognition is yet ahead. Those to whom the University 
means so much have recognized and accepted an obligation. As we stand upon 
the commencement spring board facing a great new era in education and a 
renewed alumni interest, it may well be in order to review actions of the Alumni 
Council which are designed to continue the Alumni Association in a strong, 
aggressive, and constructive effort. The Association has pledged more than $6,000 
toward the furnishing of an Alumni Room in the new Student Union planned for 
the Baltimore campus. Special priority is being given the formation of alumni clubs 
which will, of course, require the backing of many individual alumni. Through 
the Scholarship Committee a Student Loan Fund is being established and as- 
surance has been given that scholarships initiated by the Alumni Association will 
be continued and expanded in the days ahead. A great factor in the initial success 
of the Greater University Fund effort has been the volunteer work and the con- 
tributions of many alumni. The "M" Club is particularly congratulated for 
unusual service related to the Alumni-Varsity Football Game and the basket- 
ball game from which proceeds were obtained to greatly assist in the scholarship 
program. 

Many are the efforts which may be credited to the alumni and the Alumni 
Association but the main purpose of this visit with alumni friends is to let the many 
who have served so well know how their efforts have been appreciated. While 
at the same time, we say to those who now become a part of the University of 
Maryland Alumni Association we have a place for you and we are sure you are 
going to enjoy your part in helping us help the Alumni Association grow and 
progress. May the future be all that you want it to be and may you in your own 
way include both the University and the Alumni Association in that future. Many 
of us have! 

As ever. 



/ 6^< — , 




David L. Brigham 
A Imnni Secretary 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Their Future and Yours 



Depend on Our Colleges 



As Americans, ;ill of us arc proud of our national 
growth. But it Is a sobering though! that the 
number of young men and women who wanl and 
deserve a college education will double by L967, 

Right now our colleges and universities arc 
making a valiant effort to take care of the hosts 
of eager-eyed young people who are already clam- 
oring for admittance. They have an enormous job 
to do, for t he necessary expansion is far more than 
a matter of adding classrooms, laboratories and 
dormitory space. There must be a corresponding 
increase in faculty and in faculty caliber. The 
profession of college teaching must attract more 
first-rate men and women or it will be in danger 
of turning out second-rate graduates. 



This problem of t he capacitj of our i 

to meet the challenge thai Is now upon u i 
not only to students and their parents bul al 

business lo industry and to you. 

It is easy to point to current short 

neers and scientists. Less obvious but ju 

pressing is t he need for ci\ ic leaders for teachei 
— for business administrators for home-makers. 

Above all there is a need for people who have 
learned to think soundly and choo Ij , They 

are and will continue to be the bad. hone of our 
strength as a nation. 

Freedom needs educated people. In this coun- 
try, those who lead are those who kimn-. Help the 
colleges or universities of your choice— now! 




If you want to know more about what the college crisis means 
to you, send for the free booklet "The Closing College Door" 
to: Box 36, Times Square Station, New York 36, New York. 




HIGHER EDUCATION 




KEEP IT BRIGHT 



MAY-JUNE, 1958 




CAMPUS NOTES 



Dk. GEORGE ENTWISLE, ASSISTANT 

Professor of Medicine and Director 
of the University's Outpatient Medical 
Department, has been named to suc- 
ceed Dr. Maurice Pincoffs as Pro- 
fessor and Head of the Department of 
Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation. 
Dr. Pincoffs retired in June. 1957. 

Born in Bolton, England, Dr. Ent- 
wisle attended the Brighton High 
School. He obtained a B.S. degree in 
1945 from the University of Mas- 
sachusetts and an M.D. degree from 
Boston University in 1948. 

Following an internship at the Mas- 
sachusetts Memorial Hospital, he was 
appointed a Fellow in the Boston Uni- 
versity Department of Physiology. He 
was promoted to Fellow in Medicine 
and Lecturer in Physiology in 1950. 

Between 1951 and 1955, he served as 
an Assistant Resident and later, as Resi- 
dent in Medicine at the Evans Memorial 
Hospital, Massachusetts, and as an 
Instructor in medicine at the Boston 
University School of Medicine. 

Dr. Entwisle was in private practice 
in Massachusetts with medical associates 
of Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 
until his appointment at the University 
of Maryland in 1956. 

The new Department head is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Associa- 
tion. American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, Massachusetts 
and Baltimore City Medical Societies, 
New York Academy of Science and 
Sigma Xi. 

BOURBON LEADER! GROVER CLEVELAND 

AND THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

BY HORACE SAMUEL Ml K K 1 1 I 

Within the covers of this volume is 
found the historv of a man and the his- 



tory of an era. Very often we identify 
eras with men, but it seems to be partic- 
ularly appropriate in the case of Grover 
Cleveland. He was the essence of Bour- 
bon Democracy in his outlook and in 
his policy-making. Conservative, honest, 
outspoken, he stood for "good govern- 
ment" in a time when the corruptions 
in government and politics, notably 
Tammany, were fresh in the indignant 
public's mind. 

Nevertheless, Cleveland was no great 
reformer; he did little to improve the 
"spoils system" within the Civil Serv- 
ice; it was his outspokenness and obvi- 
ous honesty that won the voters to him. 
Cleveland was not an expert politician 
but was fortunate to be aided by those 
who were. He refused to campaign for 
the Presidency, claiming it to be un- 
fitting to the dignity of that office. He 
is the only President ever to serve two 
terms nonconsecutively. 

This book is extremely readable: the 
style is clear and concise, the facts are 
presented in the light of historical anal- 
ysis which points up their significance. 
Dr. Merrill neither says too little nor 
too much. Cleveland the man stands 
out sharply as does Cleveland the public 
servant. The author is obviously 
thoroughly acquainted with both th; 
man and h : s era and is capable there- 
fore of presenting the main issues 
clearly and with great understand^. 

Dr. Merrill is a full Professor in th? 
Department of History, where he 
teaches American History. Other pub- 
lications of his include Bourbon Demo- 
cracy of the Middle West, William 
Freeman Vilas, "Ignatius Donnelly. 
James J. Hill, and Cleveland Adminis- 
tration Patronage" (Mississippi Vallej 
Historical Review, 1952), "The Su- 
preme Court and Economic Policy" 



(chapter in Problems in American De- 
mocracy). 

DR. BENTZ APPOINTED 
ASSISTANT IN PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Dr. Frank L. Bentz, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Agronomy, has been ap- 
pointed Assistant in the Office of the 
President. 

Dr. Bentz will assist the administra- 
tion in preparing for orderly growth 
and development in a period when the 
University must prepare for a doubled 
enrollment by 1970. 




Dr. Bentz 

A native of Hagerstown, Dr. Bentz 
was graduated with first honors and re- 
ceived a B. S. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1942. 

He was commissioned a second lieu- 
tenant in the U. S. Army and served in 
campaigns in France. Belgium and Hol- 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



land between 1942 and [946. He was 
discharged with the rank of captain. 

Between 1950 and 1955, he was an 
assistant in the Soil Testing laboratory. 
During this period he obtained a Ph. 

D. degree in Agronomy. In 1955. he 
was appointed Assistant Professor. He 
was promoted to Associate Professor 
in 1956. 

Dr. Bent/, holds membership in 
Alpha Zeta and Sigma Xi. honorary 
agricultural fraternities, and the Ameri- 
can Society of Agronomy and the Soil 
Science Society of America. 

Since 1951. Dr. Bentz has published 
more than 25 articles in the field of 
agronomy and related subjects. 

BALTIMORE UNION-DORMITORY 
SCHEDULED FOR COMPLETION IN 1959 

The new Baltimore Union-Dormitory 
Building, to be located on the south- 
west corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets, will be, when completed in 
1959, the realization of years of work 
and planning. 

Although the primary purpose of the 
structure will be to house, in dormitory 
apartments, students from all schools 
receiving instruction on the Baltimore 
campus, the architect has incorporated 
into his design facilities for the use of 
alumni and faculty. 

Located in the basement will be 
game rooms, a book and instrument 
store, post office, barber shop and 
various storage facilities. A cafeteria, 
kitchen, lobby and lounge are planned 
for the first floor. The second floor will 
contain a roof garden terrace, lounges, 
offices and several meeting rooms. The 
third, fourth and fifth floors will con- 
tain 33 double bedroom units each, ac- 
commodating a total of 198 students. 
A second companion structure has also 
been designed and duplicates the basic 
design of unit one. If approved for 
construction, this addition would in- 
crease the total student accommodation 
to 456 students. The Baltimore Union- 
Dormitory will be a self-liquidating 
project. 

The Greater University of Maryland 
Fund has as one of its four principal 
objectives the contribution of furnish- 
ings for this vital Baltimore campus 
facility. 

DR. SMADEL PRESENTS FIRST LECTURE 
HONORING DR. MAURICE C. PINCOFFS 

The first in a series of lectures in honor 
of Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs, retired Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Preventive 
Medicine, was presented by Dr. Joseph 

E. Smadel, December 14, in the Old 
Medical School Building, Baltimore. 

(Continued on page 21) 




Dr. J. Edmund Bradley, Professor and Chairman <>j the Department o\ Pediatrics, of- 
ficially accepts a Cordon Armstrong Deluxe Premature Infant Incubator from repre- 
sentatives of the Yorkewood Woman's Club. 

From left, Dr. Bradley: Mrs. Dorothy Herber, in-charge of tin- Department's prema- 
ture nurseries; Mrs. Richard M. Bozman. welfare committee chairman and Mrs. 
Charles E. Knell, president, of the Yorkewood Woman's Club. 

The new incubator permits the maintenance of a continuous (antral level of tempera- 
ture, humidity and oxygen concentration. It is explosion-proof anil can be used in the 
presence of oxygen and other therapeutic gases. 

The Yorkewood club, a 55-member organization, participates in many projects nub 
year. A recent campaign resulted in a completely furnished room at the Maryland 
School For the Blind. 



Mexican buyer and Maryland seller pose with two purebred llol-.lt in heifers, about to 
be loaded for rail shipment to Mexico. On the left is Mrs. Sara C. de Quintanilla, wife of 
Luis Quintanilla, Mexican Ambassador to the Organization of American States; on the 
right is J. Homer Remsberg, Agriculture. 'IS and Past President of the Alumni Council. 
Mr. Remsberg is president of the Purebred Dairy Cattle Association of Ann ran and the 
Maryland-Virginia Milk Producers Association and Director of the Maryland Farm 
Bureau and the Holstein-Freisian Association of America. 

Mrs. Quintanilla has purchased 15 bred heifers from eight Maryland breeders lor use 
as foundation stock for the new dairy herd she is establishing at her ranch. "Hacienda de 
Ortega" near San Luis de la Paz. about 200 miles north of Mexico City. 

The cattle are part of continuing shipments being made to Mexico, largest foreign pur- 
chaser of purebred U. S. breeding cattle. In 1957, the U. S. exported over 12.000 dairy 
cattle with Mexico taking more than 7.500 head. The encouraging of agricultural exports, 
including breeding cattle, is one of the foreign market development activities of the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, through its Foreign Agricultural Service. 




MAY-JUNE. 1958 





New Library Dedicated in Honor of Governor McKeldin 



A DISTINGUISHED GATHERING OF 400 PERSONS INCLUDING 

leading State executive and legislative officers. University of- 
ficials, members of the Board of Regents, student body 
representatives, distinguished librarians, and honored guests 
witnessed the May 3 dedication of the new University library 
named in honor of The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin, 
Governor of the State. 

In his statement describing the purpose of the occasion, 
Dr. Elkins said: 

"This magnificent library building designed to serve the 
individual stands quite properly in the center of the campus. 
It represents years of planning by the administration and 
faculty and the staff and particularly the library staff and it 
has received, as you know, the personal attention of the 
architect and the builder. As a matter of fact, it has received 
personal attention on the part of a great many people, all 
of whom have been quite cooperative, with the exception of 
the weather man. We pay special tribute to the Governor and 
the General Assembly who, in their actions I believe have 
expressed the will of the people to raise the stature of their 
University. They have caused to be erected a storehouse of 
knowledge and in the years to come its stacks and shelves will 
be filled with books and papers and other materials to be 
used for the enlightenment of undergraduates and as source 
material for the advancement of knowledge. To the extent 
that these materials are used to satisfy the needs of man- 
kind and to help him solve the complex problems which beset 
his progress today, we shall be justified in our accomplish- 
ment. The promise of fullfilment, however, makes this a very 
happy occasion, and it's entirely appropriate that this build- 
ing which will remain a symbol of the University's devotion 
to learning should be dedicated to the welfare of all who may 
feel its influence and be named in honor of a man whose 
administration, I trust, will be identified with the develop- 
ment of a greater University. 

"As we strive to produce a quantity of quality to serve the 
State and the nation, these contributions will become in- 
creasingly significant." 



said, "education and health. We want to make considerable 
progress in these areas in the State. A great man, Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, once said that the great thing in the world 
is not so much where one stands as in what direction one is 
moving. In Maryland we are moving forward and we intend 
to keep doing so." 

Bringing commendations from the Maryland House of 
Delegates. The Honorable Perry Wilkinson, Speaker Pro Tern, 
reported, "I know I speak for the General Assembly, especially 
the 123 members of the House of Delegates: we are always 
happy when Dr. Elkins comes to Annapolis to present his 
proposals to us. We will always do everything we can to 
make our University one of the greatest in the world." 

Mr. B. Herbert Brown, Secretary of the Board of Regents, 
read to the assembly the resolution of the Regents naming the 
library in honor of Governor McKeldin. 

Mr. Charles P. McCormick. Chairman of the Board of 
Regents, officially dedicated the new facility. 

"This library," he said, "is more than a collection of bricks 
and mortar. It is more than the cold statistics you find in the 
program. In the last analysis it is enunciation to the 
academic world and to the nation that the University of 
Maryland accepts the challenge of leadership and takes her 
place willingly in the ranks of distinguished institutions. 

"This notable achievement was no accident. It expresses 
the will of the people, acting through their elected represent- 
atives in the General Assembly. This we recognize. It reflects 
the ability and ingenuity of many able University administra- 
tors under the able leadership of President Elkins. and this 
we recognize. But it represents, too, the culminating endeavor 
and great labors on behalf of higher education by the 
man whom we honor here today; a man whom I now 
salute with deep respect, the Honorable Theodore Roosevelt 
McKeldin. Governor of Maryland." 

Mr. McCormick cited the Governor's continuing interest 
in and support of higher education during his tenure in of- 
fice, and unveiled a large bronze plaque commemorating the 
dedication in the Governor's honor. 



The Honorable Louis L. Goldstein, President of the Mary- 
land Senate, brought greetings from that legislative branch. 
"I'll always dedicate myself to two things," Mr. Goldstein 



Governor mckeldin's response touched on the history 
and meaning of the university and the library and stressed 
the importance of programs educating the whole man. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



FACTS AND FIGURES 
NEW MAIN LIBRARY 

Total cost, including bookstacks and archita ti fees', 

$2,467,227.63. 

Cost of furniture and equipment: $200,000. 

Cubic feet of space: 1,974,569 cu. It. 

Square feet of floor space: 190.839 sq. ft. 

Principal materials used: lower exterior walls oi 
Alabama Rockwood limestone, upper walls of reel 
colonial brick, root" of gray slate, wainscot in 
main lobbies and halls of Norwegian rose marble, 
hardware and stair and balcony rails of aluminum. 

Seating capacity: without seminars and auditorium, 
2,000 (seminars will seat about 350. the audi- 
torium 160). 

Architect: Henry Powell Hopkins of Hopkins and 
Pfeiffer, Architects. 10 E. Mulberry St.. Balti- 
more, Md. 

Builder: George Hyman Construction Co.. Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

Interior decorator: Mrs. June C. Wilbur. Assistant 
Professor, Textiles and Clothing. College of Home 
Economics. 



"Sir Issac Newton," he said, "was a great man, one of the 
monumental figures in the history of science, and for a 
student to graduate from this University ignorant of the very 
name of Newton would be scandalous. But I remind you 
that Newton's contemporary. John Milton, was also a great 
man. one of the monumental figures of the history of litera- 
ture, and for a student to graduate ignorant of Milton would 
be equally scandalous. 

"To make the student who majors in physics acquainted 
with Milton, and to make the student who majors in English 
acquainted with Newton, is a long step toward preventing 
either from emerging from this place a half-man, tremen- 
dously learned in one subject but ignorant of all else." 

Governor McKeldin continued. 

"I hope that . . . (the library) will always remain hospitable 
to any book that contains an idea. I include in that not 
only ideas of which I am ignorant, but also ideas of which I 
do not approve. I am against any form of censorship, simply 
because we can acquire no solid appreciation of the strength 
of truth until we know the force of the errors against which 
it has prevailed. 

"I would not exclude from these shelves the work of any 
great heretic, in religion, in philosophy, or in government. 
My reason is that nothing is more important for a young 
man seeking wisdom than to avoid intellectual arrogance; 
and when he learns how even powerful minds can be betrayed 
into fantastic error he will be less likely to assume the 
perfections of his own reasoning. 

"I would not exclude books that the more austere scholars 
condemn as being mere frivolous entertainment, in the first 
place because youth needs a reasonable amount of amuse- 
ment and, in the second place, because what appears at a 
glance to be arrant nonsense often has a hidden significance 
of profound importance. We know today that Alice in 
Wonderland is profoundly philosophical, and the tales of 
Uncle Remus are important in anthropology; yet both were 
originally presented as mere entertainment. 

"In short, any idea that has been recorded by the human 

MAY-JUNE. 1958 
















^Mjiii 




mind has its place here, if the record is clear enough to be 
understood. I admit one reason only for denying a place on 
these shelves to any hook in the world, and that reason is that 
its pages include no vestige of a thought." 

" 1 his library is either a portal to freedom, or it is nothing 
but a waste of money. Through these doors the student 
emerges into a wider, and greater and more wonderful world 
that he had inhabited before." 

I N HIS ADDRESS, MR. VERNER W. CLAPP, PRESIDENT, Library 

Resources, Inc.. presented these views: 

"Let us not be betrayed, then, in this great building to 
which has been given such a commanding view of the campus 
and which in turn is the cynosure of the campus, into think- 
ing that we can get along with just those books which 
statistically are most read, or which summarize the learning 
oJ a subject. Here we must not be afraid to gather much of 
the less important, even perhaps in subjects which are not 
now represented in the curriculum, and in languages which 
no one on the campus now reads. For learning was not 
created by the big names, and certainly not exclusively in 
the Western languages; the record is one of continuous debate, 
of conflicting opinions, of exploded hypotheses, of unsuccess- 
ful attempts, and of confusion of tongues, and the future 
is only too likely to persist in the same way." 




I J 



FIRST FLOOR PLZ.N 



"If American librarianship and American university ad- 
ministration have one point of superiority over those of the 
old world it is in this — that coming fresh to the work, 
unhampered by the dead hand of centuries-old collections 
and systems, they were able to give superior means of both 
physical and bibliographic access to the fewer books which 
they possessed. The result has been a burgeoning of research 
in this country which has been unexampled until it has recently 
been by still another nation which — significantly — deliberately 
borrowed and built on our methodology in library and 
bibliographical technique." 

"We meet today on an occasion for profound satisfaction 
— of satisfaction not only to the administration, the faculty 
and the students of this university, but to every citizen of 
the State of Maryland, and to everyone who believes that the 
best obtainable education and the utmost understanding of 
man and his universe is hardly enough for the adequate dis- 
charge of the responsibilities of a citizen of the present day. 
This noble building, its splendid location, its excellent ar- 
rangement and equipment, its happy employment of decora- 
tive materials and schemes without infringement upon its 
practical mission or incurrence of extravagant expenditure — 
all these are matters for congratulation. But more — in this 
building a spirit has been given proud and worthy residence; 
it is the spirit of free inquiry informed by fullest knowledge — 
the spirit that is the true bequest to our day of Plato ami 



Aristotle and Thomas Jefferson and of the large and truly 
human minds of the past — the essential spirit of the uni- 
versity." 

Since its opening for student use in January, the main 
Library has become the most popular building on campus. 
This is due in part to the expanded facilities available and 
part to the inherent good looks of the building itself. Stu- 
dents relax in study and research areas well-lighted with 
fluorescent fixtures, studded with attractive chairs and deep 
upholstered arm chairs and two-seat sofas, and decorated with 
14 wall colors, six tile colors and three bookcase colors. 
Step risers are brown, green and gray terrasso; pink, beige 
and off-white marble facing line the main stairways. Re- 
sponsible for the decorating tour de force is Mrs. June C. 
Wilbur. Assistant Professor, Textiles and Clothing, College 
of Home Economics. 

The excellent interior decoration, of course, is but icing 
on a well-designed, functional operating cake. The follow- 
ing service descriptions may be located as to area occupied 
on the floor plans presented on pages 8 and 9. 

typing rooms. Rooms 156 and 304 have been set aside 
for typing rooms for students, graduate students and faculty 
members. There are eight booths in each of the rooms. 
All patrons who wish may bring their own typewriters for 







GENERAL »EFE»ENCe 




"""" " "E " ' 

6«0. SiNC ROOM R 



POhTlCO 

. . .: 



SECOM0 F L 00' 



use in these roms. However, coin machines are available. 

Reference materials to be copied are signed out to the 
typing rooms and returned to these rooms when the copying is 
completed. 

Both typing rooms have been acoustically treated. 

reserve book room. The Reserve Book Room, located 
on the first floor beyond the elevator, is that area in which 
books are placed for restricted use at the request of the 
faculty. 

The loan term of these books varies according to faculty 
member's request. Exceptions are made only when a faculty 
member sends a request for the exception. 

About 3,000 books are placed on reserve each semester, 
and all books are taken off reserve at the end of each school 
year. 

The room is open during regular library hours except for 
Friday night and Saturday. 

general reference. Reference Services involve the as- 
sisting of students and faculty in locating particular books, 
in finding answers to specific questions, or in acquainting 
persons with the library in general. Instead of one central 
reference desk, there are now six desks — one in each division. 
Staff members familiar with the entire Horary and especially 
with their subject areas are on duty in these divisions. 

The General Reference Division contains publications that 
are not specifically concerned with one or more related sub- 



8 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Central /.nun Desk, Elet tronh flash 

board at top < e titer; fnnutttalK 

tubes and hook elevator lower right 





OCIAL 
lENCE 
«M 555 



JL 



" LI 




BOO* STAC 



TT-X 

FIE °"*-±jrr. 



M 




■ 



THIRO FLOOR PLAN 



jects, such as general periodicals, general encyclopedias, and 
general indexes to books, periodicals, and newspapers. Here 
also are collections of biographical sketches, atlases, micro- 
films (and reading machines), college catalogs, telephone 
directories, and many daily newspapers. The division is also 
headquarters for interlibrary loan service to faculty and 
graduate students. The purpose of the division is to aid 
readers in the use of its collection, as well as in the use of 
the card catalog and bibliography collection, both of which 
are adjacent to the room. It also serves as an information 
point in directing patrons to services and materials in other 
parts of the building. 

bibliography. The bibliographic materials are now shelved 
near the card catalog and are on open shelves. The collec- 
tion is serviced by Technical Services and is available at all 
hours during which the library is open. 

humanities. Humanities collection consists of reference 
materials, current magazines and circulating books in the 
adjacent stacks on English and foreign languages and litera- 
ture, public speaking, philosophy, psychology and religion. 
The reading room also contains the juvenile book collection, 
and a small circulating collection will be added to the read- 
ing room during the semester. 

map room. The map area is located on the Mezzanine 
floor near the General Reference Division and is serviced 
from the Reference Desk. 

The collection includes about 10,000 maps, derived mainly 
from the Army Map Service. Map cases and well-lighted 
map tables will be available. 

MAY-JUNE, 1958 




browsing room. The Browsing Room, which is a part 
of the Humanities Division, contains about 2,000 books 
selected for timeliness and for their value as recreational 
reading. 

The comfortable furniture makes the room an ideal place 
for leisure-time reading, but the room is not intended for 
study. 

An assistant is in the room several hours daily to help 
with book selection; at other times the room is serviced from 
the Humanities reading room. 

social science room. The Social Sciences Division has 
reference books, pamphlets, and current periodicals on 
economics, education, history, law. political sciences, soci- 
ology, and travel. A librarian will aid in the use of these 
materials and will also locate related materials in other areas 
of the library. United States and United Nations documents 
covering such topics as world trade statistics, collecting 
postage stamps, education surveys and reports, and Con- 
gressional reports are available for use in the Social Sciences 
Room. Pamphlets on professions, jobs, and occupations are 
kept in the Occupational File. Rare books and theses are 
available on microcard and microprint. The stall is con- 
tinually selecting material to add to the library collection in 
the social sciences filed. A librarian is on dutj Mondaj 
through Friday 8 a. m. to 4:45 p. m. and Monday through 
Thursday 7 p. m. to 10 p. m. The room is open the same 
hours as the total library. 

(Continued on /></!><• 18) 









Alumni Have a Fine Time at First Annual Spring Reunion 



Nearly two hundred alumni re- 
turned for class reunions and many 
more for the Alumni-Varsity Football 
Game on April 12. Holding the honor 
position and deserving special credit for 
the highest percentage of class mem- 
bers present was the Golden Anniver- 
sary Class of 1908. They were closely 
followed by the Forty-Fifth Reunion 
Group of 1913. Clifton E. Fuller, '96 
was the oldest alumnus present. 

The efforts of E. E. Powell and 
others brought eleven members of the 
'13 class back to the campus which they 
had known as Maryland Agricultural 
College. C M. White, President of 
Republic Steel, flew in from Cleveland, 
Ohio. Others present were: Townshend 
of Mitchellville; Todd, of Dundalk; 
Dearstyne, of Parsonsburg; Henry 
White, of Dickerson; and Willson, of 
Bethesda. From out of state came 
Ames of Arlington. Virginia; Blanke- 
man of Kew Gardens, New York; 
Robinson of Hartford, Connecticut and 
Trimble from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

W. A. S. Somerville and C. A. 
Warthen, President and Secretary of 
the Class of '08, had the good fortune 
to see six members of the class of '08 
on hand. In addition to themselves, 
classmates present included H. C. Byrd, 
President Emeritus of the University; 
Barney Cooper who came from Miami, 
Florida; Urah Long of Selbyville, Dela- 
ware; and Dr. Richard Lee Silvester of 
Washington, D. C. The class received 
messages from Charles W. Sylvester of 
Baltimore and S. M. Lowry of Denton. 
G. G. Becker telephoned to talk with 
his classmates and T. B. Mackall, who 
had expected to attend, found it im- 
possible at the last minute. A summer 
reunion of this class is now being con- 
sidered. 

President Somerville. "Stubby" to his 
classmates and friends, challenged any 
other class to show a similar close-knit, 
continuing organization for a fifty year 
period. During their Senior Year these 
classmates agreed upon and have main- 
tained four objectives. They are 
presented here as both a goal and an in- 
spiration for younger classes: 

( 1 ) Hold the class organization to- 
gether with continuing officers. 

(2) Hold a Class Reunion every five 
years on the University campus. 

(3) Hold a Class Meeting each and 
every year. 

(4) As long as any class member is 
alive the class is to be repre- 

lO 




Three members of the Class of 1933, a 25th reunion group, 
huddle in the lounge of the Student Union. 



sented on Alumni Day at Col- 
lege Park. 

Special focus was placed on the 
reunion classes of 1908 (fifty years), 
1913, 1918, 1923, 1928, 1933 (twenty- 
five years), 1938 and 1943. 

Oldest returning alumnus was Clifton 
E. (Uncle Tippy) Fuller, Class of '96. 
Uncle Tippy reminisced freely about 
the old Maryland Agricultural College. 
He recounted in near perfect detail, 
facts about his 89 schoolmates drawn 
mostly from the nearby communities 
of Riverdale, Lakeland, Hyattsville and 
Laurel; the first "official" football game 
against Episcopal High in Alexandria. 
Virginia: and his fellow-cadets in Com- 
pany C. 

Asked what were the chief benefits 
derived from his experience at the Col- 
lege, Uncle Tippy replied "Penmanship 
and the ability to calculate in a hurry." 
He retired ten years ago as cashier of 
the Railway Express Agency in Cum- 
berland. His knack with figures was 
utilized when he served as a Council- 
man, 1946-48, for the City of Cumber- 
land. 



After registering their attend- 
ance,, meeting old friends and class- 
mates, and touring the new library 
facility, young and old grads dug into 
a sizzling feast of charcol-broiled spring 
chicken with all the fixin's. 

Alumni were guests of the University 
for lacrosse and football contests at 
Byrd Stadium. They watched two hard- 
fought games, played on a cold, muddy 
field. In the lacrosse contest, Maryland 
excellence was evident throughout and 
Washington and Lee was dumped with 
much difficulty. Mont's youngsters over- 
powered the alumni 24-6 (See Joe 
Blair's article in the Sports Section). 

In addition to those mentioned above, 
the following alumni registered for the 
Spring Reunion: 
T. B. Symons, Agriculture '02, College 

Park 
Dr. A. E. Goldstein, Medicine '12. Bal- 
timore 
H. Burton Shipley, Agriculture 14. 

Laurel 
A. V. Williams, Engineering '17, Bal- 
timore 

(Continued on page 12) 

THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 







Alumni line an to get the bird 



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RuV^J 


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'T/u' campus may have changed, hut we haven't! 





Barbequed chicken await hungry alumni 




( offee break. 



Alumni President Joseph Deck man. 
Engineering '31. picks a hone with 



m/: :„ r^..**: u. 



J. Homer Remsberg. Agriculture '18. 

Middletown 
W. Preston Williams. Agriculture '18. 

Washington. D. C. 
Theodore Bissell. Agriculture '20. Col- 
lege Park 
W m. Paul Walker. Agriculture '21. Col- 
lege Park 
Jesse \I. Huffington. Agriculture "22. 

Towson 
Clayton Reynolds, Agriculture '22. Den- 
ton 
J. Herbert Snyder. Agriculture '22 

I nion Bridge 
Mildred S. Jones, Home Economics 22 

Arlington. Virginia 
William W. Kirby. Agriculture '22 

Rockville 
Allen D. .Kemp, Arts & Sciences '23 

Bethesda 
Charles E. White. Arts & Sciences '23 

Hyattsville 
George J. Lucken. B.P.A. '24. Wash- 
ington. D. C. 
George S. Langford. Agriculture '24, 

College Park 
Fred L. Bull. Agriculture '25. College 

Park 
Mrs. Fred L. Bull, Education '26 
Warrington R. Sanders, Engineering '25, 

Washington, D. C. 
William H. Evans. Agriculture '26, Uni- 
versity Park 
W. Gilbert Dent, Jr., Arts & Sciences 

'26, College Park 
William C. Supplee, Agriculture '26, 

Laurel 
Jean H. Bratton. Engineering '26. Hunt- 
ington. New York 
Mary R. Langford. Home Economics 
'26, College Park 
George W. Fogg, Arts & Sciences '26, 

College Park 
Myron B. Stevens, Education '27, 

Bethesda 
Helen R. White, Education '27. Hyatts- 
ville 
Egbert Tingley. B.P.A. '27, Hyattsville 
Perry O. Wilkinson. Education '28, 

Hyattsville 
Norman I. Shoemaker, Arts & Sciences 

'28, Point Pleasant, New Jersey 
E. T. Loane, Engineering '29, Baltimore 
A. B. Hamilton. Agriculture '29, Col- 
lege Park 
Walter P. Plumlcy. Arts & Sciences '29, 

Le Roy. New York 
James H. Walter. Arts & Sciences '29, 

Washington. D. C. 
Robert F. Hcaly, Arts & Sciences and 

Medicine '30. Baltimore 
C. B. Mace. Arts & Sciences '30. Cam- 
bridge 

Joe Dcckman. Engineering '31. College 

Park 
Arthur M. Ahalt. Agriculture '31, Col- 

lege Park 




Ahtmni-Varsity football game. 




George Hendrickson, Arts & Sciences 
'31, Salisbury 

Ralph A. Shure. Arts & Sciences '32, 
Silver Spring 

Howard M. Biggs. Engineering '33, 
Bethesda 

Richard B. Murdoch. Engineering '33, 
Washington. D. C. 

E. P. Shrewsbury, Engineering '33. Up- 
per Marlboro 

Gordon S. Pugh. Arts & Sciences '33, 
Easton 

Harold B. Norwood. Engineering '33. 
Laurel 

Lucy Aileen I.ynham. Education '33. 
Hyattsville 

Jud S. lawless. Engineering '33. Mc- 
Lean. Virginia 

John W. Krasavskas, Arts and Sciences 



The two Reunion Honor Classes. 

'33. Takoma Park 
C. Gilbert Hoffman. Engineering '33. 

Annapolis 
Harry E. Hasslinger. Education '33. 

College Park 
Ruth Gilbert Hayes. Education '33, 

Bryan's Road 
Trice Gravatte. Education '33. Cameron 

Mills Road 
W. T. Fullford, Engineering '33. Balti- 
more 
John M. Duncan. Agriculture '33, Silver 

Spring 
John H. Bowie. Engineering '33. 

Hagerstown 
George O. Weber. Engineering '33. 

College Park 
Howard M. Bixby, Engineering '33, 

Vienna. Virginia 



12 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Alumni present and future. 




Eleven return from the Class of 1913. 




Buffet supper climaxes Reunion day. 



Si urn. m B Bell I ngini ei ; 

Hyattsville 
I lizabeth Bonthron Homi I 

'33, Baltimore 
A. ( i \ .in Reuth, I ngine< 

Baltimore 
S. I . Silber, Arte & Sciences • B 

timore 
( h .1 1 les 1 1 Bei ry, I ngineei ing 

Altadena, ( alifoi nia 
Fred Cutting, I ngineering '34, < ollege 

Park 
Jacob B. Selar, MP. A '34, Silvei Spring 
Virginia < oleman, I ducation '35, Silvei 

Spring 
I racy Coleman, Engineering ,s . Silvei 

Spring 
Winifred K Cutting, Home Economics 

'36, Hyattsville 
H. I. Mitchell. Education '36, Hyatts- 
ville 
Paul S. Mullinix. Agriculture '36, Rich- 
mond. Virginia 
Mrs. R. G. Taylor, Home Economics 

'36, Washington 16, I). C 
Edward M. Minion, Arts & Sciences '36, 

Arlington. Virginia 
William B. Bowie. Arts & Sciences '36, 

Upper Marlboro 
Henry E. Butler, Agriculture '37. Fall- 

ston 
Carolyn Y. Mullinix. Home Economics 

'37. Richmond. Virginia 
Albin O. Kuhn. Agriculture '38, Col- 
lege Park 
David L. Brigham, Arts & Sciences '38, 

Sandy Spring 
Paul M. Galbreath. Agriculture '39, 

College Park 
Howard G. Crist. Agriculture '40, 

Sykesville 
Howard M. Bailey, Agriculture '41, 

Towson 
John E. Lewis. Jr.. B.P.A. '41. Silver 

Spring 
F. Landis Hill, Arts & Sciences '42, 

Sayne, Pennsylvania 
S. D. Wolf. Engineering '42. Chevj 

Chase 
Mrs. Helen Griffin Saum. Education 

'42, Baltimore 
Harry Boswell, B.P.A. '42. Hyattsville 
Bob Rivello. Engineering '43. Silver 

Spring 
C. R. Hayleck. Jr.. Engineering '43. 

Hyattsville 
Lois S. Butler. Home Economics '43. 

Fallston 
C. R. Hayleck, Engineering '43. College 

Park 
Edwin Inglis. Engineering '43. Bethesda 
James B. Saum. Agriculture '44. (hew 

Chase 
Mrs. Lloyd L. Mallonee. Jr.. Arts & 

Sciences '45. Fairplaj 

(Continued on page 21) 



MAY-JUNE, 1958 



13 



University Marks First Far East Commencement 



OCCASION .Far East Division. University of Maryland. Com- 
mencement Exercises and Graduation 
PI u i : Pershing Heights Auditorium 

Ichigaya, Shinjuku-ku 

Tokyo, Japan 
iimi : 3:30 p. m.. Monday. March 24, 1958 




Single block of ice forms a Japanese Torii. 




Recessional led by Dr. Lynn B. Bennion, Associate Director of 
the Far East Division. Immediately following are Gen. Kilter 
(left) and Dean Ehrensberger. Behind them are Gen. White [left) 
and Dr. Elkins. Directly behind Gen. White is Dr. Daly, Directoi 
of the Far East Division. 



Through the eyes and ears of our correspondent, you, 
the reader, are on the scene of the first full-scale American 
degree-granting ceremony held in the Far East. The degree- 
granting institution is the University of Maryland; the recip- 
ients of diplomas are twenty men connected with the United 
States Armed Forces in the Far East. Fourteen of them are 
members of the Army, three are members of the Air Force, 
one is a Marine, one is in the Navy, and one is a civilian at- 
tached to the Armed Forces. Those on active military duty 
range from Specialist First Class (Army) to Colonel (Army 
and Air Force) and Captain (Navy). 

The ceremony is a formal "Cap and Gown" graduation and 
the members of the academic procession enter the hall to the 
strains of "God of Our Fathers" while the entire audience 
stands. It is an impressive processional. In the fore ^re Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University; Dr. Ray O. 
Ehrensberger, Dean of the College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies; General Laurence S. Kuter, Commander-in- 
Chief of the Pacific Air Forces; General I. D. White. Com- 
mander-in-Chief, U. S. Army Pacific; Dr. Mason G. Daly. 
Director of the University's Far East Division; Dr. Lynn 
Bennion, Associate Director of the Division: and Dr. Leslie 
Bundgaard, Assistant Director. 

How did a University graduation complete with appropriate 
ceremony come to happen in Tokyo, Japan, 6,900 miles 
from College Park, Maryland? In August, 1956, the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies established a Far East 
Division of its program with headquarters in Tokyo. The 
division now operates in Japan, Korea. Okinawa, Guam, 
and Taiwan. The men graduating March 24 have undertaken 
courses of instruction in Germany, France, Great Britain, 
Austria, Greenland, Iceland, Okinawa, Korea, and Japan. 
The University of Maryland has been aptly termed as having 
a world-wide campus. 

Following the Processional, Dr. Elkins presents General 
Kuter and General White with honorary Doctor of Military 
Science degrees. Both generals are the principal speakers at 
today's graduation and both have been important figures in 
promoting the University of Maryland program for higher 
learning for servicemen. 

Dr. Mason G. Daly, in extending greetings, reveals that 
he would not be surprised to see an overseas branch of the 
College on the moon someday. Dr. Ehrensberger, in com- 
menting on the space age branch, says "As soon as they 
begin a moon branch of the University, they can begin look- 
ing for a new Dean. I've traveled far enough." 

General White is the first speaker on the program. His 
words, reaching the farthest corner of the hushed auditorium, 
are an inspiration to his many listeners: 

"A graduation ceremony anywhere at any time is an 
exciting and meaningful event. The graduation of mature, 
military men from an institution of such high academic 
standing as the University of Maryland in a ceremony [many] 
miles from College Park, Maryland, is most remarkable. 

"It is remarkable in the first place because it is possible. 
Until a few short years ago, in order to receive your degree, 
it would have been necessary for you to attend classes on 
campus. For most of you this would have been impossible . . . 

". . . Not only is this graduation remarkable because it is 
possible, but because completing college even under the most 
favorable conditions is difficult. It is so arduous that only 
one half of those who begin as freshmen graduate as seniors. 
When normal difficulties are compounded by military duties, 
absence from a formal school, and social distractions, it is 



14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



appropriate that you who have completed college under these 
circumstances be called heroes of the academic battle. How- 
ever, the battle is not over and success in am campaign re- 
quires the skillful employment ol the weapons you have been 
named to use . . . 

". . . Today we are passing into the nuclear age. It is 
probable that the changes in the next few years ma\ Ear 
exceed those of the past decade. To be prepared for these 
changes, we must develop leaders who have an understanding 
of the scientific and technological advances taking place in 
the world but at the same time they must have a broad con- 
cept of the great moral, philosophical, and historical truths 
that govern the advances of civilization . . . 

". . . We will have reached the high plateau of maturity 
when we are willing to see events in their true perspective 
and judge them accordingly, when we are satisfied not to 
rush back and forth between the valley of gloom and the 
peak of enthusiasm, when we have the will to adopt the 
wisest course and the fortitude and perseverance to stick 
with the job until it is done. 

"To you who are graduating and receiving your degrees 
today, my sincere congratulations both personally and in be- 
half of the U. S. Army Pacific for your fortitude and perse- 
verance in reaching this fine level of educational maturity." 




The Waseda University Glee Club. 



Then general kuter mounts the podium as the last 
sound of "Toccato for Band," played by the 5th Air Force 
Concert Band, is fading away. Again the hall is silent as 
General Kuter begins: 

". . . It is a great privilege to be with you on this im- 
portant occasion. That is no empty phrase. The occasion is 
important because it honors those determined members of 
the Armed Services who here mark the completion of 
another important step in the lifelong process of learning . . . 

". . . [The] radical transition which has taken place during 
the course of one military career — this shift of concern from 
the ability of an illiterate to sign his name to the ability of a 
university graduate to research, write and defend an academic 
thesis — this great change accurately reflects the increased in- 
tellectual requirements of our present Armed Forces. It also 
reflects the high evaluation now placed by the military upon 
knowledge. We recognize our great need to know . . . 

". . . demands for knowledge and for wisdom . . . are to- 
day levied on adequate military leaders at all levels by war 
requirements which do not directly involve the use of military 
hardware. These are the intellectual requirements for sur- 
vival today and for victory eventually in the Cold War — 
the bitter, all-encompassing Communist war for the minds and 
hearts of men . . . 



"To survive in the Cold w.n. judgment, knowledge and 
wisdom are urgently needed io survive, we need to kn 

"And today youi new academic degreea are reassui 
evidence ol youi own broader knowledge and youi increased 

ability to serve \oui country." 

In the graduation program ol the I ai I ast, it is appropriate 
that there is found a Choral Number sung by an entirely 

lapanese (dee Club, following denei.il Kilter's speech, the 
Waseda University (dee (Tub. under the directorship ol 

Osamu Aoyagi, becomes the locus ol attention. 

And now nil LONG AWAITED MOMENT. MAJOR ROBER1 
HENRY ALLEN, JR., walks across the platform tO receive his 

Bachelor of Science degree in Military Science I or Majoi 

Allen, this moment has been a lone time m coming H 
began his studies at foil Meade. Maryland, m 1950, and eon 
tinned at education centers in Scullhorpe. I ngland, Balti 
more, and in Japan. He completed his degree requirements 
at Camp Saint Barbara in Korea, where he had the uniqui 
distinction, because of distance and road conditions, ol I 
the only student to commute to class m a light army aircraft 
One by one the\ file across the platform to receive then 
diplomas and a warm handshake from Dr. Elkins: 
major michael ANiiioNY barry, Bachelor of Science in 

Military Science; 
CAPTAIN FRANK MOONEY BENNETT, JR., Bachelor of Science 

in Military Science; 
major michael chessnoe, Bachelor of Science in Military 

Science; 
MAJOR JAMES DOMINk ( I WIO, Bachelor of Science in Mili- 
tary Science; 
CAPTAIN GEORGE DEWEY EGGERS, JR., Bachelor of Science in 

Military Science (in absentia); 

MAJOR ELLIS RAY ATES, Bachelor of Science in Military 
Science (in absentia); 

CAPTAIN FELIX LEE GOODWIN, Bachelor oj Science in Military 
Science; 

MAJOR William franklin GUSS, Bachelor of Science in Mili- 
tary Science; 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL WILLIAM DANIEL KENNEDY, Bachelor of 

Science in Military Science; 
CAPTAIN ARTHUR GEORGE LANGE. JR., Bachelor of Science in 

Military Science (in absentia); 
CAPTAIN WILLIAM ROBERTSON LIPSCOMB, Bachelor of Science 

in Military Science; 
CAPTAIN JOHN EDWARD MCGLOTHl IN, Bachelor of Science in 

Military Science; 
COLONEL PAUL MILLMAN MORRii 1 . Bachelor of Science in 

Military Science; 
MAJOR JAMES RUSSELL MOSES, Bachelor of Science in \fili- 

tary Science; 
major Griffith orme, Bachelor of Science in Military 

Science; 
MAJOR WILFRED G. PEMBERTON, Bachelor of Science in Mili- 
tary Science (in absentia); 
LIEUTENANT COLONEL CLAUDE C. STURGES, JR., Bachelor ol 

Science in Military Science; 
SPECIALIST FIRST CLASS PHIUP ALFRED WHITE, Bachelor of 

Arts in General Studies; 

MR. RAYMOND EDWARD YAGELOWK H. Bachelor ol Arts in 
General Studies. 

The UNIVERSITY FAMILY TAKES PRIDE IN THE ACHIEVEMENT 

of these men who have attained their academic degrees under 
sometimes trying circumstances; those who have gone before 
welcome them into the great and growing alumni fellowship. 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



15 



Introducing the University Regents 



These brief biographical profiles introduce alumni to 

four members of the University's Board of Regents. 

Faithful to the traditions and ideals of our University, 

these men give themselves unreservedly in the 

University's welfare. Four additional profiles will be 

published in the July- August issue: 

three others will appear in the September-October issue. 




MR. ALVIN L. AUBINOE 

Member 

Board of Regents 

The newest member of the board of regents is Mr. 
Alvin L. Aubinoe, native Washingtonian and noted architect 
and builder. Born in Washington, D. C. on February 12, 
1903. Mr. Aubinoe is a 1926 engineering graduate of the 
University. 

Mr. Aubinoe's hobby is following the sports competitions 



of the various University athletic teams. He is one of the 
founders of the Terrapin Club and a Past President of that 
organization. Mr. Aubinoe visited New York recently to 
watch our Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball Champions 
defeat Boston College. 

Concerning his newly-assumed duties on the Board, Mr. 
Aubinoe states: "I am a member of the Building Committee 
of the Board of Regents and. no doubt, will get right into 
the architecture and building of new structures for the Uni- 
versity, which I will certainly be delighted to do." 

Mr. Aubinoe is the architect of the National Radio Insti- 
tute and architect and builder of Home Builders Association 
of Metropolitan Washington. He is President of Alvin L. 
Aubinoe, Inc.; Aubinoe Construction Company; Wildwood 
Investment Corporation; The Allandott, Inc.; the Washington 
and Lee Apartments, Inc.; Parkside Apartments, Inc.; Du- 
pont Plaza, Inc.; Treasurer of Hardware, Inc. and principal 
partner in the architectural firm of Aubinoe, Edwards and 
Berry. 

In addition to the time he will be devoting to the Board 
of Regents, Mr. Aubinoe will continue serving a wide circle 
of civic activities. He is a member of Beta Kappa Chapter of 
Kappa Alpha Fraternity; the Court of Honor, Wood Province, 
Kappa Alpha Order; Treasurer of the Beta Kappa Corpora- 
tion; President of Fraternity Housing Corporation, Kappa 
Alpha Order; Past National President of Alpha Delta Sigma 
Fraternity; Past President of the Home Building Association 
of Metropolitan Washington; Director of the Federal City 

(Continued on page 22) 




MR. B. HERBERT BROWN 

Secretary 
Board of Regents 

IHE SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, MR. B. HERBERT 

brown, has been in educational work for 32 years, 15 of 
them as Vice President and Athletic Director of the University 
of Baltimore where he served from 1926 to 1941. In 1941 he 
resigned from this institution and founded and is now Presi- 
dent of the Baltimore Institute which conducts preparatory, 



business and adult education courses. The Institute is the 
official sponsor in Baltimore and Western Maryland, of the 
Dale Carnegie Course in Effective Speaking and Salesmanship. 

A native Baltimorean, Mr. Brown was graduated from 
Forest Park High School where he was the first president of 
the newly-organized student government organization. He 
earned Bachelor of Business Administration and Bachelor 
of Laws degrees at the University of Baltimore. In May. 
1955, the Steed College of Technology. Johnson City. Ten- 
nessee, conferred an Honorary Doctor of Laws on Mr. Brown 
for his success in and contribution to the field of business 
education. 

Mr. Brown is the founder and Past President of the Dale 
Carnegie Course Sponsors' Association and a former member 
of the Sponsors Advisory Committee of the Dale Carnegie 
Publishers, Inc. He is the Associate Director of the Speed- 
writing Company and has been actively engaged in promulgat- 
ing the many advantages of Speedwriting ABC shorthand. 

The U. S. Army Air Forces awarded a "Certificate of 
Meritorious Service" to Mr. Brown as a result of his success- 
ful work in connection with the Aviation Cadet Procurement 
Program during World War II. He is a former member of 
the Board of Directors of the National Association and Coun- 
cil of Business Schools. In June, 1956, the University of 
Baltimore awarded him a Citation for his achievements in 
educational work. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the Masonic Order, a member 
of the Baltimore Rotary Club, the Country Club of Maryland. 

(Continued on page 22) 



16 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



From office clerk ro presideni of a large company— 

in 24 years — that is the record of Edmund Sidney Burke. As- 
sistant Treasurer for the University's Board of Regents. 

Mr. Burke started in 1911 in the office of Fisk, and his 
rapid rise was interrupted only by his service in the U. S. 
Navy, 1918-1919. In the late 20's he was Assistant to the 
President of Fisk. Then during a period of reorganization in 
the early 193()'s, he was appointed Agent tor the Receivers. 
Following the receivership, when the plant was taken over 
by another financial group, Mr. Burke joined the stall ot 
Walter P. Chrysler. 

In 1934, The Kelly-Springfield Tire Company of Cumber- 
land, Maryland, found itself in serious difficulties, and Mr. 
Burke was invited to become Vice President and General 
Manager to regenerate the company and return it to its place 
among the profit makers. Because of various dissident stock- 
holder groups, the company was thrown into equity receiver- 
ship, which resulted in a transfer to Federal Court for re- 
organization. In 1935, the company was reorganized, and 
Mr. Burke became President. Kelly-Springfield has long since 
regained its former established position as one of the im- 
portant organizations in the tire industry. 

Like many other busy executives, Mr. Burke has found time 
to take an active interest in civic affairs and has been a 
leader in community welfare activities. 

He is Past Potentate of Ali Ghan Shrine; honorary 
Rotarian; Past President of the YMCA, and headed a fund 
raising campaign to pay off the YMCA's long standing debt; 
he served two terms as Cumberland Chamber of Commerce 
President; he also helped organize and served as President for 




MR. EDMUND S. BURK1 

i isistant Treasurer 

Board (if Rcucnts 



Cumberland and Allegany County's first United Fund while 
he spearheaded its initial more-than-successful campaign in 
1957; and has taken an active part in planning and directing 
numerous fund raising projects for needed community im- 
provements. 

(Continued on page 22) 



Edward f. holter, the vice chairman of the board of 
regents, has served on the Board for more than ten years. 
During those years he has observed many changes as the Uni- 
versity has grown and developed. Mr. Holter's association 
with the University began as a member of the first graduating 
class (1921 ) of the newly-named University of Maryland. 

The Vice Chairman relates that the most outstanding single 
event of his student career occurred when he was a senior 
playing first attack on the Maryland lacrosse team. In those 
days the lacrosse team considered itself lucky to win a game 
with one of the Baltimore high schools! Johns Hopkins tradi- 
tionally beat Maryland's team every year. As Mr. Holte; 
recalls: "It happened in the spring season of 1921. We were 
able to hold the Hopkins team to four points while Maryland 
scored a single point. I had the pleasure of seeing my name 
listed in the Baltimore Sun as the player who scored that one 
point. While we did not win the game it was a moral victory 
and it stands out as a highlight of my student career." 

Born in Jefferson, Maryland, June 6, 1900, Mr. Holter is 
the owner and former operator of two large dairy farms in 
Frederick County, Maryland. His home farm at Middletown, 
Maryland, has been in the family for four generations. 
Married in 1924, he has one daughter, who is married, and 
four grandchildren. He has been active in farm and com- 
munity organizations, having served as an officer in various 
units of the National Grange since 1917. He was State 
Grange Secretary for 1 2 years and served eight years as 
Master of the Maryland State Grange. Elected Lecturer of 
National Grange at Columbus, Ohio, in 1947. he has since 




MR. EDWARD F. HOLTER 

I 'ice-Chairman 
Board of Regents 

been re-elected five times to consecutive two-year terms 

In addition to his work for the Grange and for the Board 
of Regents ot which he is Vice Chairman and Chairman ot 
the sub-committee on Agriculture. Mr. Holter is engaged in 
a variety of civic activities. He is Past Commander of Ever- 

(Continued on pagi 23) 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



17 



New Main Library 
(Continued from page 9) 



auditorium. A small, attractive auditorium seating 160 
people is located on the fourth floor between the Fine 
Arts Division and, what is to be in the future, the Audio- 
Visual Center. The auditorium has raised stage, projection 
room and black-out blinds. It is for general University use. 



technology and science room. The purpose of the 
Technology and Science Division is to provide access for 
faculty, students and staff to materials in the pure and applied 
sciences. The area is open the same hours as the library: 
8 a. m. to 10 p. m. Monday thru Friday, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Saturday, 3 p. m. to 10 p. m. Sunday. 

Four hundred current issues of periodicals, 100 reference 
books, pamphlets, and a reference set of agricultural experi- 
ment and extension bulletins are in this reading room. Books, 
bound periodicals and a circulating set of agricultural bulletins 
are in the adjacent stacks. Pamphlet materials are charged 
out from the room; books from the stacks are charged out 
at the loan desk. Reference service is always available; re- 
quests for special service may be left for the librarian when 
she is off duty. 

seminar rooms. Fourteen seminar rooms are located 
throughout the building. Seating capacities range from ten 
to thirty-six. Each room has tables around which a class 
may sit. Priority for the use of these rooms is given to 
seminar classes in which extensive use is made of library 
materials. About 350 people can be accommodated at one 
time in the seminar rooms. 

microfilm room. The library's collection of journals, 
newspapers and books on microfilms, microcards and 
microprints is a rapidly growing collection. The Baltimore 
Sun, New York Times and Washington Post, for example, 
are no longer bound in large, bulky volumes; instead the 
library subscribes to the microfilm editions of these news- 
papers. A special room on the third floor has been 
designated as the Microfilm Room. Here machines for read- 
ing material in any microform are available. Machines are 
also available in certain other areas of the building, such as 
in the Reference Division. 

Maryland and rare books division. The Maryland and 
Rare Books Division contains all types of materials concern- 
ing the State of Maryland and the University. The staff 
attempts to assemble both historical materials and current 
books and publications concerning Maryland and by Mary- 
land authors. A file of clippings .taken from Maryland news- 
papers on subjects relating to the State of Maryland is kept 
in the room. 

Materials in this room are fox restricted loan to faculty 
and graduate students and for use in the room by other 
patrons. These written at the University and a small collec- 
tion of rare books are kept in locked stacks adjacent to the 
room. At present, the room is 'open from 8:30 a. m. to 
4:45 p. m. Monday through Friday. 

Items of historical interest, in the form of letters, pictures, 
books, and all other publications are welcomed as gifts for 
this room. 

fine arts division. The Fine Arts Division contains ma- 
terials in fine art, music, theater and physical education. 
Special materials include an extensive picture file, more than 
500 phonograph recordings and ten listening booths. Loan 
procedure of the division is the same as that of the Loan 
Department. Circulation for the collection is carried on by 
the Fine Arts Division itself and not by the Loan Desk. 

Hours are Monday through Friday, 8:45 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
and Saturday. 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 



P rocedures for securing a book in the new library have 
been speeded up by the use of pneumatic tubes and a book 
lift. This system, it is hoped, will limit the time needed to 
secure a book from three to eight minutes waiting time. 

A student may submit his book request at the Loan Desk as 
formerly on the McBee charge card. This is sent by 
pneumatic tubes to the proper stack area, where a student 
assistant is assigned to find books. When the book is located, 
it is placed on the booklift which carries it to the Loan Desk. 

The student reclaims his book by number. This is assigned 
to him when he requests the book, and he knows when his 
book has been found by watching a flash board above the 
Loan Desk for his number. 

The five levels of book stacks were opened to all students, 
graduates and faculty members on February 10. 

The building was planned to meet the needs of the present 
and the future. A fluorescent lighting system is found gen- 
erally throughout the building, except in the bookstack areas 
where incandescent lighting is used. There exists no need 
for desk lamps for the reason that footcandle ratings through- 
out the building are high. 

Various types of study facilities are available — many indi- 
vidual study tables, conference rooms, carrels, lounge-type 
furniture, faculty studies, and typing booths. The two 
elevators in the building are for the use and comfort of 
faculty and students as well as the library staff: Air-condition- 
ing for the total building has not been installed. The pro- 
cessing area and administrative offices, however, are air- 
conditioned; the two large reading areas on the second floor 
can be air-conditioned with the installation of cooling 
equipment. 

A LL ALUMNI ARE WELCOME TO USE LIBRARY MATERIAL WITH- 

in the library. For alumni living in College Park loan 
privileges are available. Alumni working on special research 
projects may be granted other library privileges. Mail service 
is not possible at the present time. For specific advice 
alumni should contact the Director of Libraries, Professor 
Howard Rovelstad. 

Roster of personnel assigned to major positions are: 

Director of Libraries, prof. Howard rovelstad 
Head, Technical Services, prof. h. david turner 

Catalog Department, miss anna m. carper 

Order Department, prof. h. david turner 
Coordinator of Reference Services, prof, anna mary urban 

General Reference Division, prof, anna mary urban 

Social Sciences Division, miss Virginia Phillips 

Fine Arts Division, MR. Robert B. ross 

Humanities Division, dr. Robert pierson 

Technology & Science Division, 

MISS JOSEPHINE WEDEMEYER 

Maryland & Rare Books Division, MRS. harold hayes 
Head, Loan Department, miss betty b. baehr 

At present in the Main Library Building, the staff includes 
25 professional staff members. All have their Library Science 
degrees, several have Master's degrees in subject fields, and 
two have Ph.D. degrees. Two are members of Phi Beta 
Kappa. 



18 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



News from the Clubs 



By Victor Hoi m, Field Secretary 

Publicity Chairmen should Address Reports 

of Meetings and Activities to Ml Holm, 

Alumni Association, Administration Building, 

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 



BAJ I [MORE CLUB 

The University of Maryland Alumni 
Club of Baltimore will hold its annual 
meeting and election of officers on 
Friday evening, May 23, at the 104th 
Medical Regiment Armory, 505 West 
Fayette Street. 

Mr. Sam L. Silber, president of the 
Baltimore Club, will preside. Reports 
by all Committee Chairmen regarding 
activities of the organization will be 
heard after which the newly elected 
officers will be installed. 

Following the business session the 
club and their guests will enjoy a 
pleasant evening of dancing to the 
music of Mr. Mel Shear and his Jazz 
Band. Refreshments will be served. 

During the past year Mr. Silber had 
as his Committee Chairmen: Mrs. Ethel 
Troy, program; Dr. Eugene L. Pas- 
sagno, membership; Miss Lorraine Neel. 
roster; Mr. Sam Goldstein, arrange- 
ments; Mr. John Lampe, publicity; Mr. 
G. Kenneth Reiblich. Legislative; Dr. 
William H. Triplett. constitution and 
by-laws; and Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, 
student union building. 

Officers of the year 1957-58 assisting 
Mr. Silber were Charles F. Ellinger, 1st 
Vice-President; David W. Bien. 2nd 
Vice-President; Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, 
3rd Vice-President; Dr. B. Olive Cole, 
Secretary; William J. Hucksoll. Treas- 
urer. 

The Club has arranged an outing for 
members and guests aboard the steamer, 
The Latrobe, on Saturday, June 14th. 

The party will board the ice breaker 
at Municipal Pier One, at the foot of 
President Street at 1 P. M. An in- 
teresting afternoon is planned by the 
committee including a complete tour 
of the Baltimore Harbor, an experience 
that Baltimoreans in years gone by were 
able to enjoy frequently, however, this 
opportunity is no longer available as a 
public service. A good attendance is 
anticipated. 

Guests will bring their own picnic 
lunch. There will be music and dancing. 
This outing will conclude the year's 
activities under Mr. Silber's term in 
office. 

GREATER UNIVERSITY FUND 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. General Chair- 
man of the Greater University of 
Maryland Fund, recently gave an in- 
terim progress report and said that a 



total oi $90,000 has been received by 

the University since the alumni giving 
program began in January, 

He noted that the figure represented 

gilts from more than 1,800 alumni and 

friends of the University 

"We are gratified that the (neater 
University of Maryland Fund has 
received such enthusiastic support from 
not only alumni of the University oi 
Maryland, but from University friends 
who are interested in insuring that 
our State institution maintains its 
leadership with other outstanding col- 
leges and universities in this nation," 
Dr. Goldstein declared. 

DR. ELKINS ADDRESSES ALUMNI 

President Elkins has reported on 
the progress being made by the Uni- 
versity in addresses to groups of alumni 
meeting in Pittsburg. Boston. New York 
City, and in Maryland at Easton. Col- 
lege Park, Hagerstown and Baltimore. 

Dr. Elkins summarized the advances 
being made in three areas vital to the 
University's future: students, faculty 
and facilities. 

Upgrading of student performance, 
he explained, is being accomplished 
through a new probation plan, designed 
to assure the steady progress of individ- 
ual students toward a degree within the 
normal four- or five-year period. To 
remain in good standing, a student must 
not fail more than fifty percent of his 
courses in any semester and must 
further attain a cumulative grade point 
average of "C" or better to attain 
junior standing. 

Dr. Elkins also referred to his recent 
convocation address in which the 
faculty was likewise charged to examine 
its teaching effectiveness, department by 
department, to make certain that stu- 
dents were receiving the kind of in- 
struction that would permit develop- 
ment of their maximum capabilities. 

In the area of facilities expansion. Dr. 
Elkins outlined the current building pro- 
grams in Baltimore and College Park. 
"To accommodate the additional thou- 
sands of qualified Maryland youths who 
will seek admission in the years just 
ahead. The University must prepare to 
double its present enrollment by 1975." 
Dr. Elkins explained. "And facilities 
expansion to meet this need is inevit- 
able." A master plan for future ex- 
pansion at College Park is now the sub- 



ject oi ,i study being made by the Board 
ol Regents. In Baltimore, future de 
velopmenl is coordinated w ith long-range 

plans ol the I ib. m Renewal Agency 

Dr. Elkins also pointed out thai il •> 
state university plans to use above the 
average, it must Kmk to private sup 
port tin redevelopment such .is scholai 
ships which help to develop .> quality 
institution. I he I Diversity ol Mary 
land, he added, is undertaking a pro- 
gram to develop this kind ol Bupporl 
and commended the leadership ol 
alumni in this movement. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12, Gen- 
eral Chairman ol the Greater University 
of Maryland Fund, outlined the prog- 
ress of the fund at each meeting. He 
called for the support of all alumni to 
back the program of the University. 

Dr. Elkins spoke to alumni at Easton, 
March 3: Hagerstown. March 4: Col- 
lege Park, March 5; Baltimore. March 
6. 

In April, the President addressed a 
regional meeting of West Virginia. 
Pennsylvania and Ohio alumni. April 
9, in Pittsburgh. The next day he ad- 
dressed members of the New York 
Alumni Club, at the Harvard Club in 
New York City. On April 11, Dr. 
Elkins spoke to alumni of the New 
England area at the University Club. 
Boston. 

Arrangements for the Pittsburgh 
meeting were made by a committee 
headed by Dr. Joseph Finegold. Pitts- 
burgh physician, and including Mr. A. 
B. Fisher, of the Koppers Company; 
Mr. Gordon Kessler. Pittsburgh at- 
torney: and Mr. Charles Furtney, of the 
Jones and Laughlin Steel Company. 

Accompanying the President and Dr. 
Goldstein at the New York meeting 
were Mr. A. E. Cormeny, Assistant 
to the President responsible for Endow- 
ment and Development and Mr. David 
L. Brigham. Director. Office of Alumni 
Relations. Arrangements for this meet- 
ing were made under the direction of 
Club President Hal McCiay. 

Accompanying Dr. Elkins and Dr. 
Goldstein at the Boston meeting was 
Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean, School 
of Dentistry. Arrangements lor this 
meeting were made by Dr. Alphonse 
Stranski. Boston dentist: Dr. Norman 
Wilson. Boston surgeon: and Dr. Joseph 
Carvalho, Fall Ri\er Dentist 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



19 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



Maryland's football fortunes for 
1958 were given an encouraging spring 
preview as Tommy Mont's newest edi- 
tion seemed unawed at the great grad 
roster as the youngsters engineered a 
methodical but thrilling 24-6 victory 
over the Alumni in the eighth annual 
Varsity-Alumni football game in Byrd 
Stadium. 

As is the custom, this game brings 
down the curtain to spring practice for 
the varsity and offers an early glimpse 
of what might be expected of the team 
for the coming season. Too, the pro- 
ceeds of the game go to the M Club 
Scholarship fund which assists minor 
sports. 

No college varsity addresses itself to 
a bigger challenge in playing its alumni. 
Among the 65 grads who returned to 
the scene of their college days and foot- 
ball playing era, there were 28 with 
pro experience and 14 who had made 
all and many all-America teams. It's 
a serious undertaking for the alumni, 
evidenced by the fact that Ron Waller, 
the great halfback with the Los Angeles 
Rams, flew in from the West Coast 
to play in the game. Many others 
motored from their out-of-state resi- 
dence to be with their fellow-grads. It 
is felt in all collegiate football circles, 
that the University of Maryland Alumni 
game is the best. 

The 24-6 win "clued" the Terp op- 
ponents that Mont has a fine team ready 
for the gridiron wars this fall. 

The game, witnessed by 5500 in a 
wet and cold afternoon, saw the ex- 
pected stars come through for Mont 
and a pleasant package emerged from 
the freshman team. Quarterbacks Bob 
Rusevlyan and Dickie Lewis excelled 
and the future signal-callers, sophs this 
year, Dale Betty and Dick Scarbath 
showed well. Fullbacks Jim Joyce and 
Larry Casparro were most impressive 
and of course, the veteran halfbacks 
Ted Kershner and Bob Layman con- 
tinued to pave the way as two of Mary- 
land's finest all-around halfbacks. 

Up front, the work of Mont's two 
lines was most promising. The Terps 
have two of the games' top guards in 
Rodney Brcedlove and Tom Gunder- 
man. Breedlove came up with many 
national honors last year as a soph 
and should be in line for more. He 
will be pushed for honors at the guards 
spot by Gunderman, a truly fine player. 



Mont also seemed assured that he has 
four of the finest tackles he has had 
in co-Captain Fred Cole and Kurt 
Schwarz on the first unit and Ed Nickla 
and Tom Flor on the second unit. 
Many observers singled out Nickla for 
his play against the big boys. At the 
pivot spot, upcoming junior Victor 
Schwartz, moved from last year's guard 
spot, has been most impressive and is 
a sure bet to be a most adequate re- 
placement for the graduating Gene 
Alderton and Wilbur Main. At the 
flanks, the Terps have some of the best 
in Ben Scotti, Ron Shaffer, Al Beardsley, 
and Vincent Scott. 

It was Scott who caught the eye of 
everybody in the stands. The new- 
comer, up from last year's frosh 11, 
looks to be the finest place-kicker Mary- 
land has had in the past decade. He 
gave the fans a kick with his fancy 
footwork. He booted a field goal from 
a difficult angle that carried 28 yards; a 
point after touchdown, and fooled the 
Alums by taking Rusevlyan's lateral 
for a two-pointer after the Varsity's last 
score. He kicked off to the goal line 
or beyond three times, once completely 
past the end zone. And to complete 
a real big day, he caught the only pass 
thrown him and played a stellar defen- 
sive game. He was the brightest of the 
boys coming up that will help a great 
deal in '58. 

After viewing the films of the game, 
Mont expressed satisfaction, but said 
cautiously, "I hope the fine nucleus 
shown in the game comes through as 
courageously in the classroom." 

And the latest academic report 
indicates that Mont might have a 
chance of working with this group 
intact when early fall practice begins, 
September 1 . 

Basketball at the University of Mary- 
land reached its greatest height during 
the 1957-58 season. Following the 
second best regular season record in 
Terp history (17-6) Bud Millikan's 
exciting five went to the nation's 
strongest post-season tournament, the 
Atlantic Coast Conference playoffs, and 
came through winning the championship 
with three consecutive great victories 
over Virginia, Duke, and North Caro- 
lina, the latter defending ACC and Na- 
tional Champions. This was the first 
Maryland had won a Conference Title 
since 1931. and then it was the Old 



Southern Conference. In the title game 
the Red and White, led by all-tourna- 
ment selections Nick Davis and Charles 
McNeil, drubbed Frank McGuire's 
team, 86-74. Davis and McNeil were 
the darlings of the tournament. Both 
received long standing ovations when 
they left the Championship game near 
the end. 

Maryland, which finished sixth in all 
three national polls (Associated Press, 
United Press, and International News 
Service), then moved on to New York 
and Madison Square Garden to meet 
Boston College in the first round of the 
NCAA Tourney. The fever that hit the 
Terp fans reached its highest pitch as 
an estimated 1500 followers traveled to 
New York to watch the Terps play 
their first game in the Gardens. The 
game also marked the first time a Mary- 
land team had been in the NCAA play- 
offs. It was "Slick Nick" Davis and the 
great playmaker and hustling guard 
Tom Young that sparked the Terrapins' 
rout, 86-63. McNeil and big Al Bunge 
did an outstanding job on the boards 
for the Millikanmen. 

Then it was on to Charlotte, N. C. 
and the NCAA Eastern Regionals. The 
Terps drew the toughest assignment in 
Temple, the nation's fifth ranked five. 
The game was as billed, a great thriller 
between the fifth and sixth ranked 
teams in the nation. After a fabulous 
rally in the last five minutes that 
brought them from 1 1 points down to a 
one point deficit with 26 seconds to 
play, this great Maryland team bowed 
out, 71-67. The Terps had the ball 
with these seconds remaining, but 
couldn't get the shot off as the Owls, 
led by their great all-America Guy 
Rogers, retrieved the ball and went on 
to score a foul and a field goal at the 
final whistle. 

In the consolations for third place, 
the Terps beat Manhattan, the team 
that had beat West Virginia in the 
Gardens. 

For their fine work in this tourna- 
ment, Davis won first team all-tourney 
honors and McNeil, second team. 

To Millikan and Maryland, the year 
was a great success and a greater tribute 
to the team and its coach. 

As for next year, it is thought that 
it can be just as exciting and the re- 
sults will be just as satisfying. 



20 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



First Annual Spring Reunion 

Continued from page 13 



Arts & Science's 



Education '47, 



Sea- 
'50, 
'50, 



Mrs. Jane R. Saylor, 
'44 Chevy Chase 
Ruth K. Townshend, 
Mitchcllville 

Mrs. Sylvia G. Cary. Arts & Sciences 
'47, Hyattsville 

Ruth Jones Eshleman. Home Eco- 
nomics '48, College Park 

J. A. Pavesich, B.P.A. '48. I owson 

S. H. Mortimer. Jr.. Engineering '48, 
Baltimore 

Harry L. Jones, Agriculture '49, Street 

John L. Crothers. Jr., Agriculture '49, 
Hyattsville 

John D. Ewler, Engineering '49, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

J. W. Candan, Education '50, Ellicott 
City 

Elbert W. Tall. Agriculture '50, 
brook 

George L. Peabody, Education 
Winchester, Virginia 

Roger E. Fogle, Arts & Sciences 
Owings Mills 

Mrs. Louis S. Hayert. Education '50. 
College Park 

H. C. Donofrio, Physical Education '51, 
Towson 

Gordon Beard, B.P.A. '51, Baltimore 

R. J. Wieland, Education '51, Takoma 
Park 

Daniel T. Staffuri, Education '51, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania 

Harry F. Davies, Jr., Arts & Sciences 
'51, Upper Marlboro 

David B. Lloyd, B.P.A. '51, Bethesda 

William A. Vogel, Engineering '51, 
Washington, D. C. 

Marion M. Huff, Jr., B.P.A. '51, Hyatts- 
ville 

Mr. & Mrs. G. D. Rawlings, Arts & 
Sciences '51, Education '52, An- 
napolis 

Julio Gonzalez, B.P.A. '51. Baltimore 

Dudley D. Taylor, Engineering '51, Col- 
lege Park 

Robert H. Treuchel, B.P.A. '51, Balti- 
more 

Harry W. Eumont, Jr., Engineering '52, 
Merchantville, New Jersey 

Paul H. Hartman, Education '52, Bal- 
timore 

V. R. Beam, Arts & Sciences '52, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey 

Frank M. Clagett, Arts & Sciences '52, 
Upper Marlboro 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Dorn, Home 
Economics and Agriculture '53, Wil- 
mington, Delaware 



Paul Golovato, I ogineering '53, Silver 

Spring 
James I Shaver, MUitarj Science '53, 

Bradshau 

Richard I'. Douglas. Education '54. 

Ellicott City 
Wilfred Von Mayr, Arts & Sciences '54. 
Baltimore 

John J. Seibert, Agriculture '54, 
1 eonardtown 

Craig B. l-isher. Arts & Sciences '54, 

White Plains. New York 
Patricia J. Kuhn, Home Economics '55, 
Kensington 

Winfield W. Dudley, B.P.A. '55, Silver 
Spring 

Joseph Burkett, Engineering '55, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Reyburn E. Browning, Agriculture '55, 
Mt. Airy 

Sue Stinson Lake, Physical Education 
'55, Norristown, Pennsylvania 

Lala & Jim Garritty, B.P.A. and Edu- 
cation '55, 

Wesley I. Sauter, Jr., Education '55, 
Bethesda 

Donald R. Peacock, Arts & Sciences, 
Baltimore 

Carl Schoening, Agriculture '55. Tako- 
ma Park 

H. Andrew Thebo. Jr., B.P.A. '55, 
Washington, D. C. 

Lee P. McMindes, B.P.A. '55. Reading. 
Pennsylvania 

Clarence B. Gragg, Military Science '56. 
MacDill Air Force Base, Florida 

William S. Solomon, B.P.A. '56, Miami, 
Florida 

Donald C. Davis, Arts & Sciences '56, 
Baltimore 

Neil M. Goldberg, Arts & Sciences '56, 
Baltimore 

Captain Ralph Godwin. Military Science 
'57, Ohio 

Jerry D. Hicks, Education '57, Jessup 

Lamont Cranston, Military Science '57, 
Camp Gordon, Georgia 

James M. Dean, Arts & Sciences '57, 
Baltimore 

Captain Dona R. Harbison, Military 
Science '57, Arlington, Virginia 

Lawrence Selwyn, Education '57, Col- 
lege Park 

Alfred Wharton, Arts & Sciences '57, 
Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Morton Greenberg, Education '57, 
Rockspring Road 

Mike P. Patchan, Jr.. Education '57. 
Landover Hills 

James C. Russell, Arts & Sciences, 
Woodstock, Virginia 

Walter L. Blanchard, Arts & Sciences 
'57, Baltimore 

Richard Ware, Engineering '58, Hyatts- 
ville 

Victor Holm, Arts & Sciences '57, 
Takoma Park 



Campus Notes 
( ontinued ham /', 



In lune 1957, the facult) ol the 

School Ol Medicine established a lec- 
tureship to honoi Dr. Maurice ( Pin- 
coffs in commemoration ol his thirty- 
five \cars as Prolessor ol Medicine and 
Preventive Medicine. Funds contrib- 
uted by faculty members, colleagues, 
friends and former patients made this 
lectureship possible. I he School uas 
proud to announce this annual lecture 
as a fitting testimonial of Dr. Pincoffs 
eminent career as a physician, teacher, 
investigator, counselor and medical 
administrator. 

FORTY SCHOLARSHIPS AVAII AMI I 
1 OK 1 IKST FAMILY FINANCE WORKSHOP 

The University of Maryland will offer 
40 scholarships to the first annual 
Family Finance Workshop to be held at 
College Park, June 23 to August I. 

The scholarships will be available to 
high school and college teachers and 
administrators in Maryland. Delaware. 
West Virginia. Southern Pennsylvania 
and the District of Columbia. 

A curriculum has been developed to 
give participants an opportunity to 
understand important concepts relating 
to family financial security, to obtain 
skills needed to improve and expand 
programs of education in family finance. 
and to provide materials which may 
be used in solving their own instruc- 
tional problems. 

The teaching staff will be comprised 
of faculty members of the Colleges of 
Education, Business and Public Admin- 
istration and Home Economics. 

One of 15 such programs to be of- 
fered by universities during the summer 
in cooperation with the National Com- 
mittee for Education in Family Finance, 
the University of Maryland workshop 
will offer lectures and discussions in 
personal income, budgeting, banking, 
consumer credit and installment buying, 
renting and buying a home, insurance, 
social security, savings and investments, 
personal taxes, and wills and estates 
Credit toward a graduate degree will 
be awarded upon successful comple- 
tion of the course. 

Scholarship applications and detailed 
information may be obtained by writ- 
ing Dr. Arthur S. Patrick. Chairman. 
Local Advisory Committee on Educa- 
tion, Department of Office Manage- 
ment and Business Education. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park. 
Maryland. 

(Continued on next page) 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



21 



GOV. MCKELDIN, DR. ELKINS 
APPOINTED TO SREB POSTS 

Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin of Mary- 
land has been appointed to the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Southern Region- 
al Education Board by SREB Chair- 
man Luther H. Hodges, Governor of 
North Carolina. 

Governor Hodges also appointed Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins to the new Educa- 
tional Plans and Policies Advisory 
Committee of SREB. 

The plans and policies group was 
authorized at the 1957 Board meeting. 
Its purpose is to advise the SREB Di- 
rector on major plans and policies in 
connection with the regional education 
programs of SREB. 

Both Governor McKeldin and Presi- 
dent Elkins are members of the SREB. 
Other members of the Board from 
Maryland are State Senator Layman J. 
Redden of Denton, Miss May Russell. 
President of St. Mary's Seminary 
Junior College, and Dr. Martin D. 
Jenkins, President of Morgan State 
College. 



The University Regents 
Continued from Pages 16 and 17 



ALVIN L. AUB1NOE 

Council; Director of National Metro- 
politan Bank of Washington; member of 
the Board of Trustees of the United 



Community Services of Washington; 
and Director, Washington Board of 
Trade. He is a recent Presidential ap- 
pointee to the Civil War Centennial 
Commission and a member of the 
Drafting Committee of D. C. Housing 
Code. 

In addition to civic and business 
activities, Mr. Aubinoe devotes a con- 
siderable part of his time in working 
for his church. He is a member of 
Bethesda Presbyterian Church where he 
serves as Trustee and President of Board 
of Deacons. 

Mr. Aubinoe*s operations have ex- 
tended as far away as Leopoldville, 
the capital of the Belgian Congo. There 
he helped construct a luxury apartment 
building for the Belgian government, 
intended to attract mining and indus- 
trialists to the area. Mr. Aubinoe's firm 
planned the project and supplied a 
supervisory construction crew. 

The newest member of the Board of 
Regents began his career as an engineer 
with the Rust Engineering Company. 
At REC, he worked on the Dam Filtra- 
tion and Water Works at Patton. Penn- 
sylvania. He was employed as an en- 
gineer in the Ford Assembly Plant in 
Norfolk, Virginia, and then returned to 
Washington to take a position as en- 
gineer for the Washington Railway and 
Electric Company. Later he joined the 
firm of Cafritz Construction Company 
as Architect and Manager of Construc- 
tion. He was employed by this firm 
until 1938 when he established his 
present business. 



B. HERBERT BROWN 

and the Baltimore Association of Com- 
merce. 

Because of his experience and interest 
in education, the Board's Secretary and 
Athletic Committee Chairman states 
that he thoroughly enjoys his service as 
a member of the Board of Regents. He 
relates the following as his outstanding 
experience as a member: "I believe that 
the most startling experience I have had 
as a member of the Board happened 
when Dr. H. C. Byrd announced his 
intention to resign. It seemed to me 
that Curly and the University of Mary- 
land were synonymous, that his roots 
were so deep in College Park that 
nothing would pull him away. 

"A most pleasant realization occurred 
when it became obvious that President 
Wilson H. Elkins would give the Uni- 
versity dependable academic leadership 
and also favor strong varsity athletic 
teams." 

In regard to his recent contributions 
as a member of the Board, Mr. Brown 
explains: "I am glad for the part I 
played in helping the Golf Course and 
the Office of Endowment and Develop- 
ment get under way. I know that 
these two functions will help the stu- 
dents and faculty of the University of 
Maryland for many years to come." 



EDMUND SIDNEY BURKE 

His real hobby is his Connecticut 
farm where he raises pedigreed cattle 




22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



and has developed into a full-fledged 

dairy farmer — in absentia. 

We quote the following as Mr. 

Burke's most vivid memory of the 

campus: 

"The drama unfolded in Byrd Stadi- 
um October 19, 1957 as the bruised. 
but unbowed Maryland Terrapins 
spotted the rugged North Carolina 
Tarheels seven points and then swept 
back in the second half to a 21-7 
victory, stands out more vividlj 
among my experiences as a member 
of the University of Maryland Board 
of Regents. Watching protocol 
shredded as the enthusiastic team 
presented their deserving coach. 
Tommy Mont, to Queen Elizabeth 
and Prince Philip before 43,000 roar- 
ing fans only heightened that drama." 

About his Connecticut farm. Mr. Burke 

says: 

"The brief periods I can spend away 
from the challenges of today's auto- 
mobile and truck tire market are 
usually spent with my wife at our 
farm near Woodbury, Connecticut. 
There, over a hundred purebred dairy 
cattle produce over 250,000 quarts of 
milk annually. In spite of its modern 
conveniences, the farm is far from 
a push button existence. Although 
the personal hobby of my farm may 
sound otherwise, I am not, I assure 
you, like the man who left a farm, 
then worked hard all of his life for 
the privilege of returning to a farm." 

EDWARD F. HOLTER 
hart Post No. 51 of the American 
Legion, and Past President of the Mid- 
dletown Lions Club. He served two 
years (until resignation July 1, 1957) 
as an elected member of the Board of 
County Commissioners of Frederick 
County. He has served on several com- 
mittees, boards and commissions at the 
state level in Maryland as a representa- 
tive of agriculture. He is a Director 
of the Board of CARE; a member of 
"The United States National Commis- 
sion for UNESCO"; Vice Chairman of 
the Farm Conference of the National 
Safety Council; and President of 
Farmers and World Affairs, Inc. 

Concerning his affiliation with the 
University's Board of Regents, Mr. 
Holter states "The opportunity to know 
and work with the very high caliber 
individuals who have served on the 
Board of Regents during this period is, 
in itself, a wonderful experience. 

"I think the most satisfying thing, to 
me personally, is seeing the scholastic 
standing of the University raised to 
higher standards under the very able 
administration of Dr. Wilson H. Elkins." 




18 Plain Corinthian Schwerd Wood Columns 
(36 inches in diameter by 28 feet 5 inches 
in length) grace the entrance to the new 
Library at the University of Maryland. 

Architects specify 

Schwerd 

Qualify WOOD COLUMNS 

with Complete Confidence 

A. F. SCHWERD Mfg. Co. 

Wood Column Specialists 

3215 McClure Ave. Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

POplar 6-6322 



ARTIFICIAL MARBLE 
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FOR INTERIOR 



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Telephone NAtional 8-7413 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



23 




" ^ WT 
>5< Very Impressive Potion 



Tired of ordinary soups 
...try 

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from the 

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Soup Shelf ~~~? 



Cock j Lee kit 
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Bean Soup 

•ilk Sherry 






Cream of Onion 

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w 

Cream* Shrimp 

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At your grocer's now, or write for 
name of nearest dealer to: Crosse 
& Blackwell, Baltimore 24, Md. 




University Book Store 

Specializing In 
Medical Books 

World-Wide Mail Order Service 

118 S. Eutaw Street 

LE 9-4315 

Baltimore, Md. 



Look for the Sign 



MARIA'S 



Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 



Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. 
300 Albemarle St. 
Baltimore 2. Md. 



Closed Mondays 
MU 5-281 1 
MU 5-2812 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 



A. B. Hamilton 



SPACE FOR AGRICULTURE? 

Livestock faculty members, students 
and producers in the State have dreams 
of a new animal industry building on 
the campus. Representative Richard E. 
Lankford of Maryland has introduced 
a bill in the Federal Congress to return 
the 14 acres of Federal owned land to 
the University of Maryland. 

The bill would return the land and 
also allow the purchase of the buildings 
now occupying it. The buildings are 
known as the Bureau of Mines and 
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. Legis- 
lation has been started in Maryland to 
appropriate $1,045,000 to purchase the 
buildings for use by the College of 
Agriculture. 

POULTRY SPECIALIST 

Dr. Richard D. Creek of Purdue Uni- 
versity, Indiana, has been appointed to 
the staff of our Poultry Department as 
Assistant Professor in Poultry Nutrition. 
He succeeds Dr. G. L. Romoser who 
has joined the Monsebte Chemical 
Company in St. Louis, Missouri. 

DEAN HUFFMAN 

Dr. Roy E. Huffman has been ap- 
pointed Dean of Agriculture at Mon- 
tana State University. Huffman re- 
ceived his Master of Science degree 
from the University of Maryland, De- 
partment of Agricultural Economics in 
1939. During the past three years he 
has been Head of the Department of 
Agricultural Economics at Montana. 
He takes the place of Dean M. M. 
Kelso who retired. 

KISSINGER MAKES GOOD 

When a dean compliments another 
school for sending them a good student 
it is news. A letter from Dean Smith 
of the University of California School 
of Public Health complimented our 
Department of Entomology for sending 
them Dr. David Kissinger (M.S. '55 and 
Ph.D '57). The good Dean said, "We 
congratulate you on having such an 
able colleague, and we consider our- 
selves fortunate in being privileged to 
have him in our academic family this 
year." 

FUTURE FOOD NEEDS 

Agronomists of the future face a real 
challenge in developing new crop and 



24 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



soil practices to moot the demand foi 
more food from about the same number 
of acres that are being cultivated now, 
according to Dr. Robert E. Wagner. 
Head of the Agronomy Department. 

He pointed out the important role 
that agronomy must play in the years 
ahead as he spoke before the opening 
session of an agronomy short course 
held at the University. The three-da) 
course was held lor professional agri- 
cultural workers such as county agents, 
fertilizer and seed dealers and salesmen 
and soil conservationists to bring them 
up to date on new developments and 
to give them a review of agronomic 
principles. 

It has been widely predicted. Dr. 
Wagner noted, that requirements for 
agricultural products in 1975 will be 
about one-third higher than current 
levels of production. 

TO CORNELL 

Some people are like birds; they migrate 
north. At least two more have gone to 
Cornell for graduate study: Conrad 
Liden is majoring in Extension Edu- 
cation under the Ford Foundation pro- 
gram; and Phil Kearney is in agronomy. 
Both are working on doctorates. 

EL RANCHO 

Donald Colbeck, '47, has purchased a 
ranch of over 4,000 acres near Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil; he and his wife are now 
developing a herd of 1,500 beef cattle. 

CANAL ZONE TEACHER 

George E. Villalobos, '47, is teaching 
at the University of Panama, Canal 
Zone. 

LONG COUNTY AGENT 

Joseph C. Long, '29, has been appointed 
Agricultural Agent for Island County, 
Coupeville, Washington. 

NEW YORK BANKER 

Dr. Norman Urquhart, M. S. '37, in 
Agricultural Economics, has been ap- 
pointed Associate Economist at the 
First National City Bank of New York, 
where he has been for the past six 
years. 

SHIGETA FROM HAWAII 

James Shigeta, '50, from Hawaii, is 
doing graduate work at the University 
of Wisconsin. Following graduation 
he served as County Agent, and then as 
Assistant 4-H Club Leader for Hawaii. 
Recently he has been in charge of the 
training of Agricultural technicians from 
the Far East who were on their way to 
study in the United States. 

(Continued on next page) 



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HARRY JAMES CONTRACTOR 

Harry Lee James, Agricultural Educa- 
tion '49, is a field engineer for Mc- 
Lean Contracting Company of Balti- 
more. He married the former Nancy 
Righter of Baltimore and lives at Street, 
Maryland. 

WALLACE OHIO AGENT 

Marion Wallace. '29, is Agricultural 
Agent for Montgomery County, Ohio 
and is located in the Commercial Build- 
ing, 44 S. Ludlow St., Dayton, Ohio. 

SKIN YOU LOVE TO TOUCH 

Because there is considerable contro- 
versy in the broiler industry over skin 
color in birds, the Poultry and Agricul- 
ture Economics Departments here at 
the University of Maryland conducted 
a survey in Baltimore stores to get con- 
sumers' reactions. 

Birds were artificially colored with a 
vegetable dye, with colors ranging 
from white to deep yellow. The pig- 
ment used made it impossible to discern 
whether the birds were artificially or 
naturally colored. As customers came 
into the stores they were polled as to 
their preference in broiler skin color, 
and they were also asked what factor 
they associated with skin color. A total 
of 850 persons were polled. 

The white and deep yellow colors 
both rated higher than the in-between 
colors. With birds numbered one 
(white) to four (yellow) on the basis of 
color, 27.1 percent of the consumers 
preferred No. 1 birds, 19.4 percent pre- 
ferred No. 2 birds, 16.7 percent pre- 
ferred No. 3 birds and 36.8 percent 
preferred No. 4 birds. 

It's doubtful if broiler producers can 
affect retail sales volume by controlling 
the skin color of birds, because some 
consumers prefer white skins while 
others prefer yellow skins — and normal 
variations in skin color apparently gives 
the consumer an opportunity to buy 
what he prefers. 

STALEY FARM AGENT 

Joseph L. Staley, '35, Agricultural 
Economics, has been moved up from 
Associate County Agent in Wayne 
County, Pennsylvania to County Agent 
in Pike County. 

Native of Knoxville, Maryland, he 
prepared for college at Brunswick High 
School. Following graduation from the 
University of Maryland he did sales 
work for the American Agricultural 
Chemical Company for over five years 
and then moved into the Extension 
Service in Pennsylvania. 

Staley has been active in all phases 
of extension work and twice was chair- 




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26 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






man of the Northeast Regional 4-H 
Dairy Show at Tunkhannock. In an- 
nouncing his appointment as Count) 
Agent, Dr. H. R. Albrecht, Extension 
Director said, "We wanted a man who 
could continue the good work done by 
the Extension Service in Pike Count) 
and Staley can do the job". 

GO WUST 

There must be a strong attraction to 
the West Coast as three of our faculty 
members are forming a caravan to take 
their families and technical talents to 
Oregon State Agricultural College. 
Corvallis. 

Dr. Edgar A. Day will be Associate 
Professor of Dairying. Dr. Charles W. 
Griffin is transferring to the Depart- 
ment of Bacteriology, and Andrew A. 
Duncan will be Extension Vegetable 
Specialist, at Oregon State. 

ALLARD JOINS ARS 

Howard F. Allard with 17 years ex- 
perience in overseas agricultural work 
and most recently with ICA in Tinga 
Maria, Peru, has joined the ARS Office 
of International Relations to assist with 
the development of horticultural and 
agronomy programs for foreign nations. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Lpis Eld Ernest 



RETIRES FROM DUPONT 

Richard C. Williams, '14, for many 
years national automotive sales manager 
of the DuPont Company's Fabrics and 
Finishes Department, retired January 
31 after a career of more than 40 years 
with the company. His career with 
DuPont began in 1917 when he joined 
the company as a chemist at the Ex- 
perimental Station in Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. 

He was guest of honor at a dinner 
given at Wilmington Country Club by 
his friends and associates in the Fabrics 
and Finishes Department. 

HEADS REPUBLIC SUPPLY COMPANY 

Mr. W. J. McWilliams, '38, was 
recently promoted to the position of 
President of Republic Supply Company. 
The company is a major supplier to 
the oil, gas, chemical and mining in- 
dustries covering a ten-state area in the 
(Continued on next page) 



Pause. .-have a Coke 



Tee off refreshed 




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Washington Coca-Cola Bottling Co 



Colte" if a rcgiltertd Iradc-mari 
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY* 



Silver Spring, Md. 



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MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 




OXYGEN COMPANY 

COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & INHALATION THERAPY 
GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUCITATION EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 
2900 - 52nd Street — Bladensburg, Md. — UNion 4-2345 



73" 



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Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 
3125 V STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

LA 6-8234 



TOWER 9-6204 ■ 

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Trading as 

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A Complete Line of Beverages 

8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



MAY-JUNE, 1958 



27 



These Children will 
be at Maryland one 
day— 




thanks to 
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at FIRST FEDERAL 
where it pays to save. 

District 7-2370 

ElBSTTIpERAL 

iiv Washington 

610 13th STREET, N.W. (Bet. F & G) 
Washington 5, D. C. 



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BETHESDA BRANCH OFFICE 

8216 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half Sf. S. E. 
Washington, D. C. 
Virginia Phone 

and South Lincoln 3-8151 



Northwest 
and Suburban 



Phone 
LOckwood 5-3556 



OFFICES: 
THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, MARYLAND 



Subscribe to 
MARYLAND 
MAGAZINE 



mid-continent region of the United 
States. It operates through 45 store 
points and 10 sales offices. 

Mr. McWilliams was born in Indian 
Head. Maryland. He entered the serv- 
ice in 1941 as a Second Lieutenant 
and was discharged in 1946 as a 
Lieutenant Colonel. After World War 
II. Mr. McWilliams served a short 
while as Assistant to the President of 
the University. 

In 1953-54 he attended the National 
War College, after which he was as- 
signed as Special Assistant to the As- 
sistant Secretary for Economic Affairs 
in the Department of State. 

Mr. McWilliams left government 
service late in 1954 and accepted an 
appointment as Corporate Secretary and 
Assistant to the President of Republic 
Supply Company. He was elevated to 
Vice President in charge of Operations 
and Sales in 1956. 

ACTIVITIES IN THE DEPARTMENT OF 

MUSIC 

The University Opera Workshop, a 
joint venture of the Music and Speech 
Departments, presented its first per- 
formance in January of this year. Hard 
work on the part of the group produced 
a remarkably successful evening of 
chamber opera. The two works, Tele- 
mann's "II Pimpinone" and Milhaud's 
"The Poor Sailor," were performed 
with a great deal of style and under- 
standing. The performers were re- 
warded with critical acclaim by both 
local and national critics. 

The Department is humming with 
the usual second semester rush. Num- 
erous concerts, recitals and programs 
are in preparation involving practically 
every organization and individual in 
the Department. 

The All Maryland Band, Orchestra 
and Choral Days, during March and 
April, will bring thousands of students 
to the campus from the junior high and 
high school level. These performances 
offer the students an opportunity to dis- 
play the results of their work in the 
various school activities. 

The large number of students who 
appeared for the tryouts for the Spring 
Musical was most gratifying and also 
very encouraging. The show chosen 
lor presentation this year is the ever- 
popular "Oklahoma!" Only with the 
continued interest and enthusiasm of 
the student body can such a produc- 
tion be successful. 

On Sunday. February 23, Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinfonia, the largest professional 
musicians fraternity in America, initi- 
ated a chapter at the University. It is 
a pleasure to welcome Sinfonia to the 



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ASPHALT SHINGLES AND ROLL ROOFING, 
COPPER AND RE-ENFORCED PAPER, BUILDING 
PAPERS, POLYETHYLENE FILM 

Supradur Corp. of New York 

ASBESTOS ROOFING AND SIDING 

Red Cedar Sidewalls Ltd. 

WOOD SHAKES AND SHINGLES 

Marshall Stamping Co. 

DOWNSPOUTS AND GUTTERS, AREAWALLS 
LINTELS AND PULL DOWN STAIRWAYS 

Penn Metal Company 

METAL LATH AND ACCESSORIES 
METAL PARTITION SYSTEMS 

Special Sections, Inc. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CHANNEL IRON 
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REGULAR AND AUTOCLAVED FINISH LINE 

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28 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



campus, to congratulate the new mem- 
bers and to wish them success in their 
fraternal future. 

The amount of interest shown in the 
Choral Workshop to be presented al 
the University this summer by Margaret 
Hillis indicates that this may be one of 
the most exciting things to happen in 
this area for some time. 

Hugh Henderson, Director of the 
University Band, will be an adjudicator 
of the finals division of the 37th An- 
nual North Carolina State Music Con- 
test in Greensboro. North Carolina 
April 15 and 18; and Rose Marie Grent- 
zer will be off to the MENC Conven- 
tion to be held in Los Angeles in 
March. 

PARTICIPATE IN SYMPOSIUM 

Dr. Michael J. Pelczar. Jr., Professor 
of Microbiology, participated in a sym- 
posium at the 58th General Meeting of 
the Society of American Bacteriolo- 
gists held April 27-May 1. 1958 in 
Chicago. Illinois. The subject of the 
symposium was "Phenolics as Antimi- 
crobial Agents." Dr. Pelczar and Mr. 
Charles W. Griffin, Graduate Assistant 
in the Department of Microbiology, 
presented a paper at this meeting on 
"survival of microorganisms when dis- 
persed as aerosols." 

Dr. Raymond N. Doetsch, Associate 
Professor of Microbiology, and Mr. 
Ronald J. Gibbons, Graduate Assistant 
in the Department of Microbiology, 
presented a paper at the Chicago meet- 
ing titled "obligately anaerobic urea- 
hydrolyzing bacteria in the bovine 
rumen." 

DR. GORDON REPLACES DR. WARREN 

Dr. Francis B. Gordon. Head of the 
Division of Virology, Naval Medical 
Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, 
will replace Dr. Joel Warren as Visit- 
ing Professor in the Department of 
Microbiology. Dr. Gordon received his 
B.S. degree at Illinois Wesleyan, 1927; 
Ph.D., Chicago, 1936; M.D., 1937. In- 
structor of Bacteriology, Chicago, 1936- 
39; Assistant Professor, 1939-43; As- 
sociate Professor, 1943-47; Professor, 
1947-48. Division chief biolabs., 
Chemical Corps, Camp Detrick. 1948- 
54. Head, Division of Virology, Naval 
Medical Research Center, 1954. Rocke- 
feller Foundation fellow, National In- 
stitute of Medical Research, London, 
1938-39; lecturer, Maryland, 1951, 
1953; special lecturer, George Washing- 
ton, 1951. Managing editor "Journal 
of Infectious Diseases," 1941-48; advi- 
sory editor, 1948; member Microbiol, 
panel. Office of Naval Research, 1951; 
(Continued on next page) 



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EDWARDO ROY, his violin, and 

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till closing. 

COLONIAL WAGONS DINNER 

$3.85, 6 to 10, Monday thru 

Saturday. 

Blue Room 

Brings you its Parade of fam- 
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from 8:15 to 12:45. Tuesday 
thru Saturday. 

Dining from 7. 

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29 




STANDARD 
ENGINEERING CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and Contractors 

FEderal 7-1343 

2129 EYE STREET. NORTHWEST 
WASHINGTON 7, D.C. 



Massers Motel 8c Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 

OTEL 

OPEN ALL YEAR 
FINE DINING ROOM 
AIR-CONDITIONED 

• On U.S. Route 40 — 2 Miles West of Frederick, Md. 




JZcued and <Be^uuce 
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Hay • Straw - Tractors - Combines - Farm Implements 

Serving Frederick County Since 1935 



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OFFICE PHONE TA 2-3113 

RESIDENCE TA 2-3043 

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Consultant, Secretary of War, 1942-45. 
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Department of 

AIR SCIENCE 



ASSIGNED AT PENN STATE 

Major Oliver V. Robichaud, Military 
Science '54, has been assigned to duty 
with the Air Force ROTC detachment 
at Pennsylvania State University. 

Major Robichaud received the degree 
of Master of Business Administration 
from George Washington University. 
Prior to his new assignment, he was 
Manpower Officer at Naha Air Base on 
Okinawa. 

MILITARY SCIENCE GRADS SHINE AT 
HARVARD 

Twenty-four of the thirty-four Uni- 
versity of Maryland graduates who have 
attended the Harvard University Grad- 
uate School of Business Administration 
since World War II are holders of de- 
grees from the College of Military 
Science. This fine record was an- 
nounced recently by Dr. Les Rollins, 
Assistant Dean of the Harvard School 
of Business Administration. 

One of the Military Science gradu- 
ates, according to Colonel James Regan, 
Jr., (USA Retired). Acting Dean of 
the Maryland College of Military 
Science, is Colonel Charles F. Austin, 
recently a guest professor at Harvard. 
Colonel Austin earned his degree from 
the Harvard Graduate School "with 
distinction" in Business Administration. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

John A. Daiker 



SENIOR AWARDED 
ROTARY FELLOWSHIP 

John W. Dorsey, Jr., a senior econo- 
mics major, has been awarded a Rotary 
Foundation Fellowship for advanced 
study abroad during the 1958-59 
academic year. 

The fellowship, which is provided by 
Rotary International, is one of 113 



30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



awarded to outstanding students from 
30 countries. Providing transportation, 
tuition, books, room, board, incidental 
living expenses and an allowance for 
travel in Europe, the fellowship leaves 
the choice of educational institution 
entirely to the individual. Mr. Dorsey 
has chosen to attend the London School 
of Economics at the University of 
London. 

He recently won the Phi Beta 
Kappa Association Scholarship for 
his outstanding work at the University. 
In June he will receive his Bachelor 
of Science degree in Business and 
Public Administration. 

Currently, Dorsey is President of 
Phi Eta Sigma, scholastic honorary . 
Secretary of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
national leadership honorary; Men's 
League President and Chairman of the 
Student Government Association Elec- 
tion Board. He holds a seat on the 
Student Government Executive Council 
and on the Faculty Senate Committee 
on Student Life. 

DR. AHNERT ACTIVE 

Dr. Frank O. Ahnert. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Geography, has had a paper 
on the geography of Washington. D. C. 
published by a German geographic 
periodical. (Erdkunde, 1958. pp. 1-26). 
Dr. Ahnert has also been awarded a 
grant by the University's General Re- 
search Board for studies on the mor- 
phology of cuesta landscapes in New 
Mexico, Arizona and Utah, to be under- 
taken this summer. 

DR. WRIGHT PARTICIPATES 

Dr. Howard W. Wright. Professor of 
Accounting, has been selected to partic- 
ipate in a nation-wide seminar on New 
Developments in Business Administra- 
tion. Sponsored by the Ford Founda- 
tion, the seminar will be held at Wil- 
liams College, Williamstown, Massachu- 
setts during the entire month of August. 

PLANS FOR CURRICULUM REVISION 
ANNOUNCED 

The revision of the curriculums for the 
Department of Office Techniques and 
Management in the College, has been 
released by Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, Head 
of the Department. 

The revision calls for the name of 
the Department to be changed to that 
of Department of Office Management 
and Techniques. The special curricu- 
lums for which the department is re- 
sponsible in administering are the 
Management Through Integrated Data 
Processing and the Executive Secretarial 
Programs. 

(Continued on page 37) 



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ALLIANCE PLUMBING & r HEATING COMPANY 
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1360 OKIE ST., N.E. LA 6-3753 

WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



Hotel 

HEDIN HOUSE 

WASHINGTON'S NEWEST HOTEL 

Nearest the University 

Just three miles away and two 
blocks within the District line. 



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Phone 
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Make Your Reservations Early 




MAY-JUNE, 1958 



31 



For Reservations Write or Call Ocean City — ATlantic 9-6191 

STOWAWAY MOTEL 

22nd Street and Boardwalk, Ocean City, Md. 
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TA 2-1900 



Maryland's 
Playground 
Beckons Us 

By Sally Ladin Ogden 



Ocean City, Maryland, for years has 
been the favorite of Marylanders and 
now with the many new hotels and 
motels to choose from, since the era of 
the Bay Bridge, "our own playground" 
is more enticing than ever. 

In the past few years along the 
routes to the shore, many new restau- 
rants, hotels and motels have sprung 
up which are above average. Leaving 
Baltimore or Washington by way of the 
Bay Bridge there is a delightful dining 
spot on U. S. 50 called THE CAP- 
TAIN'S TABLE, operated by Mr. Sol 
Bloom. Here you can dine in splendor 
and relax among beautiful surround- 
ings on your way to and from the 
beaches. 

Approaching Ocean City, happy 
vacationers travel over the new dual 
highway and are met with a gentle 
southerly breeze and the salt-scented 
air which immediately makes one for- 
get the hot city and one's everyday 
cares. 

The beach at Ocean City is con- 
sidered one of the safest beaches along 
the entire Eastern seaboard and 
parents can relax while children play 
along the gentle sloping strand of 
white sands. 

The water is invigorating and one 
finds renewed energy and a zest for 
living at our own playgrounds. Need- 
less to say, appetites soar but here again 
Ocean City and its fine restaurants and 
hotels claim some of the finest southern 
chefs. 



■I ii 




!•■!!! so pi... 



— 9JI ■( 




■ I 



■» IB 



J ■ M ff 



ii H, 



MMfir 



hM--~t* 




5j George Washington Hotel 

BOARDWALK at 10th STREET 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Hastings — owners & managers 

Completely Redecorated 

126 BEDROOMS and DINING ROOM 

4ir-Cond/'tioncd Bedrooms on Request 
NEW NEW 

COFFEE SHOP COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

flljjfr^l EUROPEAN PLAN 

Centrally Located to all Churches 

Phone OCEAN CITY AT 9-6271 




32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



THE GEORGE WASHINGTON 
HOTEL, owned and operated by Mr. 
and Mrs. Franklin Hastings, is one of 
the beach's finest hotels. The splendor 
and plush of yesteryear abound ill this 
gracious resort hotel where the food 
and service ranks among the best. 

HARRISON HAIL, the beach's 
newest hotel, is owned and operated bj 

Mr. and Mrs. Ci. Hale Harrison. With- 
in the past few months a large con- 
vention room and forty bedrooms have 
been added to this very modern hotel. 
Every room laces the ocean or the baj 
and some have views of both. The 
Harrisons are genial hosts and their 
food is excellent. 

THE LANKFORD HOTEL, owned 
and operated by Miss Mary B. Quillan, 
is one of the fine old hotels where the 
true flavor of southern hospitality pre- 
vails. Miss Quillan has operated the 
Lankford for many years and her 
guests return year after year. 

THE STOWAWAY MOTEL, ultra 
modern, owned and operated by Mr. 
William H. Carrier, is located at the 
far north end of the beach. Here you'll 
enjoy the impressively beautiful ap- 
pointments of the motel as well as the 
quiet of the beach. A swimming pool 
provides the extra pleasure for those 
who prefer it. The food is delightful. 

THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL is 

owned and operated by Mr. and Mrs. 
E. F. Fleming. For years it has been 
considered one of the outstanding hotels 
on the beach. It is ideally located to all 
of the activities and is a pleasant place 
to relax and enjoy a leisurely vacation. 

SEASIDE MOTEL, owned and oper- 
ated by Mr. and Mrs. Norman Bunt- 
ing, offers the vacationer peace and 
tranquility where one can meditate and 
dream to the strains of the soft ripple 
of the sea. 

MERIDEL MOTEL is owned and 
operated by Mr. A. Percy Holland. 
Here the vacationer will find a delight- 
ful spot to repose in the calm of the 
shores' beauty. 

A "must" at Ocean City is BOB 
CHING'S RESTAURANT, operated 
by Mr. Ching. For many years visitors 
have been delighted with the deliciously 
different Chinese and American dishes 
which he personally prepares. Mr. 
Ching is an amiable host who also 
operates Bob Ching's Restaurant at 
Lake Worth, Florida, during the winter 
months. 



Harrison 

Finest Resort Hotel 
In Maryland 

77 OCEAN COOLED ROOMS 

ii ii i i •> , i 
, i /.' with view o ■' l '"i ■■ 

Bum 

Total I ■•!"!' H " ! ■ R ■ 

LARGE BANQUET HALL 

ELEVATOR SERVICE 

OCEAN DINING ROOM 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

PRIVATE BATH IN EVERY ROOM 
MR. » MRS. G. HALE HARRISON MANAGERS-OWNERS 

BOARDWALK AT 1 5TH ST.. PHONE OCEAN CITY AT 9-6222 

NEWEST HOTEL IN OCEAN CITY. MARYLAND 





MARIDEL 




Bob Ching's 

RESTAURANT 

and 

LA GRANDE HOTEL 

14th and BOARDWALK 
OCEAN CITY. MD. 

Phone ATlantic 9-6251 



ROOMS FROM $7.50 to $13.50 
FOR TWO PEOPLE 



OCEAN FRONT 



AMPLE PARKING 



Famous Chinese and 
American Cuisine 

Cocktails — Air Conditioned 




ROOSEVELT 
HOTEL 

OCEAN CITY. MD. 

On the Boardwalk, centrally lo- 
cated. An ideal vacation hotel. 
Famous Southern meals. .Make 
your reservations early. Special 
rates for June and September. 
Write or phone Mr. and Mrs. 
Elwood F. Fleming. 

Ocean City ATlantic 9-933 I 



MAY-JUNE, 1958 



33 




FRENCH 
PLACE VENDOME 



2 Years HOLIDAY award winner 

Closed Sundays 
ST 3-3779 

Chef-. Gus Diamant 

722 - 17th ST. N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Free Parking after 6 P.M. 



RESTAURANTS 
RIVE GAUCHE 

The Newest French Restaurant 
in Georgetown 

Closed Sundays 
FE 3-6440 

Chef: Eugene Bastisse 
WISCONSIN & M STS., N.W. 

Free Parking for Lunch and Dinners 



MARYLAND'S OLDEST AND LARGEST FURRIERS 

• FURS 
Exquisite Coats, 
Jackets, Capes, 
Stoles 

• RE-STYLING 
In the 
Advanced 
Modes 

• SAFE STORAGE 

Under Our 

Personal OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS * LE. 9-4900 

Supervision 2 25 N. HOWARD ST. BALTIMORE 1. MD. 





The emblem of elegant dining 

Eighteen-Steps-Down 

Cozy, intimate bar, serving 
your favorite drinks. 

Continental Dining Room 

for elegant dining 

Fleur-de-Lis Lounge 

Open for luncheon & dinner 

Cafe' de Paris 

Sidewalk cafe' 

MISCHANTON'S 

Easlpoinl Shopping Center at Open nightly til 2 a.m. 
Northpoint Rd. & Eastern Ave. ample parking 
ATwater 8-0130 



Mainland 

By Sally Ladin Ogden 

While in the Nation's Capital, there 
are three outstanding dining places 
which have received national acclaim. 
They are the RIVE GAUCHE, PLACE 
VENDOME and THE OCCIDENTAL. 

The RIVE GAUCHE, located at 
3200 M Street, Northwest, and the 
PLACE VENDOME, at 722- 17th 
Street, Northwest, are Washington's 
finest French restaurants, both operated 
by Blaise Gherardi, a Parisian. The 
Place Vendome, which has won the 
Holiday Magazine award for two suc- 
cessive years, was Mr. Gherardi's first 
venture in the restaurant business in 
Washington. It's success prompted him, 
in the spring of 1957, to open the very 
beautiful Rive Gauche, truly a bit of 
Paris in old Georgetown. 

As you enter this very fine dining 
establishment, you will be intrigued 
with the beautiful French paintings and 
prints. The entire far side of the room 
is a painting of gay "Paree," and the 
original site of the Parisian Rive 
Gauche. Wall to wall carpeting has 
an impressive all over pattern of a 
Coat of Arms inscribed "Fluetuat Me 
Mergitur" meaning "Still Afloat — Will 
Never Sink." 

The menu is printed entirely in 
French and the food is simply superb. 
Chefs and dining room personnel are 
all French. 



* Une Shade 


Shop | 


S and 


AFFILIATED PRODUCTS » 




2214 M Street, 


N. W. S 




WASHINGTON, 


D. C. 




FEderal 7-1200 


$ N 


anufocfurers and 


Distributor! ft) 


• 


Window Shades 




« * 


Venetian Blinds 




» • 


Folding Doors 




8) * 


Draperies and Ro 


ds 


$ * 


Screens 




» * 


Inside Shutters 




» * 


Porch Shades 




• 


Vertical Blinds 




1 * 


Decorative Wood 


Coverings v< 



34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






Wi 



amen 



There is an attractive private (.lining 
room for intimate parties and here, too, 
are more of Mr. Gherardi's fine French 
paintings. 

%- *K %> 

THE OCCIDENTAL RESTAU- 
RANT located at 1411 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, Northwest, is international!) 
known and is listed as one of the top 

ten restaurants in the United States 
today. Here you have an interesting 
old dining house which has celebrated 
its one hundreth birthday, still caus- 
ing on in the grand manner for which 
it has been famous throughout the years. 
The firm now, under the able direc- 
tion of Herman "Sonny" Price, presi- 
dent, was purchased from the late Gus 
Buckholtz family in 1953. Miss Fay 
Price, sister of the president, is his able 
assistant and manager. Between them 
they have preserved the fine collection 




MOON 
PALACE 



Washington's Most Dignified and 

Unique Chinese & American 

Restaurant 

That Is Truly Different 

* Intimate Cocktail Lounge 

* Authentic Chinese Foods 

* Superb American Cuisine 

* Private Party Facilities 

* Fast Home Delivery Service 

* Ample Free Parking in Rear 

* Open Daily and Sunday 

3308 WISCONSIN AVE. N. W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EM 2-6645-46 
Member of Diner's Club 




of photographs and mottos which were 
Mr. Buckholtz's "Gallery of Notables" 

and "Wisdom ot the Greats." 

I he gallery is a priceless collection 
oi signed portraits oi some of the mosl 
celebrated people of the century. 

Known in the beginning as The 
I hompson-Owens House, this famous 
old restaurant catered to such digni- 
taries as Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. 
Grant and other famous people of prc- 
Civil War days. 

There are few people living toda) 
who can remember the Old Thompson- 
Owens House and fewer who can re- 
call the old Pennsylvania Avenue Canal 
with its mule drawn barges moving 
slowly down from Georgetown to the 
southwest part of the city. 

Mr. Gus Buckholtz purchased the 
old Thompson-Owens House in 1912 
and changed its name to the Occidental. 
Mr. Buckholtz was a cordial host and. 
during the years which he operated the 
restaurant until his death in 1924, he 
collected his "Gallery of Greats" in- 
cluding photographs of such notables 
as Woodrow Wilson, The Duke of 
Windsor, Admiral Perry. Winston 
Churchill. Charles Lindbergh. Thomas 
A. Edison, Buffalo Bill, "Teddy" 
Roosevelt and many others. Mr. Buck- 
holtz made them members of his "Join 
the Picture Club". This famous col- 
lection which numbers into the thou- 
sands, is insured by the Price Manage- 
ment for a million dollars. Mr. Price 
says that this collection is invaluable 
as it would be impossible to duplicate 
or replace it. 



THE FASHIONABLE 

wesfchesler 

DINING ROOM 



.ri 



«~^<. -• 1 Jg / - Finest Cuisine-Served graciously in quiet luxury 

Superb wine cellar. For reservations call Arnold — WOodley 6-7700 

Cocktail* In "Tho loungo" or Dining room 

til © holiday rOOim Exquisite private accommodations 

for ten to fifty guests. 40 co cathedral AVENUE 

Free Parking for Dinner Guests from 6 to 10 P.M. IN MAIN GARAGE 




dSeaulifiit K^lotlieA 

JEANETTE BECK, INC. 
DRESSES 

1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONES: 
MULBERRY 5-1445 
VERNON 7-9574 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



35 



Qo* 



MaA^/land li/osn&n 



The Price Management have 
eliminated the bedrooms and suites 
which Mr. Buckholtz advertised for 
$6.00 a day and have converted them 
into five beautiful banquet rooms, 
namely. The Caucus Room, Capitol 
Room. Diplomat Room. International 
Room, and Statesmen's Room. 




UWAYS * MVORITI CtFTI 

Earle Kirkley, Inc. 

3413 Greenmount Ave. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



INTERIORS- 



by STEIN 



Complete con- 
sultation serv- 
ice for your 
Home or Of- 
fice (without 
charge or ob- 
ligation) 



Funiture from the better sources, 
Firth Carpets, Crest Lamps, and 
finer fabrics for curtains, dra- 
peries & upholstery. 
for estimates and information 
Call LE. 9S38A. 

WM. P. STEIN, INC. 

401 N. CHARLES at Mulberry 




The main dining rooms remain as 
they have been for years. The first 
electric stove installed in the Wash- 
ington area still adorns the north 
dining room and is used daily to brew 
international coffee. 

William Mueller, the Swiss chef of 
over 20 years with the Occidental, con- 
tinues to prepare the very fine foods 
for which the restauranfs reputation 
has made it the choice of thousands 
for many decades. 

The mottos in the dining rooms are 
wonderful bits of knowledge but one we 
like best is "Let no one beguile you 
with dreams of idleness, Life without 
toil, if possible, would be an intolerable 
existence. Work is the sublime luxury 
of life." — Warren G. Harding. 

*!* 4- & 

Anytime is the time for reading a 
good book and recommended by Mr. 
Alfred C. Choin, manager of the 
COKESBURY BOOK STORE, as 
"good reading" for the next few weeks 
are the following: 

Fiction 
The Winthrop Woman — Seton 
Ice Palace — Ferber 
By Love Possessed — Cozzens 
The White Witch — Goudge 
Maggie-Now — Smith 

Non-Fiction 
Please Don't Eat the Daisies — Kerr 
Masters of Deceit — Hoover 
Kids Say The Darndest Things — Link- 
letter 

Madison Avenue: U. S. A. — Mayer 
Day Christ Died — Bishop 




In The Beautiful 

ANNAPOLIS TERRACE MOTEL 

MEMBER OF THE DINER'S CLUB 



THE PERFECT BEGINNING AND 

HAPPY ENDING TO YOUR 

OCEAN CITY VACATION . . . 

The Captain's Table 

RESTAURANT and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

THE IDEAL STOPPING OFF POINT FOR BREAKFAST. 
LUNCH OR DINNER WHEN BOUND TO OR FROM 
OCEAN CITY. COMFORTABLY AIR-CONDITIONED. ON 
ROUTE 50. JUST WEST OF CHESAPEAKE BAY BRIDGE. 

ANNAPOLIS. MARYLAND 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Books 

Educational Games 
and Toys 

Stationery and 

Greeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

' Baltimore' 4 Guttural jbepcvitme+i£ Stone' 

WE PAY TOST I / Mo j| 0J]( | p(, 0Be orders shipped promptly. 
ON ALL BOOKj \ Wri(e fof Ueg too y c<| , | og 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 

Phone SA. 7-7280 

Baltimore, Md. 




COMBINED STUDIOS 

CULLEN PHOTO CO. 
ACADEMY PICTURES 

30 MINUTE SERVICE 

PHONE NA 8-6122, NA 8-3666 
1720 H ST. N.W., WASH. 6, D.C. 



ROBERTS CAMBRIDGE 

SHIPYARD 

Cltrls-Cralt 

Marine Railway 
Repairs A Specialty 

MARINE HARDWARE 

WET & DRY STORAGE— INSIDE and OUT 

Maryland Avenue — Cambridge, Md. 



36 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



College of Dentistry 

Continued from Page M 



Through these programs the Depart- 
ment attempts to extend the ahilits to 
students to solve current business and 
governmental problems through the use 
of the scientific method by offering 
courses that will enable the student to 
develop and participate in the "Science 
of Management" and a knowledge ol 
the managerial processes 

Highlighting the revisions anil addi- 
tions are the courses in Automation 
and Management Problems. Manage- 
ment and Office Operations, Data Pro- 
cessing for Internal Control and Elec- 
tronic Data Processing Systems which 
have been added to the curriculum. 
These upper division courses in manage- 
ment and executive training have been 
kept as free from prerequisites as pos- 
sible, so that more students may have 
an opportunity to elect these courses 
while pursuing an area of special in- 
terest. 

Freshmen will now be permitted to 
enroll in courses in the shorthand 
series. These courses were previously 
open at the sophomore level. These 
changes will become effective at the 
beginning of the 1959-1960 academic 
year. 

PUBLISH BOOK 

Dr. Dwight L. Gentry, Associate Pro- 
fessor, with Hugh G. Wales of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois and Max Wales of the 
University of Oregon, has recently had 
a book published. Advertising Copy, 
Layout, and Typography. 

GRADUATES INVITKD TO JOIN ALUMNI 
PRESS CLUB 

University of Maryland graduates 
now engaged in journalism or public 
relations work are invited to join the 
new Maryland Alumni Press Club. 
President George Cheely has an- 
nounced. The organization consists not 
only of those who majored in journal- 
ism or public relations, but any alumni 
who are engaged in any phase of those 
two fields. 

Those who would like to join the 
Press Club should send their one dol- 
lar yearly dues to Jim Coyne. Treas- 
urer, 8209 Meadowbrook Lane, Chevy 
Chase 15, Md. or to Dr. D. Early New- 
som. Executive Secretary. Dr. New- 
som is a faculty member of the De- 
partment of Journalism and Public 
Relations. 

Objectives of the Club are to render 
(Continued on next page) 



rs 



^OWEN ELECTRIC CO. 

"-ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 5 ENGINEERS 



Telephone: \\ Arfield 1-8500 



ENTERPRISE ROAD 



MITCHELLVILLE, MARYLAND 



of 

Plsittce. Qea>Ufe.'<L Gotutty, One. 

COMPLETE LAND TITLE SERVICE 



4312 HAMILTON STREET 

Hyattsville, Maryland 

HUBERT K.ARNOLD, Pres & Counsel 

Class of 1935 



APpleton 
7-6464 



2412 MINNESOTA AVE.. S.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

DOROTHY A. GILES, 
Sec.-Treas. 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 
SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 13. MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdmon Ave.) 




MAY-JUNE, 1958 



37 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



ORKS 



^BJRONVc 

Signers 

-"fester 



_S!NCE 



PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 

For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



Jfuller Sc b Albert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 

Since 1920 

Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



For All Your Floral Needs 
Plants 
Corsages 
Bouquets 




INC. 

NAtional 8-0106 FLORISTS j 

900 Fourteenth St., N.W. | 
Washington, I). C. j$ 

Patronize Maryland 



Magazine Advertisers 



all possible service to the Department, 
the advancement of the interests of the 
University, its undergraduates and grad- 
uates who are engaged in journalism 
or public relations, and promoting 
mutually beneficial relations between 
the University, the people of the State, 
and its alumni. 

In addition to Cheely, a CBS-TV 
newscaster, officers are Charles Puffen- 
barger, Washington Star. Vice Presi- 
dent; Mrs. Barbara Heine, Recording 
Secretary; Jim Coyne, Director of In- 
formation of the International Road 
Federation, Treasurer. Executive com- 
mittee members include Miss Adele 
Chidakel, Washington Star, and Jay 
Jackson, Glen Burnie Gazette. 

PLACE HIGH ON CPA EXAMS 

Donald Hudson and Daniel Suls, recent 
graduates, placed 1st and 2nd in the 
November examination for Certified 
Public Accountants given by the Mary- 
land Board. 

NEWS OF 1958 GRADUATES 

1958 graduates: Carl Fretts is with the 
Ford Motor Company. David Cham- 
pion is with H. Zinder Associates in 
Washington, D. C. E. E. Marsh, Jr. 
is with National Dairy. Richard L. 
Phillips is with U. S. Air Force Audit. 
Carroll Kite is with Standard Oil Com- 
pany in Baltimore. 

JOHNSON PROMOTED 

Richard A. Johnson, '55, has recently 
been promoted from Ensign to Lieu- 
tenant (j.g.) in the U. S. Navy. He is 
presently supply officer on the U.S.S. 
Pawcatuck. 



School of 
DENTISTRY 



Gardner P. H. Foley 
Kryle W. Preis 



REPORT ON THE HARRINGTON FUND 

A recent anonymous gift of $459.50 
has brought the total of the Albert A. 
Harrington Student Loan Fund to 
$1336.28. Dr. Oscar W. Meyer, '25, 
of Hasbrouck Heights, N. J., who has 
been a very generous contributor, has 
already given $200 of a pledged $250. 
The Fund was created by his fellow 
New Jersey alumni as a tribute to the 
memory of Dr. Harrington. '10, who 
died on August 24, 1953. The Fund 
has rendered a valuable service to a 
host of appreciative students of the 
School who have been given temporary 
financial aid bv the Fund. 



C D. C. Ignition "^ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

* Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor troubles 

• Tune up . . . 

* Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: NAtional 8-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V^ Washington, D. C. J 



Bank of Maryland 

SEAT PLEASANT, MD. 

— Branches — 

BOWIE - CAPITOL HEIGHTS 

CORAL HILLS • LANHAM 

SUITLAND 

HILLCREST HEIGHTS 



SUITLAND CENSUS FACILITY 



<^>£.x<jina itudsnti and 

aLumni or tne 

LLnivs.xi.itu of 

<zy\\a\uLand 

35 ueaxi. 

lustihe mcHoison 

Gliev>io.let 
Oldi+tiabile 

<Pkd jCuiilne . . . 
ne.ad or Lrotn comtianizi 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



FOURTH YEAR OF TAYLOR SCHOI ARSIII I' 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship, 
which was presented to the School on 
September 21. 1954, is in its fourth 
year and has been awarded to mem- 
bers of each of the tour classes now 
in session. An outstanding award in 
dental education, the Scholarship was 
conceived and arranged by Mrs. E. 
Benton Taylor to perpetuate her hus- 
band's faithful interest in the students 
of the School. 

The Scholarship was first awarded 
at the beginning of the 1954-1955 
academic year to George L. Plassnig, 
of Baltimore, a member of the Class 
of 1958. Other recipients of the Schol- 
arship are John W. Myers, of Fairplay. 
Md., Class of 1959; Alvin J. Snyder. 
of Baltimore, Class of I960: John G. 
Goetee. Jr. of Reisterstown, Md.. and 
Donald A. M. Brown, of handover 
Hills, Class of 1961, who received a 
joint award. 

WASHINGTON ALUMNI BREAKFAST 

By Joseph P. Cappuccio 
A very successful Alumni breakfast of 
the National Alumni Association of 
the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland was held at the Shoreham 
Hotel on Tuesday March 11, 1958. 
This breakfast was held in conjunc- 
tion with the Post Graduate Clinic of 
the District of Columbia Dental Society. 

Approximately 85 alumni and guests 
were present from various sections of 
the east coast. This meeting marked 
the largest gathering to attend a Wash- 
ington, D. C. alumni breakfast. 

This affair was under the direction 
of Dr. Ashur G. Chavoor, a graduate 
of the Class of 1948. 

Seated at the head table were Dean 
Myron S. Aisenberg. Dr. Edwin G. 
Gail, President-elect of the National 
Alumni Association, Dr. Frank Hurst, 
Past-President of the National Alumni 
Association, Dr. Kyrle W. Preis. Editor 
of the National Alumni Association. 
Dr. Melvin H. Colvin, President of the 
District of Columbia Dental Society. 
Dr. Ashur G. Chavoor and Dr. Joseph 
P. Cappuccio, Secretary of the National 
Alumni Association, Miss Katharine 
Toomey, administrative secretary to the 
Dean. 

Due to illness. Dr. Daniel E. She- 
han, President of the National Alumni 
Association, was unable to attend. Dr. 
Cappuccio represented Dr. Shehan on 
behalf of the National Alumni Associa- 
tion and he brought greetings from the 
President. 

Dr. Chavoor, as Host-chairman, gave 
(Continued on next page) 



CONGRATULATIONS - — 

&t<z&<s. a£ '5b 7 

To you, the new alumni of the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry, we extend our very best wishes for 
a successful career in the practice of your chosen pro- 
fession. 

We cordially invite you to come in and inspect the 
facilities of one of America's largest laboratories. 




o-operative 

Dental Laboratories 

A, Hum el OtntMl »r»tlhtllct 

12 W«>| Madiion SlrMt 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



SERVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION 
WITH DISTINCTION SINCE 1910 



I 



McLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co.. Inc. 



CUT STONE 



Bladensburg, Maryland 



~— CRUSTY PIE CO. ^^ 

Quality 

PIES - CAKES - PASTRIES 



30 



OSt. N.E. 



Washington, D. C. 



ADams 2-7111 



8&a Auick yet 

Jack Daniels Buick, inc. 

8526 GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JUniper 9-9385 

"Silver Spring Has Everything' 



modern 
machinists co. 

Genera/ Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE • AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St.. N.W. 

Washington. 0. C. 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



39 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

• Established 7 859 • 

Crushed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 

Stephen City, Va. 

Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



Genera/ Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 

Main Office — Monument 3-3104 

Frederick, Md. Plant — Monument 2-1181 




THE THOMAS DISTRIBUTING 
COMPANY 

1008 S. Potomac Street 
Hagerstown, Md. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 


Distributors 


Shell Petroleum Products 


Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 


FREDERICK. MD. 



a word of greeting and welcomed the 
many alumni members present at the 
meeting. He introduced, Dr. Cappuccio 
who served as toastmaster. Dr. Colvin 
was introduced as President of the D. 
C. Dental Society and as a graduate of 
the Dental School. University of Mary- 
land. Dean Myron S. Aisenberg was 
called upon to report on the activities 
of the dental school. He informed the 
alumni of the many changes that are 
occurring at the dental school and that 
the School will offer its first Post- 
Graduate course in Endodontics dur- 
ing the summer. Dr. Gail, the Presi- 
dent-elect, informed those present of 
the breakfast meeting to be held in 
Dallas, Texas during the ADA meet- 
ing. He asked that the alumni con- 
tinue to support its association which 
seems to be growing in number each 
year. 

The Secretary, Dr. Cappuccio, re- 
ported on the activities of June Week 
to be held on June 4, 5, 6, 7, 1958. 
He stated that many alumni sections 
are in the process of organizing. At 
present there are two official alumni 
sections, the New Jersey alumni Sec- 
tion and the Rhode Island Alumni Sec- 
tion. It is hoped that there will be 
new sections organized in West Vir- 
ginia, North Carolina and Florida. 

Among those introduced were Dr. 
Daniel F. Uynch, a Past-President of the 
ADA and Dr. James H. Ferguson, Jr., 
a Past-President of the American Col- 
lege of Dentists. Both of these dis- 
tinguished gentlemen are graduates of 
the Dental School, University of Mary- 
land. 

Dr. Hurst, a Past-President of the 
Association, and Dr. Kyrle W. Preis, 
the Editor of the Association, were 
given a fine ovation when they were 
introduced from the head table. The 
largest ovation was reserved for Miss 
Katharine Toomey, who is loved and 
revered by all of our alumni for the 
many nice things she has done through- 
out the years. Also introduced as hard 
working members of the Association, 
Dr. W. Paul Hoffman, Dr. J. P. Fitz- 
gerald, Dr. George B. Clendenin who 
were very active on the Constitution 
and By-laws Committee of the Asso- 
ciation. These men contributed greatly 
to the newly proposed Constitution and 
By-laws of the National Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Phil Taylor, the Director of 
Visual Education, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, must be congratu- 
lated for the excellent job that he ac- 
complished photographing this most 
memorable breakfast meeting. 

This meeting will long be remem- 




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40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



bcrcd by all those in attendance as 
being one of the joyful and happy oc- 
casions in the lives of our alumni mem- 
bers. 
1907— Richard F. Simmons, Norfolk, 

Va. 
1910— S. Vernon Strickler. Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 
1915 — James H. Ferguson. Jr.. Balti- 
more. 
1916— Denzell C. Blevins, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
191 X— Edward Gail, Baltimore; Dan 

O. Via, Charlottesville, Va. 
1921 — Maurice A. Brackett, Federals- 
burg, Md. 
1922 — Myron S. Aisenberg, Baltimore; 
John F. Clark, Baltimore; Ronald 

C. Dove, Lacombe, La. 

1924 — James B. Bradley. Washington, 

D. C; Albert R. James, Silver 
Spring, Md.; James W. McCarl, 
Greenbelt, Md. 

1925 — Ernest M. Colvin, Washington, 
D. C; Daniel F. Lynch, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Leonard A. Romino, 
Fairmont, W. Va.; Howard B. Wood, 
Cumberland, Md. 

1926— Roy H. Bridger, Silver Spring, 
Md.; Allan L. Watts, Shippensburg, 
Pa. 

1927 — John P. Fitzgerald, Washington, 
D. C; Paul Hoffman, Washington, 
D. C; Frank Hurst, Washington, 
D. C. 

1928— William C. Bashore, Bethesda, 
Md.; Melvin H. Colvin, Washington, 
D. C; Charles K. Gould, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Wilbut B. Mehring, Silver 
Spring, Md.; A. Harry Ostrow, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1929 — George B. Clendenin, Bethesda, 
Md.; Kyrle W. Preis, Baltimore. 

1934 — John P. Grove, Baltimore. 

1936 — Samuel Hanik, Silver Spring, 
Md. 

1937— F. Melvin Edwards, Red Bank, 
N. J.; John Heck, Baltimore; Robert 
G. Miller, Baltimore. 

1938 — Julian W. Habercam, Baltimore; 
Jack M. Messner, McLean, Va.; 
Ernest V. Williams, Washington, 
D. C. 

1939— Robert E. Jacoby, Chevy Chase, 
Md.; Harold E. Plaster, Shelby, N. 
C. 

1941 — Robert N. Baker, Kings Moun- 
tain, N. C. 

1942 — Lewis C. Toomey, Silver Spring, 
Md. 

1943 (March)— Richard S. Mehring, 
Kensington, Md. 

1944 — James J. Brown, Washington, 
D. C; Walter B. Brown, Fairmont, 
W. Va. 

1945 — John J. Cicala, Silver Spring, 
(Continued on next page) 




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Md.; Gerald Rose, Washington, D. C. 

1946 — Joseph P. Cappuccio, Baltimore; 
George B. LaMotte, York, Pa. 

1947 — Samuel W. Johnston, Fort 
Lauderdale. Florida. 

1948— W. Robert Biddington. Balti- 
more; Ashur G. Chavoor, Washing- 
ton. D. C; William P. Dodson, 
Arlington. Va.; Paul H. Loflin, 
Beckley, W. Va.; Edwin R. Rapp, 
Silver Spring. Md.; William T. 
Strahan, Silver Spring, Md.; Ben A. 
Williamowsky, Silver Spring, Md. 

1950— Clement F. Hahn. Elkton, Md.; 
A. Clyde Hannah, Salisbury, Md. 

1951 — Douglas A. Edwards. Red Bank, 
N. J.; Jack D. Robertson, Washing- 
ton. D. C; Thomas E. Wolf, Lan- 
caster, Pa. 

1952 — John G. Barry. Baltimore; 
Eugene Hinds. Baltimore. 

1953 — Sidney C. Abrams, Kensington, 
Md.; James Markwood, Rockville, 
Md.; Kenneth W. Prentice, Silver 
Spring, Md.; Harvey L. Wertz, Silver 
Spring, Md. 

1954— Kenneth H. Stoll. Arlington, Va. 

1955 — James T. McCarl, Greenbelt, 
Md.; William F. Martin, Jr., Balti- 
more; Albert W. Zanner, Jr., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1956 — Kenneth E. Bertram, New Cum- 
berland, Pa.; Clayton S. McCarl, 
Greenbelt, Md.; Harry L. Mertz, Jr., 
Edgewood, Md.; James Philip Norris, 
Baltimore: Raymond W. Palmer, Jr., 
Catonsville, Md. 

1957 — William G. Franklin, Gaithers- 
burg, Md.; Herbert H. Rust, Silver 
Spring, Md. 

DEAN AISENBERG HONORED BY 
NEW JERSEY ALUMNI 

The New Jersey Alumni Association 
honored Dean Myron S. Aisenberg at 
the Association's annual dinner held in 
Newark on February 8. Among the 
125 who attended was a large repre- 
sentation from the Baltimore area. Also 
present were Dean Maxwell of the 
Seton Hall. Dental School, Dean Wil- 
son of the Fairleigh Dickinson Dental 
School, Dr. Frost, President of the New 
Jersey State Board of Dental Examiners, 
and Dr. Schweikhardt, Secretary of the 
Board. 

Those attending from Baltimore were 
G. M. Anderson, A. Bell, R. Palmer, 
D. Shay, J. H. Ferguson. Jr., W. Kress, 
Elmer Hoffman, W. Graham, W. Ram- 
sey, D. V. Provenza, E. G. Vanden 
Bosche, I. Abramson, W. R. Bidding- 
ton, J. E. Pyott. A. D. Aisenberg. B. 
Pollack, R. Leonard, C. L. Inman, Sr., 
D. E. Shehan, J. Cappuccio, K. Preis, 
C. A. Bock. C. A. Schulthers, L. Em- 
mart, and G. Clcndenin. 



42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






Dr. Aisenberg was presented uith a 
plaque upon which is engraved this 
tribute: "Presented to Dr. Myron S. 
Aisenberg in recognition of his many 
years of unselfish service to the dental 
profession and in appreciation of his 
devoted efforts in behalf of our alumni." 



GIFT TO SCHOOL FROM N. .). A1UMN1 

The New Jersey Alumni Association 
recently presented to the School a 
Page-Chayes handpiece. It has been 
placed in the Department of Crown 
and Bridge. This gift reflects the fine 
spirit of loyalty which has been con- 
sistently demonstrated by the New 
Jersey group. 

MARISTANY AND LOPEZ-SOTO 
HONORED IN PUERTO RICO 

A recent issue of the Revista Dental. 
publication of the College of Dental 
Surgeons of Puerto Rico, paid a fine 
tribute to Dr. Carlos F. Maristany, a 
member of the University of Maryland 
Class of 1918. A Past President of the 
College and a Fellow of the American 
College of Dentists, Dr. Maristany is 
described as one of the most valuable 
and substantial dentists of Puerto Rico. 
Since his graduation Dr. Maristany has 
been a most loyal alumnus and has 
brought a reflection of great personal 
respect and high professional standing 
to his alma mater. 

In another issue the Revista Dental 
cited the outstanding professional status 
of Dr. Augustin Lopez-Soto, '46 — 
"dynamic defender of the dignity of the 
profession and enthusiastic participant 
in the social and civic activities of 
Arecibo." Dr. Lopez-Soto is a Past 
President of the Arecibo District Dental 
Society and Past Commander of his 
American Legion Post. He has 
practiced in Arecibo since his discharge 
from the Army in 1948. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

M. Marjorie MacMurray 



DR. DORN TAKES POST 

Dr. Wesley N. Dorn, who received his 
M. Ed. from the University, has been 
appointed supervisor of instruction in 
the State Department of Education. 

Dr. Dorn received his A. B. degree 

from Gettysburg College, and his D. 

Ed. from Teachers College, Columbia 

University. He has also had a year of 

(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE, 1958 



graduate studj in l aim at Princeton 

l imeisity. 

DR. (.oki v si \| i mi MB) R 

Dr. Lillian I , Gore, I .1.1). "54. is .. 
si.iii membei ol the Primarj Division ol 
the l . S. Office ol Education. Dr. Gore 

is on leave from her position ol 

Elementarj Supervisor, Montgomery 
County Schools. Rockville, Maryland, 
for the academic year 1957-58. 

DR. S( ARBOROUGH a I rEXAS 
Dr. Olive Renfroc Scarborough, Jul. I). 
'52. is now Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cational Psychology, University of 
Texas, Austin, Texas. Formerly Dr. 
Scarborough was a staff member of the 
State Department of Education of 
Georgia, Atlanta. Georgia. 

EDUCATION PLACEMENT SERVICE 

In the spring of 1957, a teacher place- 
ment service was instituted in the Col- 
lege of Education for graduates of the 
fession. The service is intended to bene- 
fit both University graduates and super- 
intendents of the State in staffing Mary- 
land's schools. All seniors completing 
professional requirements for a Mary- 
land teaching certificate may make use 
of this service which supplements that 
provided by the University Office of 
Placement. Activities engaged in dur- 
ing the current year include: 

Cooperation with the University 
Placement Service on national 
teacher placement. 

Establishment of files of application 



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blanks and information on many 
school systems. 
Maintenance of a bulletin board list- 
ing recent job openings, salaries 
and general teacher placement in- 
formation. 
Arranging on campus placement in- 
terviews with school system per- 
sonnel officers. 
Cooperation in planning Annual Edu- 
cation Forum of the all — Univer- 
sity Career Week. 
Placement counseling for special em- 
ployment problems. 
Maintenance of credentials folders 
on graduates available to school 
hiring officers. 
Coordination with Maryland school 
officials in bringing jobs and peo- 
ple together. 
Cooperation with college staff in 
phases of pre-service preparation 
relating to placement. 
University entering the teaching pro- 
More than 450 people have listed 
their names with the placement service 
since its beginning. 

It is hoped that these services may be 
extended to former graduates and 
advanced degree candidates as the pro- 
gram expands and facilities become 
available. 

DENEMARK TO BECOME DEAN 

George W. Denemark, Assistant Dean 
and Professor of Education in the Col- 
lege of Education, will be leaving the 
University this summer to assume the 
duties of Dean of the School of Educa- 
tion at the University of Wisconsin, 
Milwaukee. The Wisconsin School of 
Education staff currently numbers fifty- 
five, thirteen of whom are teachers in 
the Campus school, a kindergarten 
through grade eight laboratory school 
completed four years ago. 

During his two-year tenure at the 
University of Maryland Dr. Denemark 
served as Director of Undergraduate 
Teacher Education and coordinated 
student teaching activities in the Col- 
lege of Education. He came to Mary- 
land from four years service as Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Association for 
Supervision and Curriculum Develop- 
ment, a department of the National 
Education Association. 

Dr. Denemark is originally a middle 
westerner, having been born in Chicago 
and attended the Universities of Chicago 
and Illinois. 

MISS SILAR TO RECEIVE 
BUSINESS EDUCATION AWARD 

Miss Beverly J. Silar, '58, has been 
selected as the recipient of the 1958 
U. B. E. A.-Smead Professional Award 





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44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



for Outstanding Achievement in Busi- 
ness Education. 

This award is sponsored jointly by 
the Smead Manufacturing Companj 
and the United Business Education As- 
sociation, N.E.A. and is presented with 
the hope that it will stimulate profes- 
sional interest and development through 
active participation by young business 
educators in professional organizations. 

While a student in William Penn 
High School, York. Pennsylvania and 
at the University of Maryland, Miss 
Silar was active in such organizations 
and activities as: National Honor So- 
ciety, Latin Society, French Club, Clio 
Literary Society, Thespian Dramatic 
Society, Student Government, Year- 
book staff, Red Cross, and Youth Fel- 
lowship groups in her church. 

Beverly plans to accept a position for 
the fall of 1958, in a public high school, 
to teach business subjects. 

DR. HYMES ADDRESSES NEW YORK GROUP 

Dr. James L. Hymes. Jr., Chairman 
of the Childhood Education Depart- 
ment, was the Luncheon Speaker at the 
Joint Annual Conference of the New 
York State Association for Childhood 
Education and the New York State As- 
sociation for Nursery Education in 
Rochester, New York, on March 22. 
In recent months he also spoke at an 
in-service meeting of the teachers of 
Allentown, Pennsylvania and has been 
a Danforth lecturer at Trenton, New 
Jersey State Teachers College. 

MISS GLASS IN NEW ORLEANS 

Between semesters Miss Christine Glass 
attended an interdisciplinary conference, 
sponsored by the Ross Laboratories and 
planned by the Medical School of 
Tulane University in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, on the "'Child at Law." 
From New Orleans she made a hasty 
trip to Chichen Itza and Uxmal, 
Yucatan to vist the famed Maya ruins. 

DR. ULRY PARTICIPATES 

Dr. Orval L. Ulry participated in the 
Teacher Education section of the 
Northeastern Ohio Teachers Associa- 
tion annual meeting in Cleveland, Octo- 
ber 26 and 27, 1957. As moderator of 
a panel discussing "Working Together 
To Provide Better Teacher Education," 
Dr. Ulry gave a brief introductory pres- 
entation identifying pertinent problem 
areas for the panel members to discuss. 
Dr. Ulry represented the College of 
Education at the recent national meet- 
ing of the American Association of Col- 
leges for Teacher Education, held in 
the Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, 
February 20-22, 1958. As a contributor 
(Continued on next page) 



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of the thirty-seventh yearbook of the 
Association for Student Teaching and 
the National Society of College Teachers 
of Education, Dr. Ulry was a guest of 
the Executive Board of the Association 
at an "Honors Breakfast" on Saturday 
morning, February 22, 1958. 

At the Adelphi Elementary School 
Parent Teachers Association meeting on 
April 1, Dr. Ulry spoke on the topic 
'Science Curriculum for the Elementary 
School." 

On Thursday and Friday, March 13 
and 14, Dr. Ulry attended the Second 
National Conference on Aviation Edu- 
cation and Eighth Annual Conference 
of National Aviation Education Council. 
This meeting was held in the May- 
flower Hotel, Washington, D. C. The 
general theme of this conference was 
"Aviation Education: Its Past, Present 
and Future." Of particular interest was 
the Friday morning session reports on 
aviation education practices in the 
field. Reports of practices were given 
from: Brightwood School, Washington, 
D. C; Franklin School, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia: Clover Park School, Takoma, 
Washington; Burroughs Junior High 
School, Detroit, Michigan; Forest Hill 
School, Akron, Ohio; and Kansas State 
Department of Education. 

Dr. Ulry also attended the National 
Convention of the National Science 
Teachers Association held in Denver, 
Colorado, March 26-29, 1958. On 
Friday, March 28, he participated as 
a panel member presenting material 
on the general subject of "How Can 
We Use the Knowledge of Current 
Science to Improve Science Teaching 
in the Junior High School?" On Satur- 
day morning he presented a paper 
entitled "A New Design in Teacher 
Education for Prospective Science 
Teachers," before the College-level sec- 
tion of the "Here's How I Do It" meet- 
ings. 

STUDY OF THE HIGH SCHOOL 

The University of Maryland through 
Dr. Orval Ulry is cooperating with the 
State of Maryland, Department of Edu- 
cation, in a research study designed to 
determine the four-year pattern or 
patterns of subjects taken by the 23,000 
seniors that plan to graduate in June 
of 1958. In addition Dr. Ulry is asking 
students who have taken advanced 
courses in the areas of science, mathe- 
matics and foreign language to indicate 
on a checklist why they chose these 
courses. Students who did not take 
advanced courses in these three areas 
are asked to indicate on a similar check- 
list why they did not choose to take 
such courses. Findings in this study 



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46 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



will be used by the State Department 
in re-writing the high school standards 
for the State of Maryland and by I he- 
University of Maryland in attempting 
to improve the undergraduate teacher- 
education program for prospective 
science teachers. 

Dr. Ulry's participation is being 
financed in part by a small grant from 
the Graduate Research Board of the 
University of Maryland. 

RECENT GRADUATES TEACHING 
Students in the College of Education 
who completed their work in January 
and who are now teaching in Prince 
Georges County include Carolyn Mc- 
Vearry at Hollywood School, Dorothy 
Bradley at Parkway School, and Mari- 
lyn Reber at Greenbelt Center School. 
Jean Scoltock Skoglund, '58, is now 
teaching in Seattle, Washington. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION STAFF MEMBERS 

PARTICIPATE IN SPRING MEETING OF 

M.V.P.A. 

George R. Merrill, instructor in the 
Industrial Education Department spoke 
before the Work Experience section. 

Dr. William F. Tierney participated 
in a meeting of related subject matter 
teachers dealing with the topic "How 
Can We Improve Instruction?" 

Dr. Donald Maley was Chairman 
of the Memorial Committee which was 
in charge of the ceremonies honoring 
the late Glen D. Brown, formerly Pro- 
fessor and Head of the Industrial Edu- 
cation Department and Dr. John J. 
Seidel, former Assistant State Superin- 
tendent of Schools in charge of voca- 
tional education. 

The meeting was held at Gaithers- 
burg, Maryland on Saturday. March 22. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 



A . Bernard Eyler 



CHECKING IN AROUND THE COUNTRY 

Warren E. Bleinberger, '51, has recently 
been promoted to Department Chief; 
Cable Engineering, Western Electric 
Co. at the Point Breeze Works, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Harold L. Cromwell, '47, is now 
Plant Manager of the Freeport Plant 
of the Stauffer Chemical Co. of Free- 
port, Texas. 

Robert E. Dunning, '33, is Chief of 
Engineering and Construction, U. S. 
(Continued on next page) 



For Your 



Enjoyment 
MEADOW GOLD ICE CKKAM 




Rich, smooth. 
Delirious . . . 
A Taste Treat 
for every Occasion. 



Meadow Gold Products Co. 



Ask For Our Flavor Of The Month 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 
WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







WASHINGTON PLY-RITE CO. 

Established 1924 

Waterproofing Engineers 

31 K St. S. E. LI 6-7900 
Washington, D. C. 



~ V 


BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"/2ecame 2ualitu Gandcioud-" 


•- 


PLANT: 621-27 G STREET. N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



47 



SHORE 

DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 

• wholesale plumbing 

• and heating supplies 

Salisbury, Md. 

• PHONE PI 9-3121 

Boston, Md. 

• PHONE TA 2-2810 

Milford, Del. 

• PHONE 8922 

over, Del. 

PHONE 7453 

nley, Va. 

• PHONE SU 7-2415 

Show Room at all Locations 



A> PLANTATION 



ANGUS BULLS 

IMPORTERS - EXPORTERS - 

BREEDERS, of 

Scotch, and Irish Aberdeen-Angus 

Performance Attested Bulls for Sale 

Request Folder, Data Sheets, Prices 

Address: James B. Lingle, Manager 

(Telephone: TAylor 7-2041) 



WYE PLANTATION, Queenstowtt.Md. 



t S. ADKIIIS 


& 
CO. 


everything 

needed 

for 

building " 




Phone PI 9-3171 
Salisbury, Md. 




Atomic Energy Commission, Los 
Alamos, New Mexico. 

David R. Fetters, '46, currently is 
Chief Engineer in Fiberglass Molding 
Plant for Camfield Fiberglass Plastics, 
Zeeland, Michigan. 

Louis Flax, '43, recently left the 
Atomic Energy Commission where he 
served as an Engineer-Lawyer, to join 
May, Shannon & Morley, Washington, 
D. C. as an attorney specializing in the 
field of administrative and public utility- 
law. 

Frank P. Flury, '49, is currently serv- 
ing as Councilman for the City of Col- 
lege Park in addition to acting as As- 
sistant States Attorney for Prince 
Georges County. 

Herbert G. Gelhardt, '57, is em- 
ployed as Civil Engineer and Assistant 
Manager of the Asiatic Division for the 
Master Builders Co. of New York, and 
now living in Tokyo, Japan. 

Capt. Ector B. Latham, '24, retired 
October, 1957 as Portland District Of- 
ficer for the U. S. Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, Portland, Oregon. 

Marion B. McVernon, '54, at present 
is employed as Assistant Professor of 
Construction Technology for the New 
York City Community College. 

C. Swan Weber, '27, began his en- 
gineering as a student trainee with the 
Westinghouse Corporation in 1927 and 
is now Vice President of Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation. 

John P. Luscombs, February EE 
graduate was the second college gradu- 
ate to report to the Vitro Laboratories, 
Silver Spring, Maryland as a result of 
the current college recruitment pro- 
gram. Luscombe has been assigned to 
the Systems Development Department. 

WITH THE SERVICES 

John Berry Clark, '55, 1st Lt. U.S.A.F., 
serving as Assistant Chief. Environ- 
mental Protection Branch, Aeronautics 
Division, Hq. A.R. D. C. 

Stanley G. Green, '57, is a U. S. N. 
Candidate Officer. Civil Engineers 
Corps. 

Warner H. Hord, Jr., '57, is cur- 
rently serving in the Armed Services. 
Prior to this he was employed at the 
Naval Ordnance Laboratory. White 
Oaks, Maryland. 

Leonard M. Tinnan, '53, currently 
serving as Project Engineer for U.S.A. F. 
as a 1st. Lt. stationed at Dayton, Ohio. 

Lt. Col. Leon R. Yourtee, Jr., '39, 
is now stationed at Fort Lee, Virginia, 
Army Logistics Management Center, as 
a member of the Staff and Faculty. 

A. J. Kuprenas, '54, has just returned 
from two years service in Europe 
stationed at Chambley, France. 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK! 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



ALBERT 
W. SISK 
& SON 



National Distributors 
selling Canned and Frozen 

FOOD PRODUCTS 
Since 1891 

Two Offices To Serve You: 

PRESTON, MD. 
ABERDEEN. MD. 



J.I 



CREOSOTED 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Charles M. Harmon, '54, having com- 
pleted his M.S. at the University oJ 
North Dakota, is now at the University 
of Wisconsin as an Instructor in the 
Mechanical Engineering Dept. while 
studying for his Ph.D. 

Herbert K. Hunter, '56, received Ins 
M.S. degree in 1957 at California In- 
stitute of Tcchnolog> where he is con- 
tinuing his studies. 

Jose Ramon Vendrell. '57, is study- 
ing for his Masters Degree at The Johns 
Hopkins University. Baltimore. Marx- 
land. 

FACULTY TRAVELS 

Professor John W. Jackson, Mechanical 
Engineering Department is completing 
a year's leave of absence in Ankara, 
Turkey, where he has been serving as 
a Technical Advisor on Courses and 
Curricula for the Middle East Technical 
University. 

Dr. Shan-fu-Shen of the Aeronautical 
Engineering Department is currently in 
Zurich, Switzerland where he is pre- 
paring material on Hydro-dynamic 
Stability for the Princeton "High Speed 
Aerodynamics" Series. Also, he has 
presented a lecture at the Mathematics 
and Mechanics Colloquium at Frei- 
burg, Germany. At the invitation of 
the D.V.L. he will lecture at Aachen, 
Germany. 

Dr. Shih I. Pai, Institute of Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, 
is spending a year working at D. V. L. 
in Aachen, Germany and will also 
lecture at the D. V. L. Meeting. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Mrs. June Wilbur 



HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION MEETS 

The Maryland Home Economics As- 
sociation under the Presidency of Pro- 
fessor Jane Crow met at Friendship 
Airport on March 21 and 22. An in- 
dustry exhibit was one of the features 
bringing the guests up to date on new 
developments in home appliances, 
equipment and furnishings. 

STUDENTS VISIT 

Students in the Department of Practical 
Art have recently been privileged to 
visit furniture and carpet show-rooms 
and museums in New York City. They 
also were invited to visit and tour the 
Washington, D. C. home of Mrs. Perle 
Mesta. 

(Continued on next page) 





SeaV^ 




MASON CANNING COMPANY, INC. 

POCOMOKE CITY. MARYLAND 



C. C. OLIPH ANT & SON, INC 

ESTABLISHED 192] 
ROOFING and SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS 

Heating - Ventilatinq • Air Conditioning 

"BARRETT" - BONDED ROOFERS - "CAREY" 



Telephones : Day 7555 - Night 3789 



LAUREL, DELAWARE 



GEORGE BERT. CROPPER 

Registered Professional Engineer 
and Land Surveyor — General Contractor 




TRANSIT MIXED CONCRETE 
AND BUILDING MATERIALS 

TELEPHONES: 
Res. AT 9-7568 — Office AT 9-9494 

North First Street and Bay 
Ocean City, Maryland 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 

CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 
918 Cooper St. • Salisbury, Maryland • PI 9-5444 



Hot Rolled Bars 

co ID F.NISHED bars The EASTERN SHORE STEEL CO. 

Structural Shapes 

Hot rolled Plates Complete Steel Warehouse Service 



Floor Plates 
Jalloy H. T. Plates 

Pipe 
Hot Rolled Sheets 



Cold Roi 1 i d 

Sill! IS 
GALVANIZJ Ii Sill I I'- 
ll"! Roi 1 1. n Strip 
Drili Hon fi Tool 

Steels 

t l d- a ninn c I- L. u I -I E.XPANDED Ml PALS 

Tel. P. 9-9200 Salisbury, Maryland DetormkdBam 



314 West Carroll Street 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



49 




L Jtofo JLn 
for Lroa 



narwmas 



irams 



— Vj»falo 



and J\)a 



3 



azincs 



Tke 

ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

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MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



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For Over A Half Century 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 
and ACCESSORIES 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 
in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



De! Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 

AAA — Open Year Round 

Hot Water Heat 

Best Foods from our Restaurant 

WEbster 6-48B2 



BECOMES REGIONAL DIRECTOR 

Professor June Wilbur has become the 
Regional Director of the Washington 
Fashion Group. Among the projects 
undertaken by this group have been 
the production and presentation of the 
Fashion Show for the annual Cherry 
Blossom Festival, the production and 
presentation of the Italian Couturier 
Fashion Show which was a March of 
Dimes benefit, and the development of 
a Fashion Course. 

The Fashion Course was held on six 
Wednesday evenings, beginning March 
26 and ending April 30. Expertly 
qualified speakers gave a broad picture 
of a specific field of fashion, followed 
by a question and answer period. 

SUE WEINTRAUB IN GERMANY 

Sue Ann Weintraub, '55, recently ar- 
rived in Nurnberg, Germany and has 
joined the Special Services staff of the 
U. S. Army in Europe as a service club 
recreation director. The clubs provide 
off-duty entertainment and recreation 
for servicemen through such facilities 
as game rooms, dances and tours of 
the area. 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BANQUET 

The senior class of the School of Law 
and the Maryland judiciary gathered 
at the Sheraton Belvedere Hotel March 
29 for the Annual Banquet of the 
School of Law Alumni Association. All 
the members of the Class of 1958 were 
there as non-paying guests of the 
Alumni Association. 

Dinner was served following the Pro- 
cessional and the Invocation. A new 
slate of Association officers was unan- 
imously elected following dinner. The 
new officers are: Benjamin Rosenstock, 
'25, President; Hon. Emory H. Niles, 
'17, First Vice President; Hon. Layman 
J. Redden, '34, Second Vice-President; 
Mary Arabian, '44, Third Vice-Presi- 
dent; and G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29, 
Secretary-Treasurer. Also unanimously 
elected was the Executive Committee 
which includes: Rignal Baldwin, Esq., 
'27; Thomas N. Berry, Esq., '40; Clay- 
ton C. Carter, Esq., '46; Hamilton P. 
Fox, Jr., Esq., '47; J. Harold Grady, 
Esq., '42; David Harkness, Esq., '38; 
Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29; J. 
Hodge Smith, Esq., '39; Marvin H. 
Smith, Esq., '41; Leonard Weinberg, 
Esq., '19. 



mRRYLAIlD'S FII1EST COM 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



iHlTCHms, 



SHOE PEG 




MTE SWEET 



^GOLDEN SWEET 



- Packed by 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

FERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



PESTS? 



"Call 7Ae 



TERMITES? 



Rode Man" 




P Est control since i8d 



C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



The BARN 

Restaurant and 
Sportsman's Bar 

Gateway to the Famous 
Chesapeake Bay Country. 
Facing on Routes 
2 and 301. 





GLEN BURNIE, MD. 

First and Still 
Foremost Restaurant 
on Governor Ritchie 
Highway 



Class J 928 

Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 

Hyattsville, Md. 



50 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Fifteen guests received awards from 
Dean Roger Howell. Membership in 
the Order of the Coif was extended to 
Robert R. Farncll, III, Martin B. Green- 
feld, Joseph M. Roulhac, and Nelson 
B. Seidman. Judge Hall Hammond of 
the Maryland Court of Appeals was 
elected to honorary membership in the 
Society. 

The Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll C'hes- 
nut Prize went to Mr. Seidman. The 
Sam Allen Memorial Prize went to 
Samuel L. Frecland. The United States 
Law Week Award went to Richard A. 
Urbus. Mr. Seidman also received the 
Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation 
Prize and Mr. Greenfeld the Nu Beta 
Epsilon Prize. The Samuel S. Levin 
Prize went to Richard E. Lovell. 

Maryland Law Review certificates 
were presented to Charles Cahn, II, 
Samuel L. Frecland, David H. Gilbert, 
Martin B. Greenfeld, Leroy Handwer- 
ger, Robert F. Hochwarth, Charles P. 
Logan, Jr., Richard E. Lovell, Dene L. 
Lusby, Saule J. McGrane, Joseph M. 
Roulhac, Nelson B. Seidman, and 
Richard A. Urbus. 

Entertainment for the Banquet was 
provided by Tip and Joanie Hubbell. 
Joanie and her husband, Clayton B. 
Burton, are members of the day law 
school Class of 1960, each holding an 
Alumni Scholarship. Tip, Joanie*s 
brother, is a pre-law senior at College 
Park. Philip H. Volk, B.P.A. '50, was 
the soloist, singing the Lord's Prayer 
accompanied by Mrs. David L. Brig- 
ham. 

Hamilton O'Dunne, Esq., of the Bal- 
timore Bar and son of Hon. Eugene 
O'Dunne, retired from the Supreme 
Bench of Baltimore City, was the main 
speaker of the evening. His address, 
"The Perfection of Federal Legisla- 
tion," was a very humorous and enter- 
taining talk. 

At an Executive Committee meeting 
after the Banquet, preliminary plans for 
the 1959 banquet were made for Satur- 
day, April 11, to be held at the Shera- 
ton Belvedere Hotel. 

NAMED TO STATE LAW POST 

Eli Baer, '25, was recently appointed a 
special assistant assigned to the De- 
partment of Motor Vehicles. A great 
increase in the Department's legal work 
over the last few years prompted the 
action. 

A native Baltimorean, Mr. Baer has 
been active in professional, religious 
and civic organizations. 

NAMED PRESIDENT 

Gordon Munson Allen, '48, has been 

named President of the Criminal 

(Continued on next page) 



A SALUTE TO THE CLASS OF 58 

Dietrich Brothers congratulates the University's gradua- 
ing seniors. May you follow in the lint' traditions of 
Maryland grads of the past . . . and set new standards 
for those of the future. 



BRIBERS 



STEEL FABRICATING - STEEL WAREHOUSING 

BALTIMORE 18, MD. RALEIGH, N. C. 

Phone: HOpkins 7-9700 708 Insurance Bldg. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. Phone: TEmple 2-5623 







ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



VjaltiHtctt i /yieneet (Lnvelooe ylLanuractuzet 

Established 1912 

Factory and Office: 2510 LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D.C. ADams 4-3979 



LELAND L. FISHER, Inc 



BUILDERS HARDWARE 

LUMBER — MILLWORK — PAINT 



Rockville, Md. 



POplar 2-6123 






• 


Buy 


Defense Bonds 


Every Payday 




J. H. F. 




• 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



51 



Brass & Copper 
Supplv Co.. Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

NON-FERROUS NAILS, 

RIVETS, ETC. 



Distributors of 

RODS — SHEETS 

TUBES — FITTINGS 

BOLTS — NUTS 

SCREWS 



501 W. 23rd Street 

Baltimore 11, Maryland 

BEImont 5-1500 



IW^a 



HOTEL 



►PLY CO. 



E8T - Purveyors of Fin. W27 

MEATS - POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

Te Hot.u. 

Institutions. Ships, 

Clebs. Et«. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Jumiture 
Merlor Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and Institutions for 

over 62 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU 5-4510 Baltimore, Md. 



"^ 



J 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 

Baltimore 2. Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



Justice Commission of Baltimore. A 
member of the Commission for the past 
six years, Mr. Allen's appointment was 
unanimous, according to Alvin J. T. 
Zumbrun. Executive Director of the 
Commission. 

A native of Baltimore. Mr. Allen was 
graduated from Gilman School in 1939, 
where he was named to the All-Mary- 
land football and lacrosse teams. He 
received a Bachelor of Arts degree 
from Princeton University in 1943. 

Mr. Allen has been active in civic 
affairs, participating in the Red Cross- 
Community Chest Joint Appeal and 
the American Cancer Society Fund 
drive. He is a former member of the 
Junior Association of Commerce and 
served for a year as legal adviser to 
that body. 

CANCER CRUSADE CHAIRMAN 

Bill L. Yoho, Prince Georges County 
attorney, has been appointed Cancer 
Crusade Chairman for 1958 by William 
R. Reading, General Chairman of the 
Prince Georges County chapter of the 
American Cancer Society. 

Mr. Yoho is a member of the Col- 
lege Park law firm of Hoyert and Yoho. 

FEY NAMED PRESIDENT 

John T. Fey, '40, clerk of the United 
States Supreme Court, was recently 
elected by the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Vermont and State Agri- 
cultural College to succeed Dr. Carl 
W. Borgmann as President of the Uni- 
versity, effective July 1. 

Mr. Fey attended high school in 
Cumberland, Maryland, and completed 
undergraduate work at Washington and 
Lee University. He received the LL.B. 
degree from the University of Mary- 
land, and was awarded the Master of 
Business Administration degree by 
Harvard University. 

He has served as Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court since July, 1956, when 
he was appointed to that post by Chief 
Justice Earl Warren. He is the twelfth 
clerk to serve the Court since the ap- 
pointment of the first clerk in Febru- 
ary. 1790. 

Mr. Fey practiced law in Cumber- 
land, and served from 1946 to 1950 
in the Maryland Legislature as a Re- 
publican member of the House of Dele- 
gates, and was also attorney to the 
Allegany County Board of Commis- 
sioners. He was appointed to the 
faculty at George Washington Uni- 
versity as Associate Professor of Law 
in 1949. 

In 1952 Yale University awarded him 
the degree of Doctor of Juridical 




HOME GARDEN 

CHEMICALS . . . 

At Leading Garden Supply, Hardware 
and Department Stores 

BULK CHEMICALS . . . 

For Farm Use. See Your Miller Dealer. 

MILLER CHEMICAL AND 
FERTILIZER CORP. 

Baltimore 18, Maryland 




King Bros.Jnc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratogo 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE. MD. 



52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Science for his work in the field ol 
taxation. 

He was named Acting Dean of the 
George Washington University law 
School in June. 1953, and Dean in 
October of that year. He current!) 
teaches Federal Income laxation. Real 
Property, and Legal Accounting as a 
Professor of I -aw on the part-time 
faculty of George Washington. 

President Borgmann. in commenting 
on Mr. Fey's appointment, said. "I am 
very much pleased with the decision. 
I believe John Fey's appointment is an 
excellent promise for the continued 
growth and quality of the University." 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



DR. STAUFFER OPENS OFFICE 

Dr. John C. Stauffer, has opened his 
office for the practice of internal medi- 
cine in Hagerstown, Maryland. 

During the past 18 months Dr. 
StaufTer has been a resident physician 
on the staff of the University Hospital 
in the divisions of endocrinology, 
arthritis and radioisotopes. He main- 
tains his affiliation with the University 
of Maryland Medical School as instruc- 
tor in the several fields in which he has 
particular qualifications. 

Dr. Stauffer graduated from Phillips 
Andover Academy and Princeton Uni- 
versity before receiving his degree in 
medicine from Harvard Medical School 
in 1953. 

ASSIGNED TO WALTER REED 

Captain Herbert J. Levin, '54, recently 
was assigned as a resident physician in 
urology at the Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center, Washington. D. C. 

NAMED SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Dr. Louis A. Buie, '15, Emeritus Head 
of the Section of Proctology in the 
Mayo Clinic. Rochester, Minnesota, and 
Emeritus Professor of Proctology in 
the Mayo Foundation. Graduate 
School. University of Minnesota, has 
been named Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Advisory Board for Medical Specialties. 

LLOYD COMPLETES COURSE 

Captain William T. Lloyd, '56, recently 

completed the military orientation 

course at Brooke Army Medical Center, 

(Continued on next page) 




1740 \Ji 

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MAR Y I AM (J }■*- 




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FOR RESERVATIONS — LYric 2-2781 



CLOSED MONDAYS 



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YEARBOOKS • CATALOGUES • PERIODICALS • LIMITED EDITIONS 




Raise Poultry 
the Modern Way 

For 22 years, we have been perfecting 
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skilled craftsmen in our modern factory. Only 
the finest materials are used. 

Write for our latest Catalog and 3-Way 
Purchase Plan. 

Harford Metal Products, Inc. 
Box MM, Aberdeen, Md. 

Oldest Manufacturers of Poultry Cages 



Since 1884 

Midstate Federal 

Savings & Loan 

Association 

5304 YORK ROAD 
Baltimore 1 2, Md. 

"Where Savings Are Safe" 



MAY-JUNE. 1958 



53 



FOR centuries, GLASS has been 
the preferred container for 
quality products — from bever- 
ages to cosmetics. Glass bottles for 
milk and other beverages still are 
preferred by discriminating people 
because they are assured of free- 
dom from contamination of product, 
pick-up of foreign taste or odor, 
and one can SEE both quantity 
and quality. 

Glass bottles require no lining 
material — they are rigid and stable ; 
they are not absorbent and cannot 
leak or become saturated and soft. 



BUY BEVERAGES 
IN GLASS BOTTLES 



THE BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30, Md. 

Originators of the Square 
Milk Bottle 



fyttf&vmi jj 




% 



lajualitu and 
^rrtidtru Jsn 



FINE FOOD & DRINKS 
Visit Out Internationally Famous Wine Cellar 

FIFTH AVE. a BRENTWOOD 

DUNDALK, MD. 

For Reservations Call 
ATwater 5-0520 • ATwater 4-9854 



Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The course 
is designed for newly commissioned of- 
ficers and offers instruction in basic 
Army procedures and field medical 



School of 

NURSING 



Mrs. Selma Kleckner 



RESIDING IN NEW JERSEY 

Mrs. Augusta Koffman Neff, '48, is 
now residing in New Jersey. Her 
husband, Ray, won a fellowship to 
Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia. 

IN JOHNSTOWN 

Mrs. Nancy Amadon Thomas, '49, has 
moved to Johnstown, New York. She 
substituted in general duty at the local 
hospitals until her son, Gregory, was 
born. Gregory is now six weeks old. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

Mrs. Freda Fazenbaker Gill, '29, is 
now Coordinator of Kingsport Practical 
Nursing School, and finds this work 
most interesting. She hopes to return 
for her Class Anniversary in 1959. 

Mrs. Nancy Ann Cochran Hubbard, 
'47, is now living in Kalamazoo, Michi- 
gan. Her husband, Dr. Edwin Hub- 
bard, is in partnership with another 
pathologist there. Nancy says she likes 
the town very much. 

Mrs. Joyce Smith, '47, is now on the 
staff at the Garfield General Hospital, 
in Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Anna Rudloff, '52, says that 
she and her family are now enjoying 
their new home at 3608 Courtleigh 
Drive, Randallstown, Maryland. 

Dorothy Pollock Toom, '37, is now 
living in Viet Nam where her husband 
is stationed. They plan to return to the 
states early this spring. They will leave 
by ship from Singapore and spend three 
weeks touring Europe. They will 
arrive in New York in late May, on 
the ship America. They are eager to 
show their one year old son, Bobby, to 
their friends back home. 

Norma Johannes Engleman, '36, 
wishes to thank the Alumnae Associa- 
tion for its assistance during her four 
years illness in the sanitorium. The 
many cards and gifts she received there 
were a great comfort to her and were 
deeply appreciated. 



For more news from the School of 
Nursing see the Social Notes Column. 



JAMES POSEY 

and 
ASSOCIATES 



Consulting 



Engineer 



10 E. Pleasant St. 
Baltimore, Md. 



52nd ANNIVERSARY 
1906 1 1958 




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54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



College of 

SPECIAL AND 

CONTINUATION 

STUDIES 



AIR FORCE CENTERS IN SPAIN JOIN 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

OVERSEAS PROGRAM 

The University of Maryland Overseas 
Program has moved into yet another 
geographical area, the storied land of 
olive trees, Don Quixote, and bull 
fights. In cooperation with the U. S. 
16th Air Force (SAC), the program 
has been established on Air Force bases 
in Madrid, Sevilla, Moron and Zara- 
goza. 

A full-fledged program is now under- 
way, and it will be possible for many 
security forces personnel to complete 
degree requirements for the Bachelor of 
Arts in General Studies and the 
Bachelor of Science in Military Science 
during their tours in Spain. 

Another important feature of the 
program includes offering courses in 
the Spanish language. The foreign 
language program is part of an armed 
forces program to encourage military 
personnel to become proficient in at 
least one foreign language. 

With the opening of the Spain Pro- 
gram, Mr. James V. Compton was as- 
signed to Madrid to teach American 
Civilization and International Political 
Relations. Mr. Compton has lectured 
on his specialties for the past three 
years in Europe. A graduate of 
Princeton University, he earned his 
master's degree at the University of 
Chicago in 1952. 

Also teaching in the Spain Program 
is Mr. William Gombar, a graduate of 
Scranton University. Mr. Gombar 
received his M. A. degree from North- 
western. He has also studied at Laval 
University, Quebec, and at Harvard. 
At one time, Mr. Gombar worked with 
the Turkish Ministry of Education at 
Istanbul. 

TWO NEW FIRSTS IN OVERSEAS 
GRADUATION 

Military installations on Okinawa, in 
the Far East, and at Keflavik, in Ice- 
land, recently honored their first grad- 
uates in the University of Maryland 
Overseas Program. 

Captain Felix L. Goodwin, a trans- 
portation officer in the United States 
Army Ryukyus Command, completed 
his Bachelor's degree in Military 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1958 




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Science in November. 1957, after 
seven years of study. He has been a 
student in the University of Maryland 
Overseas Program in Europe, the North 
Atlantic, and Korea in addition to 
Okinawa. 

Captain Goodwin had this to say in 
praise of the University's Overseas Pro- 
gram: "I am sure there are thousands 
of other service personnel who share 
my feeling that the University of Mary- 
land Program is one of the best things 
to be obtained in the service." 

Having entered the military service 
at the age of 20, he now has only two 
more years to put in before becoming 
eligible to retire. He is not sure 
whether he will retire or stay on. Cap- 
tain Goodwin, who in his educa- 
tion career received a "C" average only 
once, is not satisfied to end his formal 
education at this point. He is seriously 
considering graduate study as soon as 
conditions permit. 

Lt. General James E. Moore. Com- 
manding General of the Ryukyus Com- 
mand, hailed Captain Goodwin's 
achievement by stating: "You have 
demonstrated that you possess the 
character and determination which 
intensive, prolonged study requires." 

Joining in the ceremonies for Captain 
Goodwin, held at the Officers Club, 
Fort Buckner. Okinawa, were Dr. John 
L. Bastian, Education Adviser; Mrs. 
James E. Moore, wife of the Com- 
manding General; Lieutenant General 
Moore; Dr. Mason G. Daly, Director 
of the University's Far East Division; 
Mrs. Goodwin, and Dr. Stanley J. 
Drazek, Associate Dean of the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies. 

The first Keflavik graduate was 
Lieutenant Colonel Carl Bradford, 
United States Air Force, who received 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Military Science in commencement 
ceremonies at the Base Chapel in 
January. 

Mr. George Dillavou, Assistant to 
the Dean, CSCS. in charge of the 
Atlantic Division, presented Colonel 
Bradford with his diploma. Among 
those attending the commencement 
were the Chief, Division of Defense, 
Icelandic Foreign Ministry and Mrs. 
Tomas Arnason; Director of Educa- 
tion and Mrs. Helgi Eliasson; Acting 
COMICEDEFOR, Colonel Klem F. 
Kalbcrer: Colonel and Mrs. Leslie B. 
Shaw. Colonel Shaw, who is Chief of 
Staff. Iceland Air Defense Force, de- 
livered the welcome address. 

OVERSEAS LECTURERS PUBLISH WRITINGS 

Two members of the European staff 
recently announced publication of their 



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56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



works. Veteran Lecturer in English, 
Harold T. McCarthy, announced that 
his new hook, "Henry James — The 
Creative Process," will be published 
this year by Thomas Yoseloll", Inc.. of 
New York City. Dr. McCarthy joined 
the European stall' in the tall of 1955. 
A recent issue of SEVENTEEh 
Magazine carried Dr. Joseph L. leach's 
original story, "The Yale Bowl-Over." 
Dr. Leach, an English Lecturer, joined 
the European staff in the fall of 1957. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Notice of Alumni marriages, en- 
gagements and births should be 
directed to the attention of the 
Editor, Maryland Magagzine, Ad- 
ministration Annex Building, 
University of Maryland, College 
Park. 



MARRIAGES 
SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI 

Britta H. Fris, '52, to Lieutenant (j.g.) 
Richard A. Phillips, on February 15, 
1958. 

Gwendolyn Statler Frisino, '50, to 
Mr. Harold Wilson, on October 11, 
1957. 

Jean Groton, '50, to Mr. Stanley 
Corbett, on May 4, 1957. 

Mrs. Evelyn Shipley, '53, to Dr. 
Sadredin Musavi on April 12, 1956. 

Mary Ann Brislin, '51, to Mr. Neal 
Keller, on January 4, 1958. 

Major Estelle Travers, A.N.C., '39 
to Major Paul Ernest on January 25, 
1958. 

Marion Carson, '51. to Mr. George 
O. Boettiger, on August 17, 1957. 

Jane Catherine Eisenhauer, to Mr. 
Gene P. Chufar on March 8, 1958. 

Elsie SchufF, to Mr. George Geidel, 
on Aligust 30, 1957. 

Susan McCaw, '55. to Mr. Louis 
Schap, on March 6, 1957. 

Arta Lee Bowen, '57. to Mr. Joseph 
Sutton on June 15, 1957. 

Roberta Settle, '57, to Mr. William 
J. Barlow, on August 12, 1957. 

Mrs. Florence Fitzgerald (Day), 
'48, to Mr. Frances P. Kerger, on July 
20, 1957. 

Virginia Speer, '55, to Lt. (j.g.) 
Rodney Thorson, on August 3, 1957. 

Mary Susan Yeager, '53, to Mr. 
(Continued on next page) 



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Joseph M. Quattro on August 3, 1957. 

Jane Alice Boynton. "52. to Dr. 
Robert Day on September 6. 1957. 

Mrs. Mary G. Yates Cruikshank. '41. 
to Mr. William G. Fountain on August 
28. 1957. 

Carolyn Louise Ingrick. B.S. & R.N.. 
'56. to Mr. George D. Uveges on 
October 12. 1957. 

Mary Benevicz. '55. to 1st. Lt. Ben 
Nowland U.S.A.F. on November 24, 
1957. They were married at Williams 
Air Force Base. Chandler. Arizona. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Selwyn Jeffrey Heller. 
Arts & Sciences '49. announce the birth 
of a daughter, Neddi Adele. on Tues- 
day, February 4, 1958. Mr. and Mrs. 
Heller reside at 641 East Oliver Street, 
Long Beach, New York. 

Dr. and Mrs. Kyle Y. Swisher, a 
daughter. Nancy Sue. on December 16, 
1957. Mrs. Swisher was Nan Ritten- 
house, '49. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hojnowski. a 
daughter, Victoria Ann. on November 
3, 1957. Mrs. Hojnowski was Ima E. 
Stumpf. '47. 

To Captain and Mrs. Paul A. Moore, 
a son. Thomas Arthur, on June 13. 
1957. Mrs. Moore was Ernestine John- 
son, '44. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Horn, a 
daughter, Jean Susan, on December 13, 

1957. Mrs. Horn was Florence Wong. 
'47. 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton P. Mieczniko- 
ski, a son, Paul Milton, on December 
8, 1957. Mrs. Miecznikoski was Jeanne 
Hook, '51. 

Dr. and Mrs. William E. Wolfel, Jr., 
a son, David Allen, on January 3rd, 

1958. Mrs. Wolfel was Grace Florence 
Bassler, '50. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Besett, Jr., a 
son, Harry Bernard, on July 19, 1957. 
Mrs. Besett was Mary Catherine Byrnes. 
'47. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Leo Umstead. 
a son, Stanley Leo, on August 9, 1957. 
Mrs. Umstead was Rebecca Lillard, '45. 

Mr. and Mrs. George L. Rayburn, a 
son, George Thomas, on January 14. 
1958. Mrs. Rayburn was Joan Elaine 
Gleason, '50. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Pendleton, a 
daughter, on November 22, 1957. Mrs. 
Pendleton was Grace Elizabeth Angel- 
berger, '42. 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Woodson, 
a second son, Beverly Tucker, on June 
21. 1957. Mrs. Woodson was Ann 
Penelope Tucker, '42. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Bernstein, 
a daughter. Laurel Beth, on July 16, 
1957. Mrs. Bernstein was Shirley 




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58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Guralnick, '53. 

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Connor, .1 
son, John Michael, on October 30, 
1957. Mrs. Connor was Nancy Silver. 
"52. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Bailey, .1 
daughter, Louanne, on September 10. 
1957. Mrs. Bailey was Ruth Louise 
Hutchinson, "50. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris L. Renshau. 
a daughter, Leslie Ann. on October 28, 
1957. Mrs. Renshaw was Nancy Jean 
Strong, '52. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Williams Clemens, 
a daughter, Kimbcrly Ann, on Novem- 
ber 14, 1957. Mrs. Clemens was 
Audrey Ann Layman, '55. 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Schmidt. 
Ill, a son. Richard William. November 
14. 1957. Mrs. Schmidt was Dorothy 
Eleanor Hucksoll. '51. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Gavcr, a 
daughter, Anne Valerie. December 17. 
1957. Anne W. Schuck. '55. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Petrick. a 
son, William Roger, December 20. 
1957. Mary Anne Michelitch, '44. 

Dr. and Mrs. Luis F. Gonzales, a 
son, Wm. John, on February 6, 1958. 
Mrs. Gonzales, '55. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terz D. Dearing. a 
son, Terry Philip, on December 22. 
1957. Phyllis Catherine Redifer, '55. 

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Buchan, a 
son, Keith Alstaire. on January 5, 1958. 
Mrs. Buchan was Niki L. Nations. '55. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



HARRISON P. HAGEMEYER, JR. 

Harrison P. Hagemeyer, Jr., '50, whose 
assignment as a reporter for the Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald included 
coverage of University of Maryland 
Campus affairs from 1952 until 1956, 
died March 22 at Georgetown Hospital 
following an emergency brain operation. 
He was 3 1. 

Mr. Hagemeyer first attended the 
University of Maryland in 1943, first 
as a civilian then as an Army Special 
Training Program student, but was 
ordered into combat service in 1944 
during the crisis brought by the Battle 
of the Bulge. He served as a bazooka- 
man with the 26th Division on the 
Western Front until wounded in action. 

After the close of hostilities, he at- 
tended The Actors School in London. 
Following his discharge from the Army, 
he enrolled again at Maryland and took 
(Continued on next page) 

MAY-JUNE. 1958 



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a position as a copy boy with the Post. 

With graduation, he was promoted 
from Head Copy Boy to Reporter and 
assigned to Metropolitan Police Head- 
quarters. From 1952 to 1956. he 
covered Prince Georges County, then 
was assigned to Montgomery County 
for the 1956 election. He was moved 
to the Washington office in 1957 as a 
rewrite man and general assignment 
reporter early last year. 

Mr. Hagemeyer's last major assign- 
ment was in Annapolis where he re- 
ported the closing days of the Mary- 
land General Assembly's 1958 session. 

Born in Meridian, Mississippi, he 
came to Washington with his parents 
when he was two years old. He was 
raised in the Southeast section of the 
city near Capitol Hill, and was a 1943 
graduate of Eastern High School. 

In April 1953, he was married to 
Miss Patience Sheila Foss. They 
bought a home at 3372 Wintergreen 
Avenue, North Forestville a year lat- 
ter. Mrs. Hagemeyer and their chil- 
dren Susan Ann, 2, and Richard Har- 
rison, 9-months now live at that ad- 
dress. 

Mr. Hagemeyer's devotion to his 
family and home was reflected in his 
reportorial answer to an author's dia- 
tribe against the suburban way of life. 

In the Washington Post of Nov. 13, 
1956 he wrote: "I get a kick out of 
driving up to my own driveway at the 
end of the day, noticing that my own 
front lawn could stand a going over 
with my own rotary-mower, kissing my 
own wife and daughter and firmly 
closing my own door on the outside 
world." 

The story brought him an award and 
a testimonial dinner from the Wash- 
ington Home Builders Association. 

Mr. Hagemeyer is also survived by 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harrison P. 
Hagemeyer, Sr. and a sister, Margery 
Lou, of Silver Hill, and a brother. 
James Roy, of Oxon Hill. 

Funeral Services were at the Lee 
Funeral Home in Washington and inter- 
ment was at Arlington National Ceme- 
tery. 

Francis Porter, 
Maryland Correspondent 
Washington Daily News 

JUDGE EDWIN T. DICKERSON 

Judge Edwin T. Dickerson, Law '02, 
died February 5 at Union Memorial 
Hospital, Baltimore, ten days after suf- 
fering a fall. Judge Dickerson, who 
served 12 years on the Baltimore Su- 
preme Court, was 79. 

He was honor man in his graduating 
class and his perfect score in the bar 



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60 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



examinations was the first time it had 
been accomplished. 

DR. 1 AKI I GRIM I 111 HKIiniNC. 

Dr. Earle Breeding. Med. '13. died 
January 16 at Doctors Hospital, Wash- 
ington. 13. C. Dr. Breeding began his 
practice in 1919 and retired last June. 
He was a leading ear. nose and throat 
specialist for main /ears. 

He enlisted in the Army in 1917 and 
served as a captain in the Medical 
Corps in World War I. He was a life 
member of the Military Order of the 
World Wars. 

Dr. Breeding was a Past President 
of the Washington Medical and Surgi- 
cal Society, Past Chairman of the 
Otolaryngology Section of the Medical 
Society of the District of Columbia 
and a former Professor of Otolaryn- 
gology at the George Washington Uni- 
versity Medical School. 

DR. S. LLOYD JOHNSON 

Dr. S. Lloyd Johnson, Law '32, died 
suddenly February 4 of acute leukemia 
at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

A native of Masontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, Dr. Johnson received his M. D. 
degree from Johns Hopkins Medical 
School in 1918. Because he felt that a 
knowledge of law would be helpful in 
the many problems brought to him as 
a physician, he managed to acquire 
such a knowledge from the University 
of Maryland School of Law. In recent 
months he had been taking further 
courses. 

Dr. Johnson was enthusiastic about 
the general practice of medicine in an 
era when many physicians leaned to- 
ward specialization. He helped organize 
the general practitioners of the State 
into the Maryland Academy of General 
Practice and was the first President of 
that body which was affiliated with the 
national organization. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mrs. Laura Polly Clark Noell, '16, in 
July, 1957. 

Mrs. John Willian Stoner, '44, on 
February 26. 1957, she was Dorothy 
Mae Pearson. 

Mary Elizabeth Mann. '03. in 
December 1957. 

Elizabeth Getzendanner. '09, on 
February 6, 1958. 

Mrs. Jane Scott Lloyd, '24. on 
February 21, 1958. 

GENERAL W. LEE HART 

Brigadier General W. Lee Hart, Med. 

'06, one of the pioneers in a movement 

to obtain a $2 million station hospital 

(Continued on next page) 



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61 



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at Fort Sam Houston. Texas, in the 
1930's, died recently. 

The station hospital later became 
known as Brooke Army Hospital and 
became one of the world's leading 
medical centers. Hart was a military 
and civilian medical leader in Texas 
since 1911. After retiring from the 
Army on January 31. 1945, Hart served 
as Dean of the Southwestern Medical 
School in Dallas. 

During his Army career, he was 
noted for research in tropical medicine. 
United States and seven foreign 
countries for his medical research. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE REILEY 

First Lieutenant George M. Reiley. 
Military Science '54. was among four 
crew members killed when an Air 
Force jet bomber crashed and exploded 
near Lancaster, Ohio. He was killed 
when the six-jet RB-47 bomber 
plunged to earth while beginning its 
descent for a landing at Lockbourne 
Air Force Base. 

Funeral services were held at the Fort 
Myer chapel and burial was at Arling- 
ton Cemetery. 

DR. VICTOR H. GOTTSCHALK 

Dr. Victor H. Gottschalk, former As- 
sistant Professor in Chemical Engineer- 
ing, teaching metallurgy, died in March. 
He retired from the University a few 
years ago at the age of 74, later repre- 
senting the University at the Army 
Chemical Center in charge of super- 
vising graduate training courses. Dr. 
Gottschalk was 80 years old. 

DR. HERBERT F. GORGAS 

Dr. Herbert Ferdinand Gorgas, "91, of 
Baltimore, died on February 11. Born 
in Baltimore on November 21, 1870, 
Dr. Gorgas graduated from the Balti- 
more Polytechnic Institute in 1887. 
Dr. Gorgas had practiced for over a 
half century before his retirement. He 
was the son of Dr. Ferdinand J. S. 
Gorgas '55 (B.C.D.S.), who served as 
Dean of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery (1865-1882) and of the 
University of Maryland School of Den- 
tistry (1882-1911). Dr. Gorgas's sur- 
vivors include his wife, Mrs. Rosalie 
Hoffmann Gorgas; two daughters: Mrs. 
Roger U. Ehrlich and Mrs. Louis S. 
Heim, of Baltimore; and a son, Herbert 
D. Gorgas, of Albany, N. Y. The death 
of Dr. Gorgas marks the end of the 
active alumni affiliation of the Gorgas 
family that had extended over more 
than a century. 

DR. MARION N. KING 

Dr. Marion Norwood King. "97, of Nor- 
folk. Va., died on September 8. On 



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62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



his graduation Dr. King was awarded 
the University Gold Medal for Scholar 
ship. In 1 898 Dr. King graduated 
from the University of Maryland 
Medical School with honorable men- 
tion. During his professional career 
he practiced medicine exclusively. Dur- 
ing World War I Dr. King served as 
Captain of a Service Battalion. 

DR. CHAR! I S \ MINE 
Dr. Charles A. Stine. "23 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Baltimore, died on February 17. A 
native of Gilberton. Pa., Dr. Stine had 
practiced in Baltimore. He was a mem- 
ber of Xi Psi Phi. He is survived b> 
his wife, Mrs. Gladys Evans Stine. and 
two sons: Joseph E. and Dr. Charles 
J. Stine. of the Class of 1950. 

DR. GEORGE H. MCDONALD 

Dr. George H. McDonald. '05 ( B.C.- 
D.S.), of Neepawa, Manitoba. Canada. 
died recently. Dr. McDonald was a 
member of Xi Psi Phi. 

DR. CLEMENT A. ZERDESKY 

Dr. Clement Anthony Zerdesky. '28, of 
New Philadelphia, Pa., died on June 
3. 1957. Dr. Zerdesky practiced in 
Tamaqua. Pa., from 1928 to 1942. He 
served in the Army Dental Corps 1942- 
1946, with assignments in the European, 
African and Middle Eastern Theatres. 
On his separation, with the rank of 
Major, Dr. Zerdesky began practice in 
New Philadelphia. He was a member 
of Psi Omega and the Gorgas Odont- 
ological Society. Among his survivors 
is a brother. Dr. Alfonce W. Zerdy. '37. 

DR. JOHN J. FITZPATRICK 

Dr. John J. Fitzpatrick. '12 (B.C.D.S.). 
of Boston, Mass., died on December 
26. Dr. Fitzpatrick was a member of 
Psi Omega. 

DR. CLAY W. LEPS 

Dr. Clay Whitehill Leps, '09 (B.C.D.S.). 
of Charles Town, W. Va., died on 
January 28. A native of Keyser, W. 
Va., Dr. Leps had practiced there for 
a brief period before removing to 
Charles Town. He was a member of 
Psi Omega. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. 
Ethel M. Leps; a daughter, Mrs. Harold 
Barr; and two sons: Clay W. Jr. and 
George Edwin III — all of Charles 
Town. 

DR. HOWARD C. GREENE 

Dr. Howard Crosby Greene, 'II ( U. of 
Md.) died recently. He was a member 
of Psi Omega. Before his retirement. 
Dr. Greene had practiced in Hartford. 
Conn. 



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WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
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MAY-JUNE. 1958 



63 



Acme Iron Works 

E. S. Adkins 48 

Advertisers Engraving Company SO 

Alcazar 57 

Alliance Plumbing & Heating Company 31 

American Disinfectant Company 26 

American Office Equipment Co., lnc 52 

American Telephone & Telegraph Company 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Products (Anchor Fence) 28 

Arcade Pontiac Company 28 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Association 54 

F. G. Arwood & Co., Inc 46 

Alvin L. Aubinoe Outside Back Cover 

B & B Exterminator Co., lnc 54 

Baltimore Asphalt Block & Tile Co 57 

Baltimore Business Forms 56 

Baltimore Envelope Co 37 

Bank of Crisfield 49 

Bank of Maryland 38 

Bard-Avon School 43 

The Barn 50 

Bartlett Real Estate 30 

(823) Bavarian Restaurant 62 

Jeanette Beck, lnc 35 

C. J. Benson Furniture Co 52 

Berymann's Laundry 47 

Henry O. Berman Co., Inc 59 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 41 

Bornmann-Pattyson Opticians, Inc 42 

Harry A. Boswell Co 62 

F. S. Bowen Electrical Contractor 37 

Brass & Copper Supply Co., Inc 52 

Brentwood Inn 54 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 31 

Briggs Meat Product Co 46 

Buck Glass Company 54 

The Captain's Table 36 

Carey Machinery & Supply Co 37 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 44 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 52 

Chaney's Garage 45 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 44 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 22 

Conn & Bock Company 48 

Cokesbury Book Store 36 

Colony Press 57 

Colson Merriam 53 

Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Assn 63 

Wm. Cook Funeral Homes 56 

Cooperative Dental Laboratory 39 

A. Myron Cowell, Inc 45 

Criss Brothers & Co 44 

George Bert Cropper, Contractor 49 

Crosse & Blackwell Co 27 

Crout, Snyder & Crandall 61 

Crown Oil & Wax Company 40 

Crusty Pie Company 39 

Cullen Photo Company 36 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 46 

Jack Daniels Buick. Inc 39 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 58 

F. A. Davis & Sons 60 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters. Inc 38 

Del-Haven White House Motel 50 

J. H. DeVcau & Sons, Inc 31 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc 40 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 51 

Drummond & Company, Inc 61 

Norman S. Earley & Son 40 

Eastern Shore Steel Company 49 

Electronic Wholesalers, Inc 45 

i mbassy Dairy 41 

C. F.ngels & Sons 42 

Ted Englchardt, Architect 26 

Frank M. Ewing Co., Inc 44 

Fabricator's Steel Corp 42 

Farmers Cooperative Association 40 

J. H. filbert. Inc 51 



Directory of Advertisers 



First Federal Savings <fc Loan Association.... 28 

Leland L. Fisher 51 

Francis & Parsons 31 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn 56 

Frederick Underwriters. Inc 40 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 38 

Garamond Press 53 

S. A. Gatti & Son, Inc 27 

Henry B. Gilpin Company 58 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co., Inc 58 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 55 

J. E. Greiner Company 61 

M. J. Grove Lime Company 40 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 55 

Hannes Formal Wear 42 

Harford Metal Products, Inc 53 

Harrington Hotel 63 

Harrison Hall Hotel 33 

Hedin House Hotel 31 

Hendler's Ice Cream 50 

Hillyard Sales Co 29 

Hitt's Electrical Service, Inc 46 

Robert F. HofF 42 

The Hoffberger Company 56 

Henry Powell Hopkins. Architect 43 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

George Hyman Construction Co 25 

In Town Motor Hotels 42 



Eddie Jacobs 

Johannes & Murray . . . 
Johnston. Lemon & Co. 



E. A. Kaestner Company 

N. E. Kefauver. Jr 

James D. Kemper Co 

Francis Scott Key Hotel 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 

King Bros., Inc., Printing 

Kingsville Inn 

Earle Kirkley, Inc 

E. H. Koester Bakery Company . 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 

Kramer Hardware & Supply Co. 
Woodrow H. Kratz 



LaGrande Hotel-Bob Ching Restaurant 

Lamar & Wallace 

Lankford Hotel 

Lawyers Title Company of Prince Georges 

Co., Inc 

Maurice Leeser Company 

Lord Calvert Hotel 

Loveless Electric Co 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 



G. B. Macke Corp 

M & G Armature & Generator Service, Inc. 

Mangels. Herold Co., Inc 

Maria's Restaurant 

Maridel Motel 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 

Maryland-Virginia Realty Co., Inc 

Mason Canning Company 

Masser's Motel & Restaurant 

Mayor & City Council of Ocean City. Md. 

Meadowgold Ice Cream Co 

Metropolitan Tourist Co 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assn. . . . 

Miller Chemical Company 

Mischanton's Restaurant 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., lnc 

Modern Machinist Co 

Modern Stationery Co 

Moon Palace 

Morrison & Bready, lnc 

Murray-Baumgartner Co 

Myers & Quigg. Inc 



John J. & F. Rowland McGinity 
McLeod & Romborg Stone Co. . . 
McNeil] Surveys. Inc 



58 
62 

27 

55 
30 
28 
40 
29 
52 
53 
36 
58 
59 
46 
56 

33 
41 
33 

37 
59 
41 
42 
38 

41 
61 
55 
24 
33 
52 
32 
49 
30 
32 
47 
57 
53 
52 
34 
50 
39 
50 
35 
25 
57 
43 

56 
39 
44 



National Bank of Cambridge 48 

National Equipment & Supply Co 63 

Norman Motor Co 29 

North Washington Press. Inc 44 

C. C. Oliphant 49 

Oles Envelope Corp 51 

Olney Inn 26 

Occidental Restaurant 35 

Palmer Ford. Inc 62 

Park Transfer Co 62 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors, Inc 61 

R. B. Phelps Stone Co 62 

Place Vendome — Rive Gauche 34 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 27 

James Posey & Associates 54 

Quick Service Laundry 44 

Refrigeration Supply Co 44 

Restorff Motors 26 

Rex Engraving Co.. lnc 37 

Roberts Cambridge Shipyard, Inc 36 

Rocco's Charcoal House 28 

Roche & Hull, Inc 59 

Roma Restaurant 58 

Roosevelt Hotel 33 

Rose Exterminator Co 50 

Salisbury Milling Co 48 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 57 

W. M. Schoenfelder & Associates 29 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) 60 

A. F. Schwerd Mfg. Co 23 

Seaside Motel 33 

Seidenspinner. Realtor 63 

The Shade Shop 34 

George C. Shaffer, Inc 38 

Shore Distributors 48 

Shoreham Hotel 29 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 47 

A. W. Sisk & Co 48 

Russell W. Smith, Insurance 52 

Southeastern Floor Co 29 

Southern Oxygen Co 27 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 49 

Standard Art, Marble & Tile Co 23 

Standard Engineering Co 30 

Star Baking Company 42 

Wm. P. Stein, Inc 36 

Stowaway Motel 32 

Sturdee Metal Products Co 60 

Suburban Supply, Inc 62 

Suburban Trust Co 26 

Mano Swartz 34 

Sweetheart Bakers 30 

Thomas Distributing Co 40 

Thomsson Steel Co 25 

Wm. J. Tickner & Sons. Inc 60 

Tool & Supply Co., Inc 46 

Trailer Village 24 

University Book Store 24 

James T. Vernay & Sons Co 60 

Paul J. Vincent Co 60 

Wallop & Son. Insurance 41 

Walton & Madden 45 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works. Inc.. 27 

George Washington Hotel 32 

Washington Ply-Rite Co 47 

Washington Refrigeration Co 25 

J. I. Wells Co., Inc 48 

Westchester Dining Room 35 

White Rice Inn 51 

Perry O. Wilkinson 50 

Carl J. Williams & Sons 49 

W. R. Winslow Company 26 

E. Randolph Wootton & Co 55 

The Wrought Iron Shop 63 

C. O. Wurzberger & Sons 55 

Wye Plantation 48 

York Building Products Co., Inc 30 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



FOOTBALL TICKETS 



NOW AVAILABLE 



By tradition. University Alumni arc given first choice of tickets 
for each season s football games. Your application for individual 

game or season tickets will be processed speedily. Preference to 
Alumni applications ends August 31. Applications will be 
processed in order of their receipt. 

Price of individual home games is $4.00 . . . all seats reserved. 
Season s tickets for four home games are $16.00 . . . all seats reserved. 





1958 


Schedule 


HOME 




AWAY 


Clemson ( Band Day ) 


Oct. 4 


Wake Forest (at Winston-Salem) Sept. 20 


Texas A & M (Parents' Day! 


Oct. 11 


North Carolina State ( at Raleigh ) Sept. 27 


South Carolina (Homecoming) 


Nov. 1 


North Carolina (at Chapel Hill) Oct. 18 


Navy (at Baltimore) 

■ 


Nov. 8 


Auburn (at Auburn) Oct. 25 

Miami (at Miami. Fla. ) Nov. 14 
Virginia (at Charlottesville) Nov. 22 


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WASHINGTON, D. C. HUdson 






Volume XXIX • Number 5 
July-August • 1958 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Alumni Publication of the 



University of Maryland 




In This Issue: 1958 Commencemeni Exercises 

\i umni President's \\m \\ Repori 

N< IKM NKSIIII'S \ I I III l \i\ I KM I ^ 



NOW OPEN 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GOLF COURSE and DRIVING RANGE 



1 he University of Maryland proudly announces the opening 
of a new 1 8 hole golf course on the College Park campus. 
Formal dedication will come in early October but play began 
on the first nine holes on July I, 1958. The second nine will 
open about September I. 

Memberships on a family and individual basis are avail- 
able to Alumni. Faculty and Students. Any active (dues 
paying) alumnus may make immediate application for Golf 
Course Membership. Individual membership is $20.00 for 
the year July 1, 1958 to June 30. 1959. Family membership 



(husband, wife and dependent children) is $30.00. 

Guests of alumni members will be entitled to use the 
facilities when accompanied by the alumnus. 

Complete details and a sketch of the course are available 
on request. Address your inquiry to P. O. Box 295, College 
Park. Md. 

Plan now to take advantage of this great, new facility. Both 
the Golf Course and the Driving Range are now open and 
waiting for you to play. Let this be your center for pleasure 
and relaxation at any time. 



FORMAL DEDICATION IS SCHEDULED FOR EARLY OC TOBER 





\uovi : East entrance front freeway Md. 193, showing all front side holes, l EFT: Coif 
Director Frank (renin tests sixth green. 



Maryland 




( OYER: 

This excellent photograph oj the 1958 Commencement I tercises shows th, 
principal speaker, Dr. Milton Eisenhower, addressing the vast audience I In 
photograph was taken by Al Danegger, Hen, I l niversit) Photographit 

Laboratory. 



the 



Maryland 



JULY AUGUST • 1958 



magazine 



Volume XXIX 



Number 5 



Alumni Publication of 
the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
EDMUND S. BURKE, Assistant Treasurer 
ALVIN L. AUBINOE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWING TUTTLE 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFIC ERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

JOSEPH H. DECKMAN, '31, President 
FRANK BLOCK, '24, Vice-President 
MISS FLORA STREETT, '38, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018; (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue — 



FEATURES 



2 

4 

6 

10 

12 

15 



NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 







Photograph Credits 


Cover 


: Al Danegger. Head, Photo- 






graphic Laboratory 


P- 


4: 


James Coulson. Diamondhack 


P- 


5: 


Staff 


P- 


6: 


Staff 


P- 


7: 


Staff 


P- 


8: 


Top: European Division. Stars 

and Stripes 

Bottom: Werner Severin 

(Staff) 


P- 


9: 


Werner Severin (Staff) 


P- 


10: 


Al Danegger (Staff) 


P- 


11: 


I. to r. first two, Victor 
Holm; Al Danegger; Victor 
Holm 


P- 


13: 


Werner Severin (Staff) 


P- 


15: 


Staff 


P- 


17: 


Staff 


P- 


18: 


Staff 


P. 


19: 


Werner Severin (Staff) 



20 

21 

23 
24 
27 
35 
37 
39 
45 
46 
49 

50 

51 

56 



Alumni Diary 

Campus Notes 

1958 Commencement Exercises 

Alumni President's Annual Report 

Scholarships at the University of Maryland 

University Sports 

News from the Clubs 



Agriculture 

Air Science 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 

Education 

Engineering 

Home Economics 

Law 

Medicine 

Pharmacy 

Special and Continuation Studies 



Social Notes 
Completed Careers 



Index of Advertisers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3. 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council: 

fSchool and College Representatives) 

AGRICULTURE 

Theodore L. Bissell. "20 
Arthur B. Hamilton, '29 
Clayton Reynolds, '22 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

W. Gilbert Dent, Jr.. "26 
Charles R. Merrick, '26 
Ralph G. Shure, "32 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42 
Alvin S. Klein. '37 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 

DENTAL 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene D. Lyon, '38 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, '22 

EDUCATION 

Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 
Judson Bell. '41 
Harry Hasslinger. '33 

ENGINEERING 

Joseph H. Deckman, '31 
Charles R. Hayleck, '43 
Howard L. Keller, '43 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt-Kricker, '31 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 

LAW 

Layman J. Redden. '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Benjamin B. Rosenstock, '25 

MEDICAL 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

N URSING 

Mrs. Evelyn Koontz Musavi, '53 
Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 
Mrs. Norma Fuller Yeager. '48 

PHARMACY 

Frank Block, '24 
Norman J. Levin, '38 
Gordon Mouat, '37 



Ex-Officio Members of the 
Council: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 
Baltimore — 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — H. Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, "37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '39 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York— Hal McGay. '50 
Overseas — Col. Edward J. Fletcher, '37 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges — Thomas R. Brooks, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 

I s. Dept. of Agriculture. Alumni Club- 
William H. Fvans. '2f> 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

Several bits of philosophy ring in our ears as we come to the close of one 
alumni year and set our sights toward another which may well be even more 
fruitful. First, there was the sage who said. "We cannot do everything at once, 
but we can do something at once." There is also the statement that strangers are 
friends who have not yet met. How true this is of the many alumni who meet 
for the first time on the common ground of alumni interest and University 
loyalty. The third is the statement of an English school teacher in India who 
said to a man who stood at the gate of a new year, "Give me a light that I may 
tread into the darkness ahead." 

The 1957-1958 alumni year has been one of great decision, of increased devo- 
tion and dedication, and the firm foundation upon which future participation and 
effort will be centered. Two great strides have been taken by the University in 
the completion and dedication of a fine library at College Park and in the breaking 
of ground for the long-sought Student Union in Baltimore. At the same time, 
the Alumni Association took steps to draft and adopt broad policy measures 
which now give definite direction to alumni purpose and performance. The 
theme of service to the University and the recognition of strong interest in the 
total University as well as in the individual Schools and Colleges runs through 
the entire blueprint. The President's message, contained in this issue of Mary- 
land, presents vividly the important measures achieved in one of the most 
fruitful of alumni years. More alumni than ever before in the history of the 
University have given of their time to suggest, to build and to serve in many 
capacities. Few people know of the terrific effort which has gone into the alumni 
portion of the Greater University Fund. Hardly anyone could know the behind- 
the-scenes contribution of Officers and Committees of the eleven School and 
College alumni organizations, more than fourteen alumni clubs and the individual 
constructive planning and advice from all segments of our alumni world. 

There has been give and take aplenty, but with it all there has been an intense 
desire to improve, to challenge and to serve. How we would like to record all of 
the events of the past year. These events embrace literally thousands of ideas and 
of individuals. The premise upon which we started was that the University of 
Maryland is good. The goal we set for ourselves was that the University can 
be made better but only through sincere effort of the alumni in cooperation with 
those in whose hands direct responsibility has been placed. 

Fresh in our minds are the reunions which brought old friends together and 
which made new acquaintances possible. Gatherings of fifty, fifty-five and sixty 
year classes saw better participation and keener interest combined with practical 
wishes to express appreciation for a contribution made by the University to the 
path of life which each had travelled. Not the least of this fine period was the 
graduation of more than 2,500 new alumni. Their presence in a body for the 
last time focused attention on the great size and strength of the University and 
on the rapidly expanding alumni structure. No longer are we small. We have, 
however, done our best to hold the warmth of intimate relationship as a corner- 
stone to alumni progress. As we say good-bye to the Class of 1958 from a student 
viewpoint we open wide the door of alumni participation and say that their 
ability may well carry us to heights yet untouched. A man feels humble in 
appreciation to all who have done so much and in the face of the magnitude and 
challenge of the future. The assurance of past alumni devotion is the light that 
will carry us into the darkness ahead and ever forward. 

As ever. 




David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Well, perhaps, if you want to be strictly literal 

And yet, when she reaches college age will she be too 

late? Too late to get the kind of higher education 

so vital to her future and to the future of her country? 

It all depends. 

There is in the United States today a growing threat to 
the ability of our colleges to produce thinking, well- 
informed graduates. That threat is composed of several 
elements: an inadequate salary scale that is 
steadily reducing the number of qualified people who 
choose college teaching as a career; classrooms and 
laboratories already overcrowded ; and a pressure for 
enrollment that will double by 1967. 

The effects of these shortcomings can become extremely 
serious. Never in our history has the need for educated 
leadership been so acute. The problems of business, 
government and science grow relentlessly more complex, 
the body of knowledge more mountainous. 
The capacity of our colleges— all colleges— 
to meet these challenges is essential not only 
to the cultural development of our children but 
to the intellectual stature of our nation. 

In a very real sense, our personal and national progress 

depends on our colleges. They must have more support 

in keeping pace with their increasing importance to society. 

Help the colleges or universities of your choice. Help them 
plan for stronger faculties and expansion. The returns 
will be greater than you think. 



If you want to know what the college 
crisis means to you, write for a free 
booklet to: HIGHER EDUCATION, 
Box 36, Times Square Station, New 
York 36, New York. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 





Sponsored as a public service, in cooperation with, the Council for Finayicial Aid to Education 




JULY-AUGUST. 1958 




CAMPUS NOTES 



JOHN FEY, LAW "40, APPOINTED TO 

PRESIDENCY OF UNIVERSITY OF 

VERMONT 

John T. Fey. a 1940 graduate of the 
School of Law, and former Clerk of the 
United States Supreme Court, was re- 
cently elected by the Board of Trustees 
of the University of Vermont and State 
Agricultural College to succeed Dr. 
Carl W. Borgmann as President of the 
University, effective July 1 . 

Mr. Fey attended high school in 
Cumberland, Maryland. He completed 
undergraduate work at Washington and 
Lee University. He received the LL.B. 
degree from the University of Mary- 
land, and was awarded the Master of 
Business Administration degree by 
Harvard University. 

He has served as Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court since July, 1956, when he 
was appointed to the post by Chief 
Justice Earl Warren. He was the twelfth 
clerk to serve the Court since February, 
1790. 

Mr. Fey practiced law in Cumber- 
land. He served from 1946 to 1950 in 
the Maryland Legislature as a Republi- 
can member of the House of Delegates, 
and was also attorney to the Allegany 
County Board of Commissioners. He 
was appointed to the faculty at George 
Washington University as Associate 
Professor of Law in 1949. 

In 1952, Yale University awarded 
him the degree of Doctor of Juridical 
Science for his work in the field of 
taxation. 

He was named Acting Dean of the 
George Washington University Law 
School in June, 1953, and Dean in Oc- 
tober of that year. He currently teaches 
Federal Income Taxation, Real Prop- 
erty, and Legal Accounting as a Pro- 
fessor of Law on the part-time faculty 




President Elkins was recently initiated into the Pershing Rifles. Here he is shown 
accepting the certificate which made him an honorary Pershing Rifleman. Dr. Elkins, 
explained that he felt that basic ROTC is one of the finest services offered at the Univer- 
sity and that it contributes a great deal to the welfare of the individual. 



of George Washington. 

Mr. Fey is a member of the District 
of Columbia Bar, the Maryland Bar, 
the Federal Bar Association, and the 
American Bar Association. 

President Borgmann, in commenting 
on Mr. Fey's appointment, said, "I am 
very much pleased with [the] decision. 
I believe John Fey's appointment is an 
excellent promise for the continued 
growth and quality of the University." 



NEW EDUCATIONAL INCENTIVE PROGRAM 
ESTABLISHED BY ALVIN L. AUBINOE 

A new educational incentive student 
aid program, combining both loan and 
scholarship features, has been estab- 



lished at the University by Alvin L. 
Aubinoe. Engineering '26, and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Regents. 

Under the plan, a student will re- 
ceive $500, one half of which will be 
awarded as an outright scholarship and 
the other half made repayable to the 
University over a five-year period. The 
program is aimed at aiding worthy stu- 
dents to prepare for careers in civil en- 
gineering, architecture, or light con- 
struction. 

Students will be eligible beginning in 
their freshman year. Following initial 
receipt of the award, a student will 
continue to receive aid through to 
graduation, providing, of course, that 
he remains in good academic standing. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



U N I V E R S I T Y CALEM)\R < > I ACTIVITIES 



JULY 

7-August 1 Cosmelolog\ I 11 s I i I u I c . 
Skinner Building, College Park. 

13-16 P.T.A. Summer Workshop for 
Parents and Teachers to discuss 
special problems, Student I Dion. 
College Park. 

14-August 1 Special Fdueation Work- 
shop, Student Union, College 
Park. 

15-16 Fire Service Hydraulics. Exten- 
sion Service Building, College 
Park. Fire Extension Service 
program for Maryland firemen. 

21 -August 15 Traffic Institute. Student 
Union. College Park. In-service 
training program for supervisors 
of police traffic departments. 

28-AugUSt 2 International Congress on 
Home Economics, Armory and 
Classrooms Building, College 
Park. Program to promote the 
development of Home Economics 
Education in all countries. 

AUGUST 

1 Close of Summer Session. 
4-9 4-H Club Week. College Park. 
This program brings 4-H Club 
members onto the campus for a 



south leadership training pro 
gram. 
4-(< I ireman Vrial I adder, I (tension 
Service Building. College Park 
A demonstration and training 

program practice in anal laddei 

performance. 
12 state Home Demonstration stall 
( onference, Symons Hall, < ollege 
Park. 

SEPT1 MBEB 

2-5 Fireman's Short Course, College 

Park. In-service training program 

for lire Department ol Maryland. 

10-12 Water and Sewage Conference, 

Student Union. College Park. 
Poultrj Service Men's Confer- 
ence,, Central Auditorium, col- 
lege Park. 

Fall Semester Registration, ( ol- 
lege Park. 

I ootball. Wake I ores! al Win- 
ston-Salem, North Carolina. 
Instruction begins. College Park. 
Football. North Carolina Slate at 
Raleiim. North Carolina. 



ii-i: 

15-1! 

20 

22 

27 



io State Poultrj and \ egetablc i 

ing c ontest, c ollc P 
ll Football 

lege Park 
is I ootball, North < arolina al 

c hapel Hill. North ( arolina 

2s I OOtball, \iihiiin al \nl 

Alabama 
2K- ' I I amilj I conomics w 
c ollege Paik. 

\()\ I Mlil i< 



26 



l ootball, South < arolina -it < ol 
lege Park 

I ootball, Vi\ j ..I Baltimore 
I ootball, Miami al Miami 

I loi ul.i 

l ootball, Virginia al c harl< 

ville, Virginia 

rhanksgiving Recess begins aftei 

lasl class. 



OCTOBER 

4 Foot ha 1 
Park. 



Clemson at College 



DEC! MB1 K 

1 rhanksgiving Recess ends. 

20 Christmas Recess begins aftei last 
class. 

JANUARY 

5 Christmas Recess ends. 

21 Pre-Fxamination Stud) Day. 
22-28 Firsi Semestei examinations. 



MR. PANGBORN RECEIVES 
HONORARY DEGREE FROM LOYOLA 

Mr. Thomas W. Pangborn, of the Uni- 
versity's Board of Regents, was one of 
two persons awarded honorary degrees 
June 8 from Loyola College. Mr. Pang- 
born received a Doctor of Science 
degree. 

Mr. Pangborn is one of America's 
leading Catholic laymen. He was made 
a Knight of Malta and a Grand Knight 
of the Holy Sepulchre by Pope Pius 
XII. 

Because of his life-long interest in 
Catholic higher education, he has re- 
ceived numerous citations including 
honorary degrees from the Catholic 
University of America, the University 
of Notre Dame and Mount St. Mary's. 

NEW HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF 
CIVIL ENGINEERING, APPOINTED 

Dr. Charles T. G. Looney has recently 
joined the staff in the College of En- 
gineering as Head of the Department of 
Civil Engineering. 

Born in Liverpool, England, and now 
a United States citizen. Dr. Looney was 
awarded a B. S. degree by the Carnegie 
Institute of Technology in 1932. an 
M. S. in C. E. by the University of 
Illinois in 1934, and a Ph. D. in En- 
gineering by the latter named institution 
in 1940. He has taught at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina and the Univer- 
sity of Iowa, and from 1946 until his 
(Continued on page 17) 

JULY-AUGUST, 1958 




1958 

Commencement 

Exercises 



Thh university officially closed academic year 1957-58 
with the presentation of 2,549 degrees on June 7. 1958. 
Witnessing the Commencement ceremonies, which took place 
in the Cole Activities Building, were nearly 12,000 parents 
and friends of the degree candidates. The number graduating 
was only slightly more than 300 short of the record 1951 
graduating class and was close to 400 more than last year. 

Present and taking part in the Commencement ceremonies 
were His Excellency Theodore R. McKeldin. Governor of the 
State of Maryland, and Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower, President 
of The Johns Hopkins University. 

Following the academic processional. The Reverend Harry 
S. Cobey of All Saint's Episcopal Church, Hamlet, North 
Carolina, delivered the Invocation. Mr. Cobey was a mem- 
ber of the graduating class of 1911 and the uncle of W. W. 
Cobey, Director of Athletics. Another Cobey, Mary Pat. 
received her degree in this year's exercises. 

For those about to go out into the world on their own, the 
keynote of this year's Commencement, appropriately enough, 
concerned the world, the graduates' place in it and the con- 
flicts which they must be aware of and be able to face. 

{Continued on page 8) 



DEGREES CONFERRED 
JUNE 7. 1958 
(Tentative Count) 

llll GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ph. D 85 

Ed. D 17 

M. A 58 

M. S 95 

M. Ed 116 

M. B. A 7 

M. F. S 3 

Total 381 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 78 

THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 109 

THE SCHOOL OF LAW 73 

Certificate of Proficiency 1 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 91 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Bachelor of Arts 262 

Bachelor of Science 130 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMIN 299 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Bachelor of A its 51 

Bachelor of Science 204 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 1 68 

THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 54 

THE COLLEGE OF MILITARY SCIENCE 444 

THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 60 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 49 

THE COLLEGE OF P.E., REC. & HEALTH 54 

THE COLLEGE OF SPECIAL AND CONTINUATION STUDIES. 41 

Grand Total 2.549 




Honorary degrees awarded to 



. . . Dr. Eisenhower 
The Hon. Judge Soper 





. . . Dr. Malcolm 
. . . Dr. Swain 





I 



'■ M 









-- -i ife 



an empty classroom 



- - ^gdfrV, 



i; deserted i ampus 




n l\ tli mi/ tine 1 1 1 th ■ 



Scenes 

of 

Commencement 





/asf minute diploma counters 



rally before the march-in 




the ceremonial 



I. . . families seeking their own 







. for posterity 




innl the long, thoughtful 

wiilk home 




Governor Theodore R. McKcldin. who was also present at 
Commencement ceremonies in Heidelberg, Germany, in ex- 
tending greetings, stressed the importance of the Universin's 
Overseas Program. He stated. ""I have recently returned from 
a fairlj extensive tour of Europe and whereever I went I was 
received with respect and warm good-will as soon as it was 
known that I am the Governor of the State that sponsors the 
University of Maryland: for Maryland is a name that the 
Europeans associate, not with wealth and power, but with 
love of learning. . . 

"... for all men know that if we ever achieve a comity 
of nations on this earth, it will be through the power of 
thought, not by force of arms. And all men, in every land, 
who set reason and justice above wealth and power, are 
fellow-citizens of a community that has no frontier, and no 
ambition to push forward any boundary except the boundary 
of human knowledge. 

"We are associated with this concept in the minds of 
Europeans because they know us largely, if not entirely, 
through the work of the University of Maryland. . . 

" . . . . the people of Maryland owe an immense debt to 
the University for their wealth and health and happiness; 
but I doubt that any of the institution's activities have con- 
tributed more to the honor of the State than its work abroad. 
For that work has had the effect of linking the name of our 
State with the concepts of reason and justice; and such an 
association is as honorable as any that a commonwealth can 
acquire. 

"For bringing this gracious gift to the State of Maryland, 
I am happy to pay tribute to the University today." 

Greetings were also brought to the gathering by Mr. Ed- 
ward F. Holter, Vice Chairman of the Board of Regents. 



The principal address for the 1958 commencement was 
delivered by Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower. Dr. Eisenhower is 
known throughout the world for his work in government and 
in education. He is a member of the President's Committee 
on Governmental Organization, special ambassador and the 
President's personal representative on Latin American Affairs. 
Director of the Fund for Adult Education, and Chairman of 
the Committee on Government and Higher Education. 

Prior to his appointment at The Johns Hopkins University 
in 1956 Dr. Eisenhower served as President of Pennsylvania 
State University. 

His address, "Ideas in Conflict: Freedom vs. Communism," 
described the ideological battle between communism and 
democracy based on the Judaic-Christian way of life. Dr. 
Eisenhower emphasized four of the great moral issues which 
divide the free and the Communist worlds. He spoke first 
of the status of the individual. 

"... It is on the conviction that men are children of God 
that the free nations of the West have built social, economic, 
and political institutions which protect the dignity of the 
individual and promote mutuality in human relations. 

"Communism holds that men are creatures of material 
forces; that life has only such meaning as is ordained by the 
party or state; and that man has no God-given "natural 
rights.' " 

He pointed out as the second of the major issues the 
opposite views of history held by the communistic and the 
Judaic-Christian philosophies. 

in our view, ideas determine history. Men. thinking and 
acting for themselves, are capable of altering the course of 
history. We see the world, not as the sum of things that 
are. but as the sum of things as they should be. Our eyes are 
on the stars, and the limitless reservoirs of our minds are 




Dr. Elkins congratulates David K. E. Bruce, U. S. Ambas- 
sador to the German Federal Republic, after awarding him 
the degree of Honorary Doctor of Laws. Dr. Ray Ehrens- 
berger. Dean of the College of Special and Continuation 
Studies, looks on. 




Dr. Daniel E. Shehan '22 (L.), President of the School of 
Dentistry Alumni Association, Presents 1958 Distinguished 
Alumni Award to Dr. Prank J. Houghton '17 (R.), Dean of 
Loyola (New Orleans) University School of Dentistry. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 








above: Medical School pre-Com- 
mencement ceremony with the School 

of Nursing dice Club. 



LEFT: Dr. Thomas B. Turner, '25. 
Dean of the Johns Hopkins University 

School of Medicine, addresses the 
Scientific Session of the alumni of the 

University's Medical School. June 5. 



RIGHT." Westinghouse Air Arm Divi- 
sion Scholarship holders. Left to right: 
Benjamin Hoffman, '59; Kenneth Mc- 
Auliffe, '60; Seth Bonder, '61. this 
year's winner. Professor Russell B. 
Allen. Assistant Dean of the College 
of Engineering is at the far right. 




1 



constantly yielding more challenging ideas, greater standards 
of perfection and higher ideals. . . 

"... In contrast. Communist dogma sternly dictates that 
history is shaped by economic forces; that it is impossible 
for men to change these forces; and that Communists have 
been preordained to 'assist' these forces toward their in- 
evitable goal: the 'classless society.' . . . 

' . . . Thus, in the Marxist scheme of things, there is 
nothing beyond the social order." 

Dr. Eisenhower continued. 'A third area of moral con- 
flict lies in the Communist versus the Judaic-Christian attitude 
toward means and ends. 

It is the Judaic-Christian conviction that the means to any 
end, even the most laudable, must be in conformity with 
certain moral standards. The end does not justify the 
means. . . 

' . . . Against this gentle doctrine. Communism pits a 
philosophy based on the idea that the end does justify the 
means and that Communists are therefore duty-bound to use 
any means to accomplish their objective." 

As the fourth major ideological point of conflict. Dr. 
Eisenhower named our concept of a Supreme Being as 
opposed to the Communist atheistic doctrine. 



Dr. Eisenhower concluded his remarks b\ saving. "In the 
modern ideological struggle, each free individual must. b\ 
achieving nobility and strength of character within himself, 
contribute to the spiritual strength of the nation. In the long 
course of history, this strength will be decisive. And with 
the strength given to men who bear witness to their faith 
will come the patience, the stamina, the wisdom, and the 
courage to build, in partnership with our allies, a world ot 
freedom, and justice, and lasting peace." 

Dl<. EISENHOWER WAS ONE OF FOUR WHO RECEIVED IIONOR- 

ary degrees from the University. He was presented a Doctor 
of Laws degree. Honorary Doctor of Laws was also con- 
ferred upon Dr. Wilbur A. Malcolm, President of the Amer- 
ican Cyanamid Company. Dr. Robert I . Swain, former Presi- 
dent of the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
cation and present Editor of Drug Topics and Drug hade 
News received a Doctor of Science degree. A Doctor of I aws 
degree was presented to the Honorable Morris A. Soper. 
Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit 
Honorary certificates of Merit Award in Agriculture were 

(Continued on page /Vi 



JULY-AUGUST. 1958 




Mr. Deckman 



Generally speaking, an annual re- 
port is a thing to be dreaded by both 
the writer and those who must endure 
the detail it contains. In this case, how- 
ever, it is our feeling that the record 
of the past year is the result of team 
effort and is one of which every mem- 
ber can be proud. In accordance with 
excellent committee preparation and 
presentation, the Alumni Council ap- 
proved and adopted policy recommen- 
dations which will serve as a guide for 
future alumni activity and development. 
Many of these recommendations are 
already in effect; others are being es- 
tablished rapidly. This policy calls for 
the establishment of a basic pride in the 
total University, while at the same time, 
recognizing individual school attach- 
ments and loyalties. The prime pur- 
pose of an Alumni Association was es- 
tablished as the enhancement of the 
University and assurance for its ob- 
jectives and the promoting of its aims. 
Both the University administration and 
the Alumni Council have agreed to 
establish lines of service and jurisdic- 
tion. Alumni will only undertake those 
programs in which they should have a 
helpful interest. At the same time, 
recognition has been recorded this ever- 
changing nature of the University and 
the fact that a progressive and flexible 



alumni effort must not be fettered b\ 
rigid policy directives. 

In a review of this kind, it is dif- 
ficult to give proper credit to the many 
whose tireless efforts have assured this 
great degree of success. It is likewise 
difficult to draw a clear-cut line and 
say that the University did certain 
things for the Alumni Association or 
that the alumni themselves were re- 
sponsible for certain other achieve- 
ments. To avoid any mistakes of this 
kind, we would proudly report accom- 
plishments, being careful to give credit 
to the University administration, to the 
membership of the General Alumni 
Council, to the Officers of the Alumni 
Association, and to the many who have 
contributed toward any of the follow- 
ing: 

First, a General Alumni Fund has 
been established and over $100,000 has 
been received or pledged for the Stu- 
dent Union in Baltimore, for scholar- 
ships, a heritage fund, and for a special 
historical library program. 

Second, approximately $3,200 was 
again provided by the Alumni Council 
in direct scholarship aid to students at- 
tending eleven of the Schools and Col- 
leges of the University. 

Third, responsibility for editing and 
financing the alumni publication The 
Maryland Magazine, was turned over 
to the University. In this connection, 
a three-year contract was signed be- 
tween the University and the Advertis- 
ing Director for this publication. It was 
further agreed that profits from the 
publication would be used to provide 
a Field Secretary for the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and to assist in expanding the 
base of our organization. 

I am happy to report that a Field 
Secretary is now at work and that a 
number of new geographical clubs are 
in the organizational stage. Initial ef- 
forts are being directed to the District 
of Columbia, and Montgomery. Wash- 
ington, Hartford, and the Eastern 
Shore Counties. As they develop. Coun- 
cil representation will be accorded these 
clubs and they will join the twelve 
clubs which are already on an active 
basis. During the year, new life and 



Alumni 

President's 

Annual 

Report 



new effort came to the Alleghany-Gar- 
rett Club and to New York. The De- 
partment of Agriculture and Journalism 
Alumni Clubs were activated. A Dental 
Alumni Club was formed in Rhode 
Island, and a Pharmacy Club is under 
consideration in New Jersey. Inquiry 
has been received from Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina. The Alumni 
Clubs program may well be the top 
alumni effort of the coming year. 

Subscriptions to the alumni magazine 
have shown a steady rise and have run 
a little ahead of previous years. We are 
still far from satisfactory support in 
this connection, but have hopes that an 
intensive subscription campaign held in 
advance during the first six months of 
the year will bear real fruit. 

For a number of years, alumni have 
served on committees to encourage and 
expedite the Baltimore Student Union 
project. The bids have now been let 
and this facility will soon be a reality. 
In behalf of the Alumni Association, 
the General Alumni Council authorized 
the sum of $6,600 for furnishing an 
alumni area in the Union Building. 

For the first time, a genuine 
effort was made prior to Commence- 
ment to meet with all the members of 
the graduating class and to provide each 



10 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



a copy of the alumni publication. The 
Maryland Magazine. The Alumni- 
Faculty-Student Relations Committee 
planned this effort and both they and 
the active participants who cooperated 
in this venture are to be commended. 
Other actions and the committees which 
brought them to fruition also deserve 
recognition here. A petition has been 
presented to the State Legislature from 
the Alumni Council requesting an 
amendment to the law which would re- 
quire that at least fifty per cent of the 
members of the Board of Regents 
would be University of Maryland 
alumni. The Scholarship Committee 
has established a Loan Fund of $2,000 
for needy and deserving students. Ini- 
tial plans have been made to recognize 
all Past Presidents of the University 
Alumni Association. The Constitution 
and By-Laws have been amended to 
grant voting privileges to the three im- 
mediate Past Presidents, to permit 
amendments by a two-thirds vote of 
members present at any regularly 
called meeting and to establish a one 
year term for the Council President. 
Plans were made to develop an alumni 
budget on a Fiscal Year and functional 
basis. This will be designed to main- 
tain an operating reserve of $20,000. 
In addition, appropriate settlement was 
made of Maryland Magazine accounts 



with the transfer of funds which had 
been in controversy to both the Uni- 
versity and the Alumni Association 
with clear title. 

Special attention has been directed 
to the dues structure so that credit may 
be received on a total basis for par- 
ticipation in school associations and in 
alumni clubs. A leaflet explaining the 
objectives, activities, and dues policy of 
all alumni units and organizations will 
soon be sent each alumnus. 

To state that alumni progress in all 
directions has been as rapid and as 
complete as we might have dreamed 
would be carrying our enthusiasm a 
step too far. On the other hand, we 
can honestly say this has been a year 
of which any alumni president could 
be proud. Conflicts were bound to 
arise. As they did, however, they were 
met and to a great degree resolved. 
Some necessary delays limited the 
initial effort to establish additional geo- 
graphical clubs. Limitations in relation 
to mailing facilities and personnel had 
to be both recognized and understood. 
Competition for necessary services has 
lessened as more effort is made to 
establish work schedules and to level 
out peak work periods. 

The initial Spring Reunion, combin- 
ing class reunions, lacrosse, and the 
Alumni-Varsitv Football Game with an 



informal luncheon and a post-game re- 
ception supper drew praise and should 
at least be given an additional chance 
to prove more successful than the June 
Reunions of previous years. 

Another definite highlight was the 
institution of an annual meeting and 
conference for Council members. Deans 
of the Schools and Colleges and Presi- 
dents of school associations and clubs 
throughout the country. All were re- 
quested to meet the needs and the 
problems of alumni effort in a frank 
and informal manner. Programs, ob- 
jectives, and aspirations were covered 
in an extended manner ami we I col 
certain new interest was generated, 
new cooperation achieved, and a 
helpful precedent established. 

These are the highlights. Much more 
might be said and special credit laid at 
the door step o\ a number o\ loyal and 
faithful alumni. 1 do not take credit 
for this success, but rather stand in the 
proud reflection of effort and loyaltj 
which has made another good year tor 
the Alumni Association of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. The honor ot serv- 
ing as your President is one winch I 
shall never forget 

JOS] I'll H. 1)1 ( KM \N 

President 

GENl K \1 \1 UMNI ( oi N< II 



JULY-AUGUST. 1958 



11 



Scholarships 

at the 

University of Maryland 



These days, when higher education, 
by virtue of its increasing cost, 
threatens once again to become the 
privilege of a special few, the question 
of financing a college education is of 
paramount importance. Dr. Elkins re- 
cently indicated the philosophy fol- 
lowed by the University regarding the 
matter of finances in his speech "The 
Age of Education" presented at the 
convocation of students and faculty 
February 28, 1958. He said, "Today 
there is general acceptance of the phi- 
losophy that higher education should 
be available to all who have ability, 
ambition, and initiative, and that this 
nation will prosper in proportion to a 
determination to fulfill its educational 
objective." 

One means of support for today's 
promising student is a scholarship. 
Some scholarships provide funds in 
limited amount for a limited time, some 
pay for an entire education covering a 
four-year period. 

What is the situation at the Univer- 
sity? How does your University pro- 
vide for students with the ability to 
complete a college education but who 
have not the means to acquire it? There 
are 785 students on scholarships of one 
type or another at the University, some 
of which are provided for by University 
funds and some which result from 
private endowments. The University has 
four general types of scholarships: Uni- 



versity scholarships, University grants. 
General Assembly grants, and endowed 
scholarships and grants. 

The scholarships, with the exception 
of the General Assembly Grants, are 
awarded through the Office of Scholar- 
ships in cooperation with the faculty 
Committee on Scholarsh